🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 7 matches in 0.002198s)
  1. From Trees to Barcodes and Back Again: Theoretical and Statistical Perspectives (2020)

    Lida Kanari, Adélie Garin, Kathryn Hess
    Abstract Methods of topological data analysis have been successfully applied in a wide range of fields to provide useful summaries of the structure of complex data sets in terms of topological descriptors, such as persistence diagrams. While there are many powerful techniques for computing topological descriptors, the inverse problem, i.e., recovering the input data from topological descriptors, has proved to be challenging. In this article we study in detail the Topological Morphology Descriptor (TMD), which assigns a persistence diagram to any tree embedded in Euclidean space, and a sort of stochastic inverse to the TMD, the Topological Neuron Synthesis (TNS) algorithm, gaining both theoretical and computational insights into the relation between the two. We propose a new approach to classify barcodes using symmetric groups, which provides a concrete language to formulate our results. We investigate to what extent the TNS recovers a geometric tree from its TMD and describe the effect of different types of noise on the process of tree generation from persistence diagrams. We prove moreover that the TNS algorithm is stable with respect to specific types of noise.
  2. Capturing Dynamics of Time-Varying Data via Topology (2020)

    Lu Xian, Henry Adams, Chad M. Topaz, Lori Ziegelmeier
    Abstract One approach to understanding complex data is to study its shape through the lens of algebraic topology. While the early development of topological data analysis focused primarily on static data, in recent years, theoretical and applied studies have turned to data that varies in time. A time-varying collection of metric spaces as formed, for example, by a moving school of fish or flock of birds, can contain a vast amount of information. There is often a need to simplify or summarize the dynamic behavior. We provide an introduction to topological summaries of time-varying metric spaces including vineyards [17], crocker plots [52], and multiparameter rank functions [34]. We then introduce a new tool to summarize time-varying metric spaces: a crocker stack. Crocker stacks are convenient for visualization, amenable to machine learning, and satisfy a desirable stability property which we prove. We demonstrate the utility of crocker stacks for a parameter identification task involving an influential model of biological aggregations [54]. Altogether, we aim to bring the broader applied mathematics community up-to-date on topological summaries of time-varying metric spaces.
  3. Topological Persistence for Relating Microstructure and Capillary Fluid Trapping in Sandstones (2019)

    A. L. Herring, V. Robins, A. P. Sheppard
    Abstract Results from a series of two-phase fluid flow experiments in Leopard, Berea, and Bentheimer sandstones are presented. Fluid configurations are characterized using laboratory-based and synchrotron based 3-D X-ray computed tomography. All flow experiments are conducted under capillary-dominated conditions. We conduct geometry-topology analysis via persistent homology and compare this to standard topological and watershed-partition-based pore-network statistics. Metrics identified as predictors of nonwetting fluid trapping are calculated from the different analytical methods and are compared to levels of trapping measured during drainage-imbibition cycles in the experiments. Metrics calculated from pore networks (i.e., pore body-throat aspect ratio and coordination number) and topological analysis (Euler characteristic) do not correlate well with trapping in these samples. In contrast, a new metric derived from the persistent homology analysis, which incorporates counts of topological features as well as their length scale and spatial distribution, correlates very well (R2 = 0.97) to trapping for all systems. This correlation encompasses a wide range of porous media and initial fluid configurations, and also applies to data sets of different imaging and image processing protocols.
  4. Visual Detection of Structural Changes in Time-Varying Graphs Using Persistent Homology (2018)

    Mustafa Hajij, Bei Wang, Carlos Scheidegger, Paul Rosen
    Abstract Topological data analysis is an emerging area in exploratory data analysis and data mining. Its main tool, persistent homology, has become a popular technique to study the structure of complex, high-dimensional data. In this paper, we propose a novel method using persistent homology to quantify structural changes in time-varying graphs. Specifically, we transform each instance of the time-varying graph into a metric space, extract topological features using persistent homology, and compare those features over time. We provide a visualization that assists in time-varying graph exploration and helps to identify patterns of behavior within the data. To validate our approach, we conduct several case studies on real-world datasets and show how our method can find cyclic patterns, deviations from those patterns, and one-time events in time-varying graphs. We also examine whether a persistence-based similarity measure satisfies a set of well-established, desirable properties for graph metrics.
  5. Extracting Insights From the Shape of Complex Data Using Topology (2013)

    P. Y. Lum, G. Singh, A. Lehman, T. Ishkanov, M. Vejdemo-Johansson, M. Alagappan, J. Carlsson, G. Carlsson
    Abstract This paper applies topological methods to study complex high dimensional data sets by extracting shapes (patterns) and obtaining insights about them. Our method combines the best features of existing standard methodologies such as principal component and cluster analyses to provide a geometric representation of complex data sets. Through this hybrid method, we often find subgroups in data sets that traditional methodologies fail to find. Our method also permits the analysis of individual data sets as well as the analysis of relationships between related data sets. We illustrate the use of our method by applying it to three very different kinds of data, namely gene expression from breast tumors, voting data from the United States House of Representatives and player performance data from the NBA, in each case finding stratifications of the data which are more refined than those produced by standard methods.
  6. Lipschitz Functions Have Lp-Stable Persistence (2010)

    David Cohen-Steiner, Herbert Edelsbrunner, John Harer, Yuriy Mileyko
    Abstract We prove two stability results for Lipschitz functions on triangulable, compact metric spaces and consider applications of both to problems in systems biology. Given two functions, the first result is formulated in terms of the Wasserstein distance between their persistence diagrams and the second in terms of their total persistence.