🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 10 matches in 0.002445s)
  1. Topological Detection of Alzheimer’s Disease Using Betti Curves (2021)

    Ameer Saadat-Yazdi, Rayna Andreeva, Rik Sarkar
    Abstract Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating disease in the elderly, and is an increasing burden to the society due to an aging population. In this paper, we apply topological data analysis to structural MRI scans of the brain, and show that topological invariants make accurate predictors for Alzheimer’s. Using the construct of Betti Curves, we first show that topology is a good predictor of Age. Then we develop an approach to factor out the topological signature of age from Betti curves, and thus obtain accurate detection of Alzheimer’s disease. Experimental results show that topological features used with standard classifiers perform comparably to recently developed convolutional neural networks. These results imply that topology is a major aspect of structural changes due to aging and Alzheimer’s. We expect this relation will generate further insights for both early detection and better understanding of the disease.
  2. The Weighted Euler Curve Transform for Shape and Image Analysis (2020)

    Qitong Jiang, Sebastian Kurtek, Tom Needham
    Abstract The Euler Curve Transform (ECT) of Turner et al. is a complete invariant of an embedded simplicial complex, which is amenable to statistical analysis. We generalize the ECT to provide a similarly convenient representation for weighted simplicial complexes, objects which arise naturally, for example, in certain medical imaging applications. We leverage work of Ghrist et al. on Euler integral calculus to prove that this invariant—dubbed the Weighted Euler Curve Transform (WECT)—is also complete. We explain how to transform a segmented region of interest in a grayscale image into a weighted simplicial complex and then into a WECT representation. This WECT representation is applied to study Glioblastoma Multiforme brain tumor shape and texture data. We show that the WECT representation is effective at clustering tumors based on qualitative shape and texture features and that this clustering correlates with patient survival time.
  3. The Topology of Higher-Order Complexes Associated With Brain Hubs in Human Connectomes (2020)

    Miroslav Andjelković, Bosiljka Tadić, Roderick Melnik
    Abstract Higher-order connectivity in complex systems described by simplexes of different orders provides a geometry for simplex-based dynamical variables and interactions. Simplicial complexes that constitute a functional geometry of the human connectome can be crucial for the brain complex dynamics. In this context, the best-connected brain areas, designated as hub nodes, play a central role in supporting integrated brain function. Here, we study the structure of simplicial complexes attached to eight global hubs in the female and male connectomes and identify the core networks among the affected brain regions. These eight hubs (Putamen, Caudate, Hippocampus and Thalamus-Proper in the left and right cerebral hemisphere) are the highest-ranking according to their topological dimension, defined as the number of simplexes of all orders in which the node participates. Furthermore, we analyse the weight-dependent heterogeneity of simplexes. We demonstrate changes in the structure of identified core networks and topological entropy when the threshold weight is gradually increased. These results highlight the role of higher-order interactions in human brain networks and provide additional evidence for (dis)similarity between the female and male connectomes.
  4. Predicting Clinical Outcomes in Glioblastoma: An Application of Topological and Functional Data Analysis (2019)

    Lorin Crawford, Anthea Monod, Andrew X. Chen, Sayan Mukherjee, Raúl Rabadán
    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of human brain cancer that is under active study in the field of cancer biology. Its rapid progression and the relative time cost of obtaining molecular data make other readily available forms of data, such as images, an important resource for actionable measures in patients. Our goal is to use information given by medical images taken from GBM patients in statistical settings. To do this, we design a novel statistic—the smooth Euler characteristic transform (SECT)—that quantifies magnetic resonance images of tumors. Due to its well-defined inner product structure, the SECT can be used in a wider range of functional and nonparametric modeling approaches than other previously proposed topological summary statistics. When applied to a cohort of GBM patients, we find that the SECT is a better predictor of clinical outcomes than both existing tumor shape quantifications and common molecular assays. Specifically, we demonstrate that SECT features alone explain more of the variance in GBM patient survival than gene expression, volumetric features, and morphometric features. The main takeaways from our findings are thus 2-fold. First, they suggest that images contain valuable information that can play an important role in clinical prognosis and other medical decisions. Second, they show that the SECT is a viable tool for the broader study of medical imaging informatics. Supplementary materials for this article, including a standardized description of the materials available for reproducing the work, are available as an online supplement.
  5. Possible Clinical Use of Big Data: Personal Brain Connectomics (2018)

    Dong Soo Lee
    Abstract The biggest data is brain imaging data, which waited for clinical use during the last three decades. Topographic data interpretation prevailed for the first two decades, and only during the last decade, connectivity or connectomics data began to be analyzed properly. Owing to topological data interpretation and timely introduction of likelihood method based on hierarchical generalized linear model, we now foresee the clinical use of personal connectomics for classification and prediction of disease prognosis for brain diseases without any clue by currently available diagnostic methods.
  6. Revisiting Abnormalities in Brain Network Architecture Underlying Autism Using Topology-Inspired Statistical Inference (2018)

    Sourabh Palande, Vipin Jose, Brandon Zielinski, Jeffrey Anderson, P. Thomas Fletcher, Bei Wang
    Abstract A large body of evidence relates autism with abnormal structural and functional brain connectivity. Structural covariance magnetic resonance imaging (scMRI) is a technique that maps brain regions with covarying gray matter densities across subjects. It provides a way to probe the anatomical structure underlying intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) through analysis of gray matter signal covariance. In this article, we apply topological data analysis in conjunction with scMRI to explore network-specific differences in the gray matter structure in subjects with autism versus age-, gender-, and IQ-matched controls. Specifically, we investigate topological differences in gray matter structure captured by structural correlation graphs derived from three ICNs strongly implicated in autism, namely the salience network, default mode network, and executive control network. By combining topological data analysis with statistical inference, our results provide evidence of statistically significant network-specific structural abnormalities in autism.
  7. MRI and Biomechanics Multidimensional Data Analysis Reveals R2 -R1ρ as an Early Predictor of Cartilage Lesion Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis (2017)

    Valentina Pedoia, Jenny Haefeli, Kazuhito Morioka, Hsiang-Ling Teng, Lorenzo Nardo, Richard B. Souza, Adam R. Ferguson, Sharmila Majumdar
    Abstract PURPOSE: To couple quantitative compositional MRI, gait analysis, and machine learning multidimensional data analysis to study osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a multifactorial disorder accompanied by biochemical and morphological changes in the articular cartilage, modulated by skeletal biomechanics and gait. While we can now acquire detailed information about the knee joint structure and function, we are not yet able to leverage the multifactorial factors for diagnosis and disease management of knee OA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We mapped 178 subjects in a multidimensional space integrating: demographic, clinical information, gait kinematics and kinetics, cartilage compositional T1ρ and T2 and R2 -R1ρ (1/T2 -1/T1ρ ) acquired at 3T and whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score morphological grading. Topological data analysis (TDA) and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test were adopted for data integration, analysis, and hypothesis generation. Regression models were used for hypothesis testing. RESULTS: The results of the TDA showed a network composed of three main patient subpopulations, thus potentially identifying new phenotypes. T2 and T1ρ values (T2 lateral femur P = 1.45*10-8 , T1ρ medial tibia P = 1.05*10-5 ), the presence of femoral cartilage defects (P = 0.0013), lesions in the meniscus body (P = 0.0035), and race (P = 2.44*10-4 ) were key markers in the subpopulation classification. Within one of the subpopulations we observed an association between the composite metric R2 -R1ρ and the longitudinal progression of cartilage lesions. CONCLUSION: The analysis presented demonstrates some of the complex multitissue biochemical and biomechanical interactions that define joint degeneration and OA using a multidimensional approach, and potentially indicates that R2 -R1ρ may be an imaging biomarker for early OA. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:78-90.
  8. Topological Methods Reveal High and Low Functioning Neuro-Phenotypes Within Fragile X Syndrome (2014)

    David Romano, Monica Nicolau, Eve-Marie Quintin, Paul K. Mazaika, Amy A. Lightbody, Heather Cody Hazlett, Joseph Piven, Gunnar Carlsson, Allan L. Reiss
    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS), due to mutations of the FMR1 gene, is the most common known inherited cause of developmental disability as well as the most common single-gene risk factor for autism. Our goal was to examine variation in brain structure in FXS with topological data analysis (TDA), and to assess how such variation is associated with measures of IQ and autism-related behaviors. To this end, we analyzed imaging and behavioral data from young boys (n = 52; aged 1.57–4.15 years) diagnosed with FXS. Application of topological methods to structural MRI data revealed two large subgroups within the study population. Comparison of these subgroups showed significant between-subgroup neuroanatomical differences similar to those previously reported to distinguish children with FXS from typically developing controls (e.g., enlarged caudate). In addition to neuroanatomy, the groups showed significant differences in IQ and autism severity scores. These results suggest that despite arising from a single gene mutation, FXS may encompass two biologically, and clinically separable phenotypes. In addition, these findings underscore the potential of TDA as a powerful tool in the search for biological phenotypes of neuropsychiatric disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 35:4904–4915, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.