🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001186s)
  1. Topological Data Analysis of Zebrafish Patterns (2020)

    Melissa R. McGuirl, Alexandria Volkening, Björn Sandstede
    Abstract Self-organized pattern behavior is ubiquitous throughout nature, from fish schooling to collective cell dynamics during organism development. Qualitatively these patterns display impressive consistency, yet variability inevitably exists within pattern-forming systems on both microscopic and macroscopic scales. Quantifying variability and measuring pattern features can inform the underlying agent interactions and allow for predictive analyses. Nevertheless, current methods for analyzing patterns that arise from collective behavior capture only macroscopic features or rely on either manual inspection or smoothing algorithms that lose the underlying agent-based nature of the data. Here we introduce methods based on topological data analysis and interpretable machine learning for quantifying both agent-level features and global pattern attributes on a large scale. Because the zebrafish is a model organism for skin pattern formation, we focus specifically on analyzing its skin patterns as a means of illustrating our approach. Using a recent agent-based model, we simulate thousands of wild-type and mutant zebrafish patterns and apply our methodology to better understand pattern variability in zebrafish. Our methodology is able to quantify the differential impact of stochasticity in cell interactions on wild-type and mutant patterns, and we use our methods to predict stripe and spot statistics as a function of varying cellular communication. Our work provides an approach to automatically quantifying biological patterns and analyzing agent-based dynamics so that we can now answer critical questions in pattern formation at a much larger scale.
  2. A Morphometric Analysis of Vegetation Patterns in Dryland Ecosystems (2017)

    Luke Mander, Stefan C. Dekker, Mao Li, Washington Mio, Surangi W. Punyasena, Timothy M. Lenton
    Abstract Vegetation in dryland ecosystems often forms remarkable spatial patterns. These range from regular bands of vegetation alternating with bare ground, to vegetated spots and labyrinths, to regular gaps of bare ground within an otherwise continuous expanse of vegetation. It has been suggested that spotted vegetation patterns could indicate that collapse into a bare ground state is imminent, and the morphology of spatial vegetation patterns, therefore, represents a potentially valuable source of information on the proximity of regime shifts in dryland ecosystems. In this paper, we have developed quantitative methods to characterize the morphology of spatial patterns in dryland vegetation. Our approach is based on algorithmic techniques that have been used to classify pollen grains on the basis of textural patterning, and involves constructing feature vectors to quantify the shapes formed by vegetation patterns. We have analysed images of patterned vegetation produced by a computational model and a small set of satellite images from South Kordofan (South Sudan), which illustrates that our methods are applicable to both simulated and real-world data. Our approach provides a means of quantifying patterns that are frequently described using qualitative terminology, and could be used to classify vegetation patterns in large-scale satellite surveys of dryland ecosystems.