🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 8 matches in 0.00168s)
  1. Imaging-Based Representation and Stratification of Intra-Tumor Heterogeneity via Tree-Edit Distance (2022)

    Lara Cavinato, Matteo Pegoraro, Alessandra Ragni, Francesca Ieva
    Abstract Personalized medicine is the future of medical practice. In oncology, tumor heterogeneity assessment represents a pivotal step for effective treatment planning and prognosis prediction. Despite new procedures for DNA sequencing and analysis, non-invasive methods for tumor characterization are needed to impact on daily routine. On purpose, imaging texture analysis is rapidly scaling, holding the promise to surrogate histopathological assessment of tumor lesions. In this work, we propose a tree-based representation strategy for describing intra-tumor heterogeneity of patients affected by metastatic cancer. We leverage radiomics information extracted from PET/CT imaging and we provide an exhaustive and easily readable summary of the disease spreading. We exploit this novel patient representation to perform cancer subtyping according to hierarchical clustering technique. To this purpose, a new heterogeneity-based distance between trees is defined and applied to a case study of prostate cancer. Clusters interpretation is explored in terms of concordance with severity status, tumor burden and biological characteristics. Results are promising, as the proposed method outperforms current literature approaches. Ultimately, the proposed method draws a general analysis framework that would allow to extract knowledge from daily acquired imaging data of patients and provide insights for effective treatment planning.
  2. Tree Decomposition of Reeb Graphs, Parametrized Complexity, and Applications to Phylogenetics (2020)

    Anastasios Stefanou
    Abstract Inspired by the interval decomposition of persistence modules and the extended Newick format of phylogenetic networks, we show that, inside the larger category of partially ordered Reeb graphs, every Reeb graph with n leaves and first Betti number s, can be identified with a coproduct of at most \$\$2\textasciicircums\$\$2s partially ordered trees with \$\$(n + s)\$\$(n+s) leaves. Reeb graphs are therefore classified up to isomorphism by their tree-decomposition. An implication of this result, is that the isomorphism problem for Reeb graphs is fixed parameter tractable when the parameter is the first Betti number. We propose partially ordered Reeb graphs as a model for time consistent phylogenetic networks and propose a certain Hausdorff distance as a metric on these structures.
  3. Automatic Tree Ring Detection Using Jacobi Sets (2020)

    Kayla Makela, Tim Ophelders, Michelle Quigley, Elizabeth Munch, Daniel Chitwood, Asia Dowtin
    Abstract Tree ring widths are an important source of climatic and historical data, but measuring these widths typically requires extensive manual work. Computer vision techniques provide promising directions towards the automation of tree ring detection, but most automated methods still require a substantial amount of user interaction to obtain high accuracy. We perform analysis on 3D X-ray CT images of a cross-section of a tree trunk, known as a tree disk. We present novel automated methods for locating the pith (center) of a tree disk, and ring boundaries. Our methods use a combination of standard image processing techniques and tools from topological data analysis. We evaluate the efficacy of our method for two different CT scans by comparing its results to manually located rings and centers and show that it is better than current automatic methods in terms of correctly counting each ring and its location. Our methods have several parameters, which we optimize experimentally by minimizing edit distances to the manually obtained locations.
  4. Atom-Specific Persistent Homology and Its Application to Protein Flexibility Analysis (2020)

    David Bramer, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Recently, persistent homology has had tremendous success in biomolecular data analysis. It works by examining the topological relationship or connectivity of a group of atoms in a molecule at a variety of scales, then rendering a family of topological representations of the molecule. However, persistent homology is rarely employed for the analysis of atomic properties, such as biomolecular flexibility analysis or B-factor prediction. This work introduces atom-specific persistent homology to provide a local atomic level representation of a molecule via a global topological tool. This is achieved through the construction of a pair of conjugated sets of atoms and corresponding conjugated simplicial complexes, as well as conjugated topological spaces. The difference between the topological invariants of the pair of conjugated sets is measured by Bottleneck and Wasserstein metrics and leads to an atom-specific topological representation of individual atomic properties in a molecule. Atom-specific topological features are integrated with various machine learning algorithms, including gradient boosting trees and convolutional neural network for protein thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. Extensive numerical results indicate the proposed method provides a powerful topological tool for analyzing and predicting localized information in complex macromolecules.
  5. Quantifying Genetic Innovation: Mathematical Foundations for the Topological Study of Reticulate Evolution (2020)

    Michael Lesnick, Raúl Rabadán, Daniel I. S. Rosenbloom
    Abstract A topological approach to the study of genetic recombination, based on persistent homology, was introduced by Chan, Carlsson, and Rabadán in 2013. This associates a sequence of signatures called barcodes to genomic data sampled from an evolutionary history. In this paper, we develop theoretical foundations for this approach. First, we present a novel formulation of the underlying inference problem. Specifically, we introduce and study the novelty profile, a simple, stable statistic of an evolutionary history which not only counts recombination events but also quantifies how recombination creates genetic diversity. We propose that the (hitherto implicit) goal of the topological approach to recombination is the estimation of novelty profiles. We then study the problem of obtaining a lower bound on the novelty profile using barcodes. We focus on a low-recombination regime, where the evolutionary history can be described by a directed acyclic graph called a galled tree, which differs from a tree only by isolated topological defects. We show that in this regime, under a complete sampling assumption, the \$1\textasciicircum\mathrm\st\\$ barcode yields a lower bound on the novelty profile, and hence on the number of recombination events. For \$i\textgreater1\$, the \$i\textasciicircum\\mathrm\th\\\$ barcode is empty. In addition, we use a stability principle to strengthen these results to ones which hold for any subsample of an arbitrary evolutionary history. To establish these results, we describe the topology of the Vietoris--Rips filtrations arising from evolutionary histories indexed by galled trees. As a step towards a probabilistic theory, we also show that for a random history indexed by a fixed galled tree and satisfying biologically reasonable conditions, the intervals of the \$1\textasciicircum\\mathrm\st\\\$ barcode are independent random variables. Using simulations, we explore the sensitivity of these intervals to recombination.
  6. A Topological Data Analysis Based Classification Method for Multiple Measurements (2019)

    Henri Riihimäki, Wojciech Chachólski, Jakob Theorell, Jan Hillert, Ryan Ramanujam
    Abstract \textlessh3\textgreaterAbstract\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessh3\textgreaterBackground\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterMachine learning models for repeated measurements are limited. Using topological data analysis (TDA), we present a classifier for repeated measurements which samples from the data space and builds a network graph based on the data topology. When applying this to two case studies, accuracy exceeds alternative models with additional benefits such as reporting data subsets with high purity along with feature values.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterResults\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterFor 300 examples of 3 tree species, the accuracy reached 80% after 30 datapoints, which was improved to 90% after increased sampling to 400 datapoints. Using data from 100 examples of each of 6 point processes, the classifier achieved 96.8% accuracy. In both datasets, the TDA classifier outperformed an alternative model.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterConclusions\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterThis algorithm and software can be beneficial for repeated measurement data common in biological sciences, as both an accurate classifier and a feature selection tool.\textless/p\textgreater
  7. Topology of Viral Evolution (2013)

    Joseph Minhow Chan, Gunnar Carlsson, Raul Rabadan
    Abstract The tree structure is currently the accepted paradigm to represent evolutionary relationships between organisms, species or other taxa. However, horizontal, or reticulate, genomic exchanges are pervasive in nature and confound characterization of phylogenetic trees. Drawing from algebraic topology, we present a unique evolutionary framework that comprehensively captures both clonal and reticulate evolution. We show that whereas clonal evolution can be summarized as a tree, reticulate evolution exhibits nontrivial topology of dimension greater than zero. Our method effectively characterizes clonal evolution, reassortment, and recombination in RNA viruses. Beyond detecting reticulate evolution, we succinctly recapitulate the history of complex genetic exchanges involving more than two parental strains, such as the triple reassortment of H7N9 avian influenza and the formation of circulating HIV-1 recombinants. In addition, we identify recurrent, large-scale patterns of reticulate evolution, including frequent PB2-PB1-PA-NP cosegregation during avian influenza reassortment. Finally, we bound the rate of reticulate events (i.e., 20 reassortments per year in avian influenza). Our method provides an evolutionary perspective that not only captures reticulate events precluding phylogeny, but also indicates the evolutionary scales where phylogenetic inference could be accurate.