🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 4 matches in 0.001126s)
  1. Confinement in Non-Abelian Lattice Gauge Theory via Persistent Homology (2022)

    Daniel Spitz, Julian M. Urban, Jan M. Pawlowski
    Abstract We investigate the structure of confining and deconfining phases in SU(2) lattice gauge theory via persistent homology, which gives us access to the topology of a hierarchy of combinatorial objects constructed from given data. Specifically, we use filtrations by traced Polyakov loops, topological densities, holonomy Lie algebra fields, as well as electric and magnetic fields. This allows for a comprehensive picture of confinement. In particular, topological densities form spatial lumps which show signatures of the classical probability distribution of instanton-dyons. Signatures of well-separated dyons located at random positions are encoded in holonomy Lie algebra fields, following the semi-classical temperature dependence of the instanton appearance probability. Debye screening discriminating between electric and magnetic fields is visible in persistent homology and pronounced at large gauge coupling. All employed constructions are gauge-invariant without a priori assumptions on the configurations under study. This work showcases the versatility of persistent homology for statistical and quantum physics studies, barely explored to date.
  2. Crystallographic Interacting Topological Phases and Equvariant Cohomology: To Assume or Not to Assume (2020)

    Daniel Sheinbaum, Omar AntolĂ­n Camarena
    Abstract For symmorphic crystalline interacting gapped systems we derive a classification under adiabatic evolution. This classification is complete for non-degenerate ground states. For the degenerate case we discuss some invariants given by equivariant characteristic classes. We do not assume an emergent relativistic field theory nor that phases form a topological spectrum. We also do not assume short-range entanglement nor the existence of quasi-particles as is done in SPT and SET classifications respectively. Using a slightly generalized Bloch decomposition and Grassmanians made out of ground state spaces, we show that the \$P\$-equivariant cohomology of a \$d\$-dimensional torus gives rise to different interacting phases. We compare our results to bosonic symmorphic crystallographic SPT phases and to non-interacting fermionic crystallographic phases in class A. Finally we discuss the relation of our assumptions to those made for crystallographic SPT and SET phases.
  3. Topological Persistence Machine of Phase Transitions (2020)

    Quoc Hoan Tran, Mark Chen, Yoshihiko Hasegawa
    Abstract The study of phase transitions from experimental data becomes challenging, especially when little prior knowledge of the system is available. Topological data analysis is an emerging framework for characterizing the shape of data and has recently achieved success in detecting structural transitions in material science such as glass-liquid transition. However, data obtained from physical states may not have explicit shapes as structural materials. We propose a general framework called topological persistence machine to construct the shape of data from correlations in states; hence decipher phase transitions via the qualitative changes of the shape. Our framework enables an effective and unified approach in phase transition analysis. We demonstrate the impact in highly precise detection of Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transitions in the classical XY model, and quantum phase transition in the transverse Ising model and Bose-Hubbard model. Intriguingly, these phase transitions have proven to be notoriously difficult in traditional methods but can be characterized in our framework without requiring prior knowledge about phases. Our approach is thus expected applicable and brings a remarkable perspective for exploring phases of experimental physical systems.
  4. Homological Analysis of Multi-Qubit Entanglement (2018)

    Alessandra di Pierro, Stefano Mancini, Laleh Memarzadeh, Riccardo Mengoni
    Abstract We propose the usage of persistent homologies to characterize multipartite entanglement. On a multi-qubit data set we introduce metric-like measures defined in terms of bipartite entanglement and then we derive barcodes. We show that, depending on the distance, they are able to produce different classifications. In one case, it is possible to obtain the standard separability classes. In the other case, a new classification of entangled states of three and four qubits is provided.