🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 4 matches in 0.001763s)
  1. Statistical Inference for Persistent Homology Applied to Simulated fMRI Time Series Data (2023)

    Hassan Abdallah, Adam Regalski, Mohammad Behzad Kang, Maria Berishaj, Nkechi Nnadi, Asadur Chowdury, Vaibhav A. Diwadkar, Andrew Salch
    Abstract Time-series data are amongst the most widely-used in biomedical sciences, including domains such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Structure within time series data can be captured by the tools of topological data analysis (TDA). Persistent homology is the mostly commonly used data-analytic tool in TDA, and can effectively summarize complex high-dimensional data into an interpretable 2-dimensional representation called a persistence diagram. Existing methods for statistical inference for persistent homology of data depend on an independence assumption being satisfied. While persistent homology can be computed for each time index in a time-series, time-series data often fail to satisfy the independence assumption. This paper develops a statistical test that obviates the independence assumption by implementing a multi-level block sampled Monte Carlo test with sets of persistence diagrams. Its efficacy for detecting task-dependent topological organization is then demonstrated on simulated fMRI data. This new statistical test is therefore suitable for analyzing persistent homology of fMRI data, and of non-independent data in general.
  2. Hypothesis Testing for Shapes Using Vectorized Persistence Diagrams (2020)

    Chul Moon, Nicole A. Lazar
    Abstract Topological data analysis involves the statistical characterization of the shape of data. Persistent homology is a primary tool of topological data analysis, which can be used to analyze those topological features and perform statistical inference. In this paper, we present a two-stage hypothesis test for vectorized persistence diagrams. The first stage filters elements in the vectorized persistence diagrams to reduce false positives. The second stage consists of multiple hypothesis tests, with false positives controlled by false discovery rates. We demonstrate applications of the proposed procedure on simulated point clouds and three-dimensional rock image data. Our results show that the proposed hypothesis tests can provide flexible and informative inferences on the shape of data with lower computational cost compared to the permutation test.
  3. Revisiting Abnormalities in Brain Network Architecture Underlying Autism Using Topology-Inspired Statistical Inference (2018)

    Sourabh Palande, Vipin Jose, Brandon Zielinski, Jeffrey Anderson, P. Thomas Fletcher, Bei Wang
    Abstract A large body of evidence relates autism with abnormal structural and functional brain connectivity. Structural covariance magnetic resonance imaging (scMRI) is a technique that maps brain regions with covarying gray matter densities across subjects. It provides a way to probe the anatomical structure underlying intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) through analysis of gray matter signal covariance. In this article, we apply topological data analysis in conjunction with scMRI to explore network-specific differences in the gray matter structure in subjects with autism versus age-, gender-, and IQ-matched controls. Specifically, we investigate topological differences in gray matter structure captured by structural correlation graphs derived from three ICNs strongly implicated in autism, namely the salience network, default mode network, and executive control network. By combining topological data analysis with statistical inference, our results provide evidence of statistically significant network-specific structural abnormalities in autism.