🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001318s)
  1. Manifold Learning for Coherent Design Interpolation Based on Geometrical and Topological Descriptors (2023)

    D. Muñoz, O. Allix, F. Chinesta, J. J. Ródenas, E. Nadal
    Abstract In the context of intellectual property in the manufacturing industry, know-how is referred to practical knowledge on how to accomplish a specific task. This know-how is often difficult to be synthesised in a set of rules or steps as it remains in the intuition and expertise of engineers, designers, and other professionals. Today, a new research line in this concern spot-up thanks to the explosion of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning algorithms and its alliance with Computational Mechanics and Optimisation tools. However, a key aspect with industrial design is the scarcity of available data, making it problematic to rely on deep-learning approaches. Assuming that the existing designs live in a manifold, in this paper, we propose a synergistic use of existing Machine Learning tools to infer a reduced manifold from the existing limited set of designs and, then, to use it to interpolate between the individuals, working as a generator basis, to create new and coherent designs. For this, a key aspect is to be able to properly interpolate in the reduced manifold, which requires a proper clustering of the individuals. From our experience, due to the scarcity of data, adding topological descriptors to geometrical ones considerably improves the quality of the clustering. Thus, a distance, mixing topology and geometry is proposed. This distance is used both, for the clustering and for the interpolation. For the interpolation, relying on optimal transport appear to be mandatory. Examples of growing complexity are proposed to illustrate the goodness of the method.
  2. Contagion Dynamics for Manifold Learning (2020)

    Barbara I. Mahler
    Abstract Contagion maps exploit activation times in threshold contagions to assign vectors in high-dimensional Euclidean space to the nodes of a network. A point cloud that is the image of a contagion map reflects both the structure underlying the network and the spreading behaviour of the contagion on it. Intuitively, such a point cloud exhibits features of the network's underlying structure if the contagion spreads along that structure, an observation which suggests contagion maps as a viable manifold-learning technique. We test contagion maps as a manifold-learning tool on a number of different real-world and synthetic data sets, and we compare their performance to that of Isomap, one of the most well-known manifold-learning algorithms. We find that, under certain conditions, contagion maps are able to reliably detect underlying manifold structure in noisy data, while Isomap fails due to noise-induced error. This consolidates contagion maps as a technique for manifold learning.