🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.000947s)
  1. Contagion Dynamics for Manifold Learning (2020)

    Barbara I. Mahler
    Abstract Contagion maps exploit activation times in threshold contagions to assign vectors in high-dimensional Euclidean space to the nodes of a network. A point cloud that is the image of a contagion map reflects both the structure underlying the network and the spreading behaviour of the contagion on it. Intuitively, such a point cloud exhibits features of the network's underlying structure if the contagion spreads along that structure, an observation which suggests contagion maps as a viable manifold-learning technique. We test contagion maps as a manifold-learning tool on a number of different real-world and synthetic data sets, and we compare their performance to that of Isomap, one of the most well-known manifold-learning algorithms. We find that, under certain conditions, contagion maps are able to reliably detect underlying manifold structure in noisy data, while Isomap fails due to noise-induced error. This consolidates contagion maps as a technique for manifold learning.
  2. Persistent Homology on Grassmann Manifolds for Analysis of Hyperspectral Movies (2016)

    Sofya Chepushtanova, Michael Kirby, Chris Peterson, Lori Ziegelmeier
    Abstract The existence of characteristic structure, or shape, in complex data sets has been recognized as increasingly important for mathematical data analysis. This realization has motivated the development of new tools such as persistent homology for exploring topological invariants, or features, in large data sets. In this paper, we apply persistent homology to the characterization of gas plumes in time dependent sequences of hyperspectral cubes, i.e. the analysis of 4-way arrays. We investigate hyperspectral movies of Long-Wavelength Infrared data monitoring an experimental release of chemical simulant into the air. Our approach models regions of interest within the hyperspectral data cubes as points on the real Grassmann manifold Gk,ï źn whose points parameterize the k-dimensional subspaces of \$\$\mathbb \R\\textasciicircumn\$\$Rn, contrasting our approach with the more standard framework in Euclidean space. An advantage of this approach is that it allows a sequence of time slices in a hyperspectral movie to be collapsed to a sequence of points in such a way that some of the key structure within and between the slices is encoded by the points on the Grassmann manifold. This motivates the search for topological features, associated with the evolution of the frames of a hyperspectral movie, within the corresponding points on the Grassmann manifold. The proposed mathematical model affords the processing of large data sets while retaining valuable discriminatory information. In this paper, we discuss how embedding our data in the Grassmann manifold, together with topological data analysis, captures dynamical events that occur as the chemical plume is released and evolves.