🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 6 matches in 0.001681s)
  1. Persistence-Based Pooling for Shape Pose Recognition (2016)

    Thomas Bonis, Maks Ovsjanikov, Steve Oudot, Frédéric Chazal
    Abstract In this paper, we propose a novel pooling approach for shape classification and recognition using the bag-of-words pipeline, based on topological persistence, a recent tool from Topological Data Analysis. Our technique extends the standard max-pooling, which summarizes the distribution of a visual feature with a single number, thereby losing any notion of spatiality. Instead, we propose to use topological persistence, and the derived persistence diagrams, to provide significantly more informative and spatially sensitive characterizations of the feature functions, which can lead to better recognition performance. Unfortunately, despite their conceptual appeal, persistence diagrams are difficult to handle, since they are not naturally represented as vectors in Euclidean space and even the standard metric, the bottleneck distance is not easy to compute. Furthermore, classical distances between diagrams, such as the bottleneck and Wasserstein distances, do not allow to build positive definite kernels that can be used for learning. To handle this issue, we provide a novel way to transform persistence diagrams into vectors, in which comparisons are trivial. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of our construction on the Non-Rigid 3D Human Models SHREC 2014 dataset, where we show that topological pooling can provide significant improvements over the standard pooling methods for the shape pose recognition within the bag-of-words pipeline.
  2. A Stable Multi-Scale Kernel for Topological Machine Learning (2015)

    Jan Reininghaus, Stefan Huber, Ulrich Bauer, Roland Kwitt
    Abstract Topological data analysis offers a rich source of valuable information to study vision problems. Yet, so far we lack a theoretically sound connection to popular kernel-based learning techniques, such as kernel SVMs or kernel PCA. In this work, we establish such a connection by designing a multi-scale kernel for persistence diagrams, a stable summary representation of topological features in data. We show that this kernel is positive definite and prove its stability with respect to the 1-Wasserstein distance. Experiments on two benchmark datasets for 3D shape classification/retrieval and texture recognition show considerable performance gains of the proposed method compared to an alternative approach that is based on the recently introduced persistence landscapes.
  3. Extracting Insights From the Shape of Complex Data Using Topology (2013)

    P. Y. Lum, G. Singh, A. Lehman, T. Ishkanov, M. Vejdemo-Johansson, M. Alagappan, J. Carlsson, G. Carlsson
    Abstract This paper applies topological methods to study complex high dimensional data sets by extracting shapes (patterns) and obtaining insights about them. Our method combines the best features of existing standard methodologies such as principal component and cluster analyses to provide a geometric representation of complex data sets. Through this hybrid method, we often find subgroups in data sets that traditional methodologies fail to find. Our method also permits the analysis of individual data sets as well as the analysis of relationships between related data sets. We illustrate the use of our method by applying it to three very different kinds of data, namely gene expression from breast tumors, voting data from the United States House of Representatives and player performance data from the NBA, in each case finding stratifications of the data which are more refined than those produced by standard methods.
  4. A Mayer–Vietoris Formula for Persistent Homology With an Application to Shape Recognition in the Presence of Occlusions (2011)

    Barbara Di Fabio, Claudia Landi
    Abstract In algebraic topology it is well known that, using the Mayer–Vietoris sequence, the homology of a space X can be studied by splitting X into subspaces A and B and computing the homology of A, B, and A∩B. A natural question is: To what extent does persistent homology benefit from a similar property? In this paper we show that persistent homology has a Mayer–Vietoris sequence that is generally not exact but only of order 2. However, we obtain a Mayer–Vietoris formula involving the ranks of the persistent homology groups of X, A, B, and A∩B plus three extra terms. This implies that persistent homological features of A and B can be found either as persistent homological features of X or of A∩B. As an application of this result, we show that persistence diagrams are able to recognize an occluded shape by showing a common subset of points.
  5. Topological Methods for the Analysis of High Dimensional Data Sets and 3D Object Recognition (2007)

    Gurjeet Singh, Facundo Mémoli, Gunnar Carlsson
    Abstract We present a computational method for extracting simple descriptions of high dimensional data sets in the form of simplicial complexes. Our method, called Mapper, is based on the idea of partial clustering of the data guided by a set of functions defined on the data. The proposed method is not dependent on any particular clustering algorithm, i.e. any clustering algorithm may be used with Mapper. We implement this method and present a few sample applications in which simple descriptions of the data present important information about its structure.
  6. A Barcode Shape Descriptor for Curve Point Cloud Data (2004)

    Anne Collins, Afra Zomorodian, Gunnar Carlsson, Leonidas J. Guibas
    Abstract In this paper, we present a complete computational pipeline for extracting a compact shape descriptor for curve point cloud data (PCD). Our shape descriptor, called a barcode, is based on a blend of techniques from differential geometry and algebraic topology. We also provide a metric over the space of barcodes, enabling fast comparison of PCDs for shape recognition and clustering. To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, we implement our pipeline and provide experimental evidence in shape classification and parametrization.