🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001594s)
  1. Topological Electronic Structure and Weyl Points in Nonsymmorphic Hexagonal Materials (2020)

    Rafael González-Hernández, Erick Tuiran, Bernardo Uribe
    Abstract Using topological band theory analysis we show that the nonsymmorphic symmetry operations in hexagonal lattices enforce Weyl points at the screw-invariant high-symmetry lines of the band structure. The corepresentation theory and connectivity group theory show that Weyl points are generated by band crossings in accordion-like and hourglass-like dispersion relations. These Weyl points are stable against weak perturbations and are protected by the screw rotation symmetry. Based on first-principles calculations we found a complete agreement between the topological predicted energy dispersion relations and real hexagonal materials. Topological charge (chirality) and Berry curvature calculations show the simultaneous formation of Weyl points and nodal-lines in 4d transition-metal trifluorides such as AgF3 and AuF3. Furthermore, a large intrinsic spin-Hall conductivity was found due to the combined strong spin-orbit coupling and multiple Weyl-point crossings in the electronic structure. These materials could be used to the spin/charge conversion in more energy-efficient spintronic devices.
  2. Finding Universal Structures in Quantum Many-Body Dynamics via Persistent Homology (2020)

    Daniel Spitz, Jürgen Berges, Markus K. Oberthaler, Anna Wienhard
    Abstract Inspired by topological data analysis techniques, we introduce persistent homology observables and apply them in a geometric analysis of the dynamics of quantum field theories. As a prototype application, we consider simulated data of a two-dimensional Bose gas far from equilibrium. We discover a continuous spectrum of dynamical scaling exponents, which provides a refined classification of nonequilibrium universal phenomena. A possible explanation of the underlying processes is provided in terms of mixing wave turbulence and vortex kinetics components in point clouds. We find that the persistent homology scaling exponents are inherently linked to the geometry of the system, as the derivation of a packing relation reveals. The approach opens new ways of analyzing quantum many-body dynamics in terms of robust topological structures beyond standard field theoretic techniques.