🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001432s)
  1. Pattern Characterization Using Topological Data Analysis: Application to Piezo Vibration Striking Treatment (2023)

    Max M. Chumley, Melih C. Yesilli, Jisheng Chen, Firas A. Khasawneh, Yang Guo
    Abstract Quantifying patterns in visual or tactile textures provides important information about the process or phenomena that generated these patterns. In manufacturing, these patterns can be intentionally introduced as a design feature, or they can be a byproduct of a specific process. Since surface texture has significant impact on the mechanical properties and the longevity of the workpiece, it is important to develop tools for quantifying surface patterns and, when applicable, comparing them to their nominal counterparts. While existing tools may be able to indicate the existence of a pattern, they typically do not provide more information about the pattern structure, or how much it deviates from a nominal pattern. Further, prior works do not provide automatic or algorithmic approaches for quantifying other pattern characteristics such as depths’ consistency, and variations in the pattern motifs at different level sets. This paper leverages persistent homology from Topological Data Analysis (TDA) to derive noise-robust scores for quantifying motifs’ depth and roundness in a pattern. Specifically, sublevel persistence is used to derive scores that quantify the consistency of indentation depths at any level set in Piezo Vibration Striking Treatment (PVST) surfaces. Moreover, we combine sublevel persistence with the distance transform to quantify the consistency of the indentation radii, and to compare them with the nominal ones. Although the tool in our PVST experiments had a semi-spherical profile, we present a generalization of our approach to tools/motifs of arbitrary shapes thus making our method applicable to other pattern-generating manufacturing processes.
  2. Exploring Surface Texture Quantification in Piezo Vibration Striking Treatment (PVST) Using Topological Measures (2022)

    Melih C. Yesilli, Max M. Chumley, Jisheng Chen, Firas A. Khasawneh, Yang Guo
    Abstract Abstract. Surface texture influences wear and tribological properties of manufactured parts, and it plays a critical role in end-user products. Therefore, quantifying the order or structure of a manufactured surface provides important information on the quality and life expectancy of the product. Although texture can be intentionally introduced to enhance aesthetics or to satisfy a design function, sometimes it is an inevitable byproduct of surface treatment processes such as Piezo Vibration Striking Treatment (PVST). Measures of order for surfaces have been characterized using statistical, spectral, and geometric approaches. For nearly hexagonal lattices, topological tools have also been used to measure the surface order. This paper explores utilizing tools from Topological Data Analysis for measuring surface texture. We compute measures of order based on optical digital microscope images of surfaces treated using PVST. These measures are applied to the grid obtained from estimating the centers of tool impacts, and they quantify the grid’s deviations from the nominal one. Our results show that TDA provides a convenient framework for characterization of pattern type that bypasses some limitations of existing tools such as difficult manual processing of the data and the need for an expert user to analyze and interpret the surface images.
  3. Determining Clinically Relevant Features in Cytometry Data Using Persistent Homology (2022)

    Soham Mukherjee, Darren Wethington, Tamal K. Dey, Jayajit Das
    Abstract Cytometry experiments yield high-dimensional point cloud data that is difficult to interpret manually. Boolean gating techniques coupled with comparisons of relative abundances of cellular subsets is the current standard for cytometry data analysis. However, this approach is unable to capture more subtle topological features hidden in data, especially if those features are further masked by data transforms or significant batch effects or donor-to-donor variations in clinical data. We present that persistent homology, a mathematical structure that summarizes the topological features, can distinguish different sources of data, such as from groups of healthy donors or patients, effectively. Analysis of publicly available cytometry data describing non-naïve CD8+ T cells in COVID-19 patients and healthy controls shows that systematic structural differences exist between single cell protein expressions in COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. We identify proteins of interest by a decision-tree based classifier, sample points randomly and compute persistence diagrams from these sampled points. The resulting persistence diagrams identify regions in cytometry datasets of varying density and identify protruded structures such as ‘elbows’. We compute Wasserstein distances between these persistence diagrams for random pairs of healthy controls and COVID-19 patients and find that systematic structural differences exist between COVID-19 patients and healthy controls in the expression data for T-bet, Eomes, and Ki-67. Further analysis shows that expression of T-bet and Eomes are significantly downregulated in COVID-19 patient non-naïve CD8+ T cells compared to healthy controls. This counter-intuitive finding may indicate that canonical effector CD8+ T cells are less prevalent in COVID-19 patients than healthy controls. This method is applicable to any cytometry dataset for discovering novel insights through topological data analysis which may be difficult to ascertain otherwise with a standard gating strategy or existing bioinformatic tools.

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