🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 6 matches in 0.00109s)
  1. Relational Persistent Homology for Multispecies Data With Application to the Tumor Microenvironment (2023)

    Bernadette J. Stolz, Jagdeep Dhesi, Joshua A. Bull, Heather A. Harrington, Helen M. Byrne, Iris H. R. Yoon
    Abstract Topological data analysis (TDA) is an active field of mathematics for quantifying shape in complex data. Standard methods in TDA such as persistent homology (PH) are typically focused on the analysis of data consisting of a single entity (e.g., cells or molecular species). However, state-of-the-art data collection techniques now generate exquisitely detailed multispecies data, prompting a need for methods that can examine and quantify the relations among them. Such heterogeneous data types arise in many contexts, ranging from biomedical imaging, geospatial analysis, to species ecology. Here, we propose two methods for encoding spatial relations among different data types that are based on Dowker complexes and Witness complexes. We apply the methods to synthetic multispecies data of a tumor microenvironment and analyze topological features that capture relations between different cell types, e.g., blood vessels, macrophages, tumor cells, and necrotic cells. We demonstrate that relational topological features can extract biological insight, including the dominant immune cell phenotype (an important predictor of patient prognosis) and the parameter regimes of a data-generating model. The methods provide a quantitative perspective on the relational analysis of multispecies spatial data, overcome the limits of traditional PH, and are readily computable.
  2. The Weighted Euler Curve Transform for Shape and Image Analysis (2020)

    Qitong Jiang, Sebastian Kurtek, Tom Needham
    Abstract The Euler Curve Transform (ECT) of Turner et al. is a complete invariant of an embedded simplicial complex, which is amenable to statistical analysis. We generalize the ECT to provide a similarly convenient representation for weighted simplicial complexes, objects which arise naturally, for example, in certain medical imaging applications. We leverage work of Ghrist et al. on Euler integral calculus to prove that this invariant—dubbed the Weighted Euler Curve Transform (WECT)—is also complete. We explain how to transform a segmented region of interest in a grayscale image into a weighted simplicial complex and then into a WECT representation. This WECT representation is applied to study Glioblastoma Multiforme brain tumor shape and texture data. We show that the WECT representation is effective at clustering tumors based on qualitative shape and texture features and that this clustering correlates with patient survival time.
  3. Hepatic Tumor Classification Using Texture and Topology Analysis of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Three-Dimensional T1-Weighted MR Images With a Radiomics Approach (2019)

    Asuka Oyama, Yasuaki Hiraoka, Ippei Obayashi, Yusuke Saikawa, Shigeru Furui, Kenshiro Shiraishi, Shinobu Kumagai, Tatsuya Hayashi, Jun’ichi Kotoku
    Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy for classification of hepatic tumors by characterization of T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images using two radiomics approaches with machine learning models: texture analysis and topological data analysis using persistent homology. This study assessed non-contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted images of 150 hepatic tumors. The lesions included 50 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), 50 metastatic tumors (MTs), and 50 hepatic hemangiomas (HHs) found respectively in 37, 23, and 33 patients. For classification, texture features were calculated, and also persistence images of three types (degree 0, degree 1 and degree 2) were obtained for each lesion from the 3D MR imaging data. We used three classification models. In the classification of HCC and MT (resp. HCC and HH, HH and MT), we obtained accuracy of 92% (resp. 90%, 73%) by texture analysis, and the highest accuracy of 85% (resp. 84%, 74%) when degree 1 (resp. degree 1, degree 2) persistence images were used. Our methods using texture analysis or topological data analysis allow for classification of the three hepatic tumors with considerable accuracy, and thus might be useful when applied for computer-aided diagnosis with MR images.
  4. Predicting Clinical Outcomes in Glioblastoma: An Application of Topological and Functional Data Analysis (2019)

    Lorin Crawford, Anthea Monod, Andrew X. Chen, Sayan Mukherjee, Raúl Rabadán
    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of human brain cancer that is under active study in the field of cancer biology. Its rapid progression and the relative time cost of obtaining molecular data make other readily available forms of data, such as images, an important resource for actionable measures in patients. Our goal is to use information given by medical images taken from GBM patients in statistical settings. To do this, we design a novel statistic—the smooth Euler characteristic transform (SECT)—that quantifies magnetic resonance images of tumors. Due to its well-defined inner product structure, the SECT can be used in a wider range of functional and nonparametric modeling approaches than other previously proposed topological summary statistics. When applied to a cohort of GBM patients, we find that the SECT is a better predictor of clinical outcomes than both existing tumor shape quantifications and common molecular assays. Specifically, we demonstrate that SECT features alone explain more of the variance in GBM patient survival than gene expression, volumetric features, and morphometric features. The main takeaways from our findings are thus 2-fold. First, they suggest that images contain valuable information that can play an important role in clinical prognosis and other medical decisions. Second, they show that the SECT is a viable tool for the broader study of medical imaging informatics. Supplementary materials for this article, including a standardized description of the materials available for reproducing the work, are available as an online supplement.
  5. Fast and Accurate Tumor Segmentation of Histology Images Using Persistent Homology and Deep Convolutional Features (2019)

    Talha Qaiser, Yee-Wah Tsang, Daiki Taniyama, Naoya Sakamoto, Kazuaki Nakane, David Epstein, Nasir Rajpoot
    Abstract Tumor segmentation in whole-slide images of histology slides is an important step towards computer-assisted diagnosis. In this work, we propose a tumor segmentation framework based on the novel concept of persistent homology profiles (PHPs). For a given image patch, the homology profiles are derived by efficient computation of persistent homology, which is an algebraic tool from homology theory. We propose an efficient way of computing topological persistence of an image, alternative to simplicial homology. The PHPs are devised to distinguish tumor regions from their normal counterparts by modeling the atypical characteristics of tumor nuclei. We propose two variants of our method for tumor segmentation: one that targets speed without compromising accuracy and the other that targets higher accuracy. The fast version is based on a selection of exemplar image patches from a convolution neural network (CNN) and patch classification by quantifying the divergence between the PHPs of exemplars and the input image patch. Detailed comparative evaluation shows that the proposed algorithm is significantly faster than competing algorithms while achieving comparable results. The accurate version combines the PHPs and high-level CNN features and employs a multi-stage ensemble strategy for image patch labeling. Experimental results demonstrate that the combination of PHPs and CNN features outperform competing algorithms. This study is performed on two independently collected colorectal datasets containing adenoma, adenocarcinoma, signet, and healthy cases. Collectively, the accurate tumor segmentation produces the highest average patch-level F1-score, as compared with competing algorithms, on malignant and healthy cases from both the datasets. Overall the proposed framework highlights the utility of persistent homology for histopathology image analysis.