🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001268s)
  1. Measuring Hidden Phenotype: Quantifying the Shape of Barley Seeds Using the Euler Characteristic Transform (2021)

    Erik J. Amézquita, Michelle Y. Quigley, Tim Ophelders, Jacob B. Landis, Daniel Koenig, Elizabeth Munch, Daniel H. Chitwood
    Abstract Shape plays a fundamental role in biology. Traditional phenotypic analysis methods measure some features but fail to measure the information embedded in shape comprehensively. To extract, compare, and analyze this information embedded in a robust and concise way, we turn to Topological Data Analysis (TDA), specifically the Euler Characteristic Transform. TDA measures shape comprehensively using mathematical representations based on algebraic topology features. To study its use, we compute both traditional and topological shape descriptors to quantify the morphology of 3121 barley seeds scanned with X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) technology at 127 micron resolution. The Euler Characteristic Transform measures shape by analyzing topological features of an object at thresholds across a number of directional axes. A Kruskal-Wallis analysis of the information encoded by the topological signature reveals that the Euler Characteristic Transform picks up successfully the shape of the crease and bottom of the seeds. Moreover, while traditional shape descriptors can cluster the seeds based on their accession, topological shape descriptors can cluster them further based on their panicle. We then successfully train a support vector machine (SVM) to classify 28 different accessions of barley based exclusively on the shape of their grains. We observe that combining both traditional and topological descriptors classifies barley seeds better than using just traditional descriptors alone. This improvement suggests that TDA is thus a powerful complement to traditional morphometrics to comprehensively describe a multitude of “hidden” shape nuances which are otherwise not detected.
  2. The Geometry of Synchronization Problems and Learning Group Actions (2019)

    Tingran Gao, Jacek Brodzki, Sayan Mukherjee
    Abstract We develop a geometric framework, based on the classical theory of fibre bundles, to characterize the cohomological nature of a large class of synchronization-type problems in the context of graph inference and combinatorial optimization. We identify each synchronization problem in topological group G on connected graph ΓΓ\Gamma with a flat principal G-bundle over ΓΓ\Gamma , thus establishing a classification result for synchronization problems using the representation variety of the fundamental group of ΓΓ\Gamma into G. We then develop a twisted Hodge theory on flat vector bundles associated with these flat principal G-bundles, and provide a geometric realization of the graph connection Laplacian as the lowest-degree Hodge Laplacian in the twisted de Rham–Hodge cochain complex. Motivated by these geometric intuitions, we propose to study the problem of learning group actions—partitioning a collection of objects based on the local synchronizability of pairwise correspondence relations—and provide a heuristic synchronization-based algorithm for solving this type of problems. We demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm on simulated and real datasets.
  3. Morphometrics Reveals Complex and Heritable Apple Leaf Shapes (2018)

    Zoë Migicovsky, Mao Li, Daniel H. Chitwood, Sean Myles
    Abstract Apple (Malus spp.) is a widely grown and valuable fruit crop. Leaf shape is important for flowering in apple and may also be an early indicator for other agriculturally valuable traits. We examined 9,000 leaves from 869 unique apple accessions using linear measurements and comprehensive morphometric techniques. We identified allometric variation as the result of differing length-to-width aspect ratios between accessions and species of apple. The allometric variation was due to variation in the width of the leaf blade, not the length. Aspect ratio was highly correlated with the first principal component (PC1) of morphometric variation quantified using elliptical Fourier descriptors (EFDs) and persistent homology (PH). While the primary source of variation was aspect ratio, subsequent PCs corresponded to complex shape variation not captured by linear measurements. After linking the morphometric information with over 122,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we found high SNP heritability values even at later PCs, indicating that comprehensive morphometrics can capture complex, heritable phenotypes. Thus, techniques such as EFDs and PH are capturing heritable biological variation that would be missed using linear measurements alone.