🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 75 matches in 0.008881s)
  1. Genomics Data Analysis via Spectral Shape and Topology (2022)

    Erik J. Amézquita, Farzana Nasrin, Kathleen M. Storey, Masato Yoshizawa
    Abstract Mapper, a topological algorithm, is frequently used as an exploratory tool to build a graphical representation of data. This representation can help to gain a better understanding of the intrinsic shape of high-dimensional genomic data and to retain information that may be lost using standard dimension-reduction algorithms. We propose a novel workflow to process and analyze RNA-seq data from tumor and healthy subjects integrating Mapper and differential gene expression. Precisely, we show that a Gaussian mixture approximation method can be used to produce graphical structures that successfully separate tumor and healthy subjects, and produce two subgroups of tumor subjects. A further analysis using DESeq2, a popular tool for the detection of differentially expressed genes, shows that these two subgroups of tumor cells bear two distinct gene regulations, suggesting two discrete paths for forming lung cancer, which could not be highlighted by other popular clustering methods, including t-SNE. Although Mapper shows promise in analyzing high-dimensional data, building tools to statistically analyze Mapper graphical structures is limited in the existing literature. In this paper, we develop a scoring method using heat kernel signatures that provides an empirical setting for statistical inferences such as hypothesis testing, sensitivity analysis, and correlation analysis.
  2. A Novel Quality Clustering Methodology on Fab-Wide Wafer Map Images in Semiconductor Manufacturing (2022)

    Yuan-Ming Hsu, Xiaodong Jia, Wenzhe Li, Jay Lee
    Abstract Abstract. In semiconductor manufacturing, clustering the fab-wide wafer map images is of critical importance for practitioners to understand the subclusters of wafer defects, recognize novel clusters or anomalies, and develop fast reactions to quality issues. However, due to the high-mix manufacturing of diversified wafer products of different sizes and technologies, it is difficult to cluster the wafer map images across the fab. This paper addresses this challenge by proposing a novel methodology for fab-wide wafer map data clustering. In the proposed methodology, a well-known deep learning technique, vision transformer with multi-head attention is first trained to convert binary wafer images of different sizes into condensed feature vectors for efficient clustering. Then, the Topological Data Analysis (TDA), which is widely used in biomedical applications, is employed to visualize the data clusters and identify the anomalies. The TDA yields a topological representation of high-dimensional big data as well as its local clusters by creating a graph that shows nodes corresponding to the clusters within the data. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated by clustering the public wafer map dataset WM-811k from the real application which has a total of 811,457 wafer map images. We further demonstrate the potential applicability of topology data analytics in the semiconductor area by visualization.
  3. Quantification of the Immune Content in Neuroblastoma: Deep Learning and Topological Data Analysis in Digital Pathology (2021)

    Nicole Bussola, Bruno Papa, Ombretta Melaiu, Aurora Castellano, Doriana Fruci, Giuseppe Jurman
    Abstract We introduce here a novel machine learning (ML) framework to address the issue of the quantitative assessment of the immune content in neuroblastoma (NB) specimens. First, the EUNet, a U-Net with an EfficientNet encoder, is trained to detect lymphocytes on tissue digital slides stained with the CD3 T-cell marker. The training set consists of 3782 images extracted from an original collection of 54 whole slide images (WSIs), manually annotated for a total of 73,751 lymphocytes. Resampling strategies, data augmentation, and transfer learning approaches are adopted to warrant reproducibility and to reduce the risk of overfitting and selection bias. Topological data analysis (TDA) is then used to define activation maps from different layers of the neural network at different stages of the training process, described by persistence diagrams (PD) and Betti curves. TDA is further integrated with the uniform manifold approximation and projection (UMAP) dimensionality reduction and the hierarchical density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (HDBSCAN) algorithm for clustering, by the deep features, the relevant subgroups and structures, across different levels of the neural network. Finally, the recent TwoNN approach is leveraged to study the variation of the intrinsic dimensionality of the U-Net model. As the main task, the proposed pipeline is employed to evaluate the density of lymphocytes over the whole tissue area of the WSIs. The model achieves good results with mean absolute error 3.1 on test set, showing significant agreement between densities estimated by our EUNet model and by trained pathologists, thus indicating the potentialities of a promising new strategy in the quantification of the immune content in NB specimens. Moreover, the UMAP algorithm unveiled interesting patterns compatible with pathological characteristics, also highlighting novel insights into the dynamics of the intrinsic dataset dimensionality at different stages of the training process. All the experiments were run on the Microsoft Azure cloud platform.
  4. Topological Data Analysis Quantifies Biological Nano-Structure From Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (2020)

    Jeremy A. Pike, Abdullah O. Khan, Chiara Pallini, Steven G. Thomas, Markus Mund, Jonas Ries, Natalie S. Poulter, Iain B. Styles
    Abstract AbstractMotivation. Localization microscopy data is represented by a set of spatial coordinates, each corresponding to a single detection, that form a point cl
  5. Classification of Skin Lesions by Topological Data Analysis Alongside With Neural Network (2020)

    Naiereh Elyasi, Mehdi Hosseini Moghadam
    Abstract In this paper we use TDA mapper alongside with deep convolutional neural networks in the classification of 7 major skin diseases. First we apply kepler mapper with neural network as one of its filter steps to classify the dataset HAM10000. Mapper visualizes the classification result by a simplicial complex, where neural network can not do this alone, but as a filter step neural network helps to classify data better. Furthermore we apply TDA mapper and persistent homology to understand the weights of layers of mobilenet network in different training epochs of HAM10000. Also we use persistent diagrams to visualize the results of analysis of layers of mobilenet network.
  6. Mapping Firms' Locations in Technological Space: A Topological Analysis of Patent Statistics (2020)

    Emerson G. Escolar, Yasuaki Hiraoka, Mitsuru Igami, Yasin Ozcan
    Abstract Where do firms innovate? Mapping their locations in technological space is difficult, because it is high dimensional and unstructured. We address this issue by using a method in computational topology called the Mapper algorithm, which combines local clustering with global reconstruction. We apply this method to a panel of 333 major firms’ patent portfolios in 1976–2005 across 430 technological areas. Results suggest the Mapper graph captures salient patterns in firms’ patenting histories, and our measures of their uniqueness (the length of “flares”) are correlated with firms’ financial performances in a statistically and economically significant manner. We then compare this approach with a widely used clustering method by Jaffe (1989) to highlight additional findings.
  7. Topological Analysis Reveals State Transitions in Human Gut and Marine Bacterial Communities (2020)

    William K. Chang, David VanInsberghe, Libusha Kelly
    Abstract Microbiome dynamics influence the health and functioning of human physiology and the environment and are driven in part by interactions between large numbers of microbial taxa, making large-scale prediction and modeling a challenge. Here, using topological data analysis, we identify states and dynamical features relevant to macroscopic processes. We show that gut disease processes and marine geochemical events are associated with transitions between community states, defined as topological features of the data density. We find a reproducible two-state succession during recovery from cholera in the gut microbiomes of multiple patients, evidence of dynamic stability in the gut microbiome of a healthy human after experiencing diarrhea during travel, and periodic state transitions in a marine Prochlorococcus community driven by water column cycling. Our approach bridges small-scale fluctuations in microbiome composition and large-scale changes in phenotype without details of underlying mechanisms, and provides an assessment of microbiome stability and its relation to human and environmental health.
  8. Topological Data Analysis of Single-Cell Hi-C Contact Maps (2020)

    Mathieu Carrière, Raúl Rabadán
    Abstract Due to recent breakthroughs in high-throughput sequencing, it is now possible to use chromosome conformation capture (CCC) to understand the three dimensional conformation of DNA at the whole genome level, and to characterize it with the so-called contact maps. This is very useful since many biological processes are correlated with DNA folding, such as DNA transcription. However, the methods for the analysis of such conformations are still lacking mathematical guarantees and statistical power. To handle this issue, we propose to use the Mapper, which is a standard tool of Topological Data Analysis (TDA) that allows one to efficiently encode the inherent continuity and topology of underlying biological processes in data, in the form of a graph with various features such as branches and loops. In this article, we show how recent statistical techniques developed in TDA for the Mapper algorithm can be extended and leveraged to formally define and statistically quantify the presence of topological structures coming from biological phenomena, such as the cell cyle, in datasets of CCC contact maps.
  9. Fibers of Failure: Classifying Errors in Predictive Processes (2020)

    Leo S. Carlsson, Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson, Gunnar Carlsson, Pär G. Jönsson
    Abstract Predictive models are used in many different fields of science and engineering and are always prone to make faulty predictions. These faulty predictions can be more or less malignant depending on the model application. We describe fibers of failure (FiFa), a method to classify failure modes of predictive processes. Our method uses Mapper, an algorithm from topological data analysis (TDA), to build a graphical model of input data stratified by prediction errors. We demonstrate two ways to use the failure mode groupings: either to produce a correction layer that adjusts predictions by similarity to the failure modes; or to inspect members of the failure modes to illustrate and investigate what characterizes each failure mode. We demonstrate FiFa on two scenarios: a convolutional neural network (CNN) predicting MNIST images with added noise, and an artificial neural network (ANN) predicting the electrical energy consumption of an electric arc furnace (EAF). The correction layer on the CNN model improved its prediction accuracy significantly while the inspection of failure modes for the EAF model provided guiding insights into the domain-specific reasons behind several high-error regions.
  10. Identification of Relevant Genetic Alterations in Cancer Using Topological Data Analysis (2020)

    Raúl Rabadán, Yamina Mohamedi, Udi Rubin, Tim Chu, Adam N. Alghalith, Oliver Elliott, Luis Arnés, Santiago Cal, Álvaro J. Obaya, Arnold J. Levine, Pablo G. Cámara
    Abstract Large-scale cancer genomic studies enable the systematic identification of mutations that lead to the genesis and progression of tumors, uncovering the underlying molecular mechanisms and potential therapies. While some such mutations are recurrently found in many tumors, many others exist solely within a few samples, precluding detection by conventional recurrence-based statistical approaches. Integrated analysis of somatic mutations and RNA expression data across 12 tumor types reveals that mutations of cancer genes are usually accompanied by substantial changes in expression. We use topological data analysis to leverage this observation and uncover 38 elusive candidate cancer-associated genes, including inactivating mutations of the metalloproteinase ADAMTS12 in lung adenocarcinoma. We show that ADAMTS12−/− mice have a five-fold increase in the susceptibility to develop lung tumors, confirming the role of ADAMTS12 as a tumor suppressor gene. Our results demonstrate that data integration through topological techniques can increase our ability to identify previously unreported cancer-related alterations., Rare cancer mutations are often missed using recurrence-based statistical approaches, but are usually accompanied by changes in expression. Here the authors leverage this information to uncover several elusive candidate cancer-associated genes using topological data analysis.
  11. Steinhaus Filtration and Stable Paths in the Mapper (2020)

    Dustin L. Arendt, Matthew Broussard, Bala Krishnamoorthy, Nathaniel Saul
    Abstract Two central concepts from topological data analysis are persistence and the Mapper construction. Persistence employs a sequence of objects built on data called a filtration. A Mapper produces insightful summaries of data, and has found widespread applications in diverse areas. We define a new filtration called the cover filtration built from a single cover based on a generalized Steinhaus distance, which is a generalization of Jaccard distance. We prove a stability result: the cover filtrations of two covers are \$\alpha/m\$ interleaved, where \$\alpha\$ is a bound on bottleneck distance between covers and \$m\$ is the size of smallest set in either cover. We also show our construction is equivalent to the Cech filtration under certain settings, and the Vietoris-Rips filtration completely determines the cover filtration in all cases. We then develop a theory for stable paths within this filtration. Unlike standard results on stability in topological persistence, our definition of path stability aligns exactly with the above result on stability of cover filtration. We demonstrate how our framework can be employed in a variety of applications where a metric is not obvious but a cover is readily available. First we present a new model for recommendation systems using cover filtration. For an explicit example, stable paths identified on a movies data set represent sequences of movies constituting gentle transitions from one genre to another. As a second application in explainable machine learning, we apply the Mapper for model induction, providing explanations in the form of paths between subpopulations. Stable paths in the Mapper from a supervised machine learning model trained on the FashionMNIST data set provide improved explanations of relationships between subpopulations of images.
  12. An Industry Case of Large-Scale Demand Forecasting of Hierarchical Components (2019)

    Rodrigo Rivera-Castro, Ivan Nazarov, Yuke Xiang, Ivan Maksimov, Aleksandr Pletnev, Evgeny Burnaev
    Abstract Demand forecasting of hierarchical components is essential in manufacturing. However, its discussion in the machine-learning literature has been limited, and judgemental forecasts remain pervasive in the industry. Demand planners require easy-to-understand tools capable of delivering state-of-the-art results. This work presents an industry case of demand forecasting at one of the largest manufacturers of electronics in the world. It seeks to support practitioners with five contributions: (1) A benchmark of fourteen demand forecast methods applied to a relevant data set, (2) A data transformation technique yielding comparable results with state of the art, (3) An alternative to ARIMA based on matrix factorization, (4) A model selection technique based on topological data analysis for time series and (5) A novel data set. Organizations seeking to up-skill existing personnel and increase forecast accuracy will find value in this work.
  13. Topological Data Analysis for Genomics and Evolution: Topology in Biology (2019)

    Raul Rabadan, Andrew J. Blumberg
    Abstract Biology has entered the age of Big Data. A technical revolution has transformed the field, and extracting meaningful information from large biological data sets is now a central methodological challenge. Algebraic topology is a well-established branch of pure mathematics that studies qualitative descriptors of the shape of geometric objects. It aims to reduce comparisons of shape to a comparison of algebraic invariants, such as numbers, which are typically easier to work with. Topological data analysis is a rapidly developing subfield that leverages the tools of algebraic topology to provide robust multiscale analysis of data sets. This book introduces the central ideas and techniques of topological data analysis and its specific applications to biology, including the evolution of viruses, bacteria and humans, genomics of cancer, and single cell characterization of developmental processes. Bridging two disciplines, the book is for researchers and graduate students in genomics and evolutionary biology as well as mathematicians interested in applied topology.
  14. A Topological Data Analysis Based Classification Method for Multiple Measurements (2019)

    Henri Riihimäki, Wojciech Chachólski, Jakob Theorell, Jan Hillert, Ryan Ramanujam
    Abstract \textlessh3\textgreaterAbstract\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessh3\textgreaterBackground\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterMachine learning models for repeated measurements are limited. Using topological data analysis (TDA), we present a classifier for repeated measurements which samples from the data space and builds a network graph based on the data topology. When applying this to two case studies, accuracy exceeds alternative models with additional benefits such as reporting data subsets with high purity along with feature values.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterResults\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterFor 300 examples of 3 tree species, the accuracy reached 80% after 30 datapoints, which was improved to 90% after increased sampling to 400 datapoints. Using data from 100 examples of each of 6 point processes, the classifier achieved 96.8% accuracy. In both datasets, the TDA classifier outperformed an alternative model.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterConclusions\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterThis algorithm and software can be beneficial for repeated measurement data common in biological sciences, as both an accurate classifier and a feature selection tool.\textless/p\textgreater
  15. Molecular Phenotyping Using Networks, Diffusion, and Topology: Soft Tissue Sarcoma (2019)

    James C. Mathews, Maryam Pouryahya, Caroline Moosmüller, Yannis G. Kevrekidis, Joseph O. Deasy, Allen Tannenbaum
    Abstract Many biological datasets are high-dimensional yet manifest an underlying order. In this paper, we describe an unsupervised data analysis methodology that operates in the setting of a multivariate dataset and a network which expresses influence between the variables of the given set. The technique involves network geometry employing the Wasserstein distance, global spectral analysis in the form of diffusion maps, and topological data analysis using the Mapper algorithm. The prototypical application is to gene expression profiles obtained from RNA-Seq experiments on a collection of tissue samples, considering only genes whose protein products participate in a known pathway or network of interest. Employing the technique, we discern several coherent states or signatures displayed by the gene expression profiles of the sarcomas in the Cancer Genome Atlas along the TP53 (p53) signaling network. The signatures substantially recover the leiomyosarcoma, dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDLPS), and synovial sarcoma histological subtype diagnoses, and they also include a new signature defined by activation and inactivation of about a dozen genes, including activation of serine endopeptidase inhibitor SERPINE1 and inactivation of TP53-family tumor suppressor gene TP73.
  16. Topological Gene Expression Networks Recapitulate Brain Anatomy and Function (2019)

    Alice Patania, Pierluigi Selvaggi, Mattia Veronese, Ottavia Dipasquale, Paul Expert, Giovanni Petri
    Abstract Understanding how gene expression translates to and affects human behavior is one of the ultimate goals of neuroscience. In this paper, we present a pipeline based on Mapper, a topological simplification tool, to analyze gene co-expression data. We first validate the method by reproducing key results from the literature on the Allen Human Brain Atlas and the correlations between resting-state fMRI and gene co-expression maps. We then analyze a dopamine-related gene set and find that co-expression networks produced by Mapper return a structure that matches the well-known anatomy of the dopaminergic pathway. Our results suggest that network based descriptions can be a powerful tool to explore the relationships between genetic pathways and their association with brain function and its perturbation due to illness and/or pharmacological challenges., In this paper, we described a gene co-expression analysis pipeline that produces networks that we show to be closely related to either brain function and to neurotransmitter pathways. Our results suggest that this pipeline could be developed into a platform enabling the exploration of the effects of physiological and pathological alterations to specific gene sets, including profiling drugs effects.
  17. Towards a New Approach to Reveal Dynamical Organization of the Brain Using Topological Data Analysis (2018)

    Manish Saggar, Olaf Sporns, Javier Gonzalez-Castillo, Peter A. Bandettini, Gunnar Carlsson, Gary Glover, Allan L. Reiss
    Abstract Approaches describing how the brain changes to accomplish cognitive tasks tend to rely on collapsed data. Here, authors present a new approach that maintains high dimensionality and use it to describe individual differences in how brain activity is represented and organized across different cognitive tasks.
  18. Improved Understanding of Aqueous Solubility Modeling Through Topological Data Analysis (2018)

    Mariam Pirashvili, Lee Steinberg, Francisco Belchi Guillamon, Mahesan Niranjan, Jeremy G. Frey, Jacek Brodzki
    Abstract Topological data analysis is a family of recent mathematical techniques seeking to understand the ‘shape’ of data, and has been used to understand the structure of the descriptor space produced from a standard chemical informatics software from the point of view of solubility. We have used the mapper algorithm, a TDA method that creates low-dimensional representations of data, to create a network visualization of the solubility space. While descriptors with clear chemical implications are prominent features in this space, reflecting their importance to the chemical properties, an unexpected and interesting correlation between chlorine content and rings and their implication for solubility prediction is revealed. A parallel representation of the chemical space was generated using persistent homology applied to molecular graphs. Links between this chemical space and the descriptor space were shown to be in agreement with chemical heuristics. The use of persistent homology on molecular graphs, extended by the use of norms on the associated persistence landscapes allow the conversion of discrete shape descriptors to continuous ones, and a perspective of the application of these descriptors to quantitative structure property relations is presented.
  19. Using Multidimensional Topological Data Analysis to Identify Traits of Hip Osteoarthritis (2018)

    Jasmine Rossi‐deVries, Valentina Pedoia, Michael A. Samaan, Adam R. Ferguson, Richard B. Souza, Sharmila Majumdar
    Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifaceted disease with many variables affecting diagnosis and progression. Topological data analysis (TDA) is a state-of-the-art big data analytics tool that can combine all variables into multidimensional space. TDA is used to simultaneously analyze imaging and gait analysis techniques. Purpose To identify biochemical and biomechanical biomarkers able to classify different disease progression phenotypes in subjects with and without radiographic signs of hip OA. Study Type Longitudinal study for comparison of progressive and nonprogressive subjects. Population In all, 102 subjects with and without radiographic signs of hip osteoarthritis. Field Strength/Sequence 3T, SPGR 3D MAPSS T1ρ/T2, intermediate-weighted fat-suppressed fast spin-echo (FSE). Assessment Multidimensional data analysis including cartilage composition, bone shape, Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) classification of osteoarthritis, scoring hip osteoarthritis with MRI (SHOMRI), hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS). Statistical Tests Analysis done using TDA, Kolmogorov–Smirnov (KS) testing, and Benjamini-Hochberg to rank P-value results to correct for multiple comparisons. Results Subjects in the later stages of the disease had an increased SHOMRI score (P \textless 0.0001), increased KL (P = 0.0012), and older age (P \textless 0.0001). Subjects in the healthier group showed intact cartilage and less pain. Subjects found between these two groups had a range of symptoms. Analysis of this subgroup identified knee biomechanics (P \textless 0.0001) as an initial marker of the disease that is noticeable before the morphological progression and degeneration. Further analysis of an OA subgroup with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) showed anterior labral tears to be the most significant marker (P = 0.0017) between those FAI subjects with and without OA symptoms. Data Conclusion The data-driven analysis obtained with TDA proposes new phenotypes of these subjects that partially overlap with the radiographic-based classical disease status classification and also shows the potential for further examination of an early onset biomechanical intervention. Level of Evidence: 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;48:1046–1058.
  20. Identification of Topological Network Modules in Perturbed Protein Interaction Networks (2017)

    Mihaela E. Sardiu, Joshua M. Gilmore, Brad Groppe, Laurence Florens, Michael P. Washburn
    Abstract Biological networks consist of functional modules, however detecting and characterizing such modules in networks remains challenging. Perturbing networks is one strategy for identifying modules. Here we used an advanced mathematical approach named topological data analysis (TDA) to interrogate two perturbed networks. In one, we disrupted the S. cerevisiae INO80 protein interaction network by isolating complexes after protein complex components were deleted from the genome. In the second, we reanalyzed previously published data demonstrating the disruption of the human Sin3 network with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Here we show that disrupted networks contained topological network modules (TNMs) with shared properties that mapped onto distinct locations in networks. We define TMNs as proteins that occupy close network positions depending on their coordinates in a topological space. TNMs provide new insight into networks by capturing proteins from different categories including proteins within a complex, proteins with shared biological functions, and proteins disrupted across networks.
  21. Single-Cell Topological RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Insights Into Cellular Differentiation and Development (2017)

    Abbas H. Rizvi, Pablo G. Camara, Elena K. Kandror, Thomas J. Roberts, Ira Schieren, Tom Maniatis, Raul Rabadan
    Abstract Transcriptional programs control cellular lineage commitment and differentiation during development. Understanding cell fate has been advanced by studying single-cell RNA-seq, but is limited by the assumptions of current analytic methods regarding the structure of data. We present single-cell topological data analysis (scTDA), an algorithm for topology-based computational analyses to study temporal, unbiased transcriptional regulation. Compared to other methods, scTDA is a non-linear, model-independent, unsupervised statistical framework that can characterize transient cellular states. We applied scTDA to the analysis of murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation in vitro in response to inducers of motor neuron differentiation. scTDA resolved asynchrony and continuity in cellular identity over time, and identified four transient states (pluripotent, precursor, progenitor, and fully differentiated cells) based on changes in stage-dependent combinations of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins and long non-coding RNAs. scTDA can be applied to study asynchronous cellular responses to either developmental cues or environmental perturbations.
  22. Identification of Key Features Using Topological Data Analysis for Accurate Prediction of Manufacturing System Outputs (2017)

    Wei Guo, Ashis G. Banerjee
    Abstract Topological data analysis (TDA) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches to extract insights from high-dimensional data of varying types such as images, point clouds, and meshes, in an unsupervised manner. To the best of our knowledge, here, we provide the first successful application of TDA in the manufacturing systems domain. We apply a widely used TDA method, known as the Mapper algorithm, on two benchmark data sets for chemical process yield prediction and semiconductor wafer fault detection, respectively. The algorithm yields topological networks that capture the intrinsic clusters and connections among the clusters present in the data sets, which are difficult to detect using traditional methods. We select key process variables or features that impact the system outcomes by analyzing the network shapes. We then use predictive models to evaluate the impact of the selected features. Results show that the models achieve at least the same level of high prediction accuracy as with all the process variables, thereby, providing a way to carry out process monitoring and control in a more cost-effective manner.
  23. MRI and Biomechanics Multidimensional Data Analysis Reveals R2 -R1ρ as an Early Predictor of Cartilage Lesion Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis (2017)

    Valentina Pedoia, Jenny Haefeli, Kazuhito Morioka, Hsiang-Ling Teng, Lorenzo Nardo, Richard B. Souza, Adam R. Ferguson, Sharmila Majumdar
    Abstract PURPOSE: To couple quantitative compositional MRI, gait analysis, and machine learning multidimensional data analysis to study osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a multifactorial disorder accompanied by biochemical and morphological changes in the articular cartilage, modulated by skeletal biomechanics and gait. While we can now acquire detailed information about the knee joint structure and function, we are not yet able to leverage the multifactorial factors for diagnosis and disease management of knee OA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We mapped 178 subjects in a multidimensional space integrating: demographic, clinical information, gait kinematics and kinetics, cartilage compositional T1ρ and T2 and R2 -R1ρ (1/T2 -1/T1ρ ) acquired at 3T and whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score morphological grading. Topological data analysis (TDA) and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test were adopted for data integration, analysis, and hypothesis generation. Regression models were used for hypothesis testing. RESULTS: The results of the TDA showed a network composed of three main patient subpopulations, thus potentially identifying new phenotypes. T2 and T1ρ values (T2 lateral femur P = 1.45*10-8 , T1ρ medial tibia P = 1.05*10-5 ), the presence of femoral cartilage defects (P = 0.0013), lesions in the meniscus body (P = 0.0035), and race (P = 2.44*10-4 ) were key markers in the subpopulation classification. Within one of the subpopulations we observed an association between the composite metric R2 -R1ρ and the longitudinal progression of cartilage lesions. CONCLUSION: The analysis presented demonstrates some of the complex multitissue biochemical and biomechanical interactions that define joint degeneration and OA using a multidimensional approach, and potentially indicates that R2 -R1ρ may be an imaging biomarker for early OA. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:78-90.
  24. Uncovering Precision Phenotype-Biomarker Associations in Traumatic Brain Injury Using Topological Data Analysis (2017)

    Jessica L. Nielson, Shelly R. Cooper, John K. Yue, Marco D. Sorani, Tomoo Inoue, Esther L. Yuh, Pratik Mukherjee, Tanya C. Petrossian, Jesse Paquette, Pek Y. Lum, Gunnar E. Carlsson, Mary J. Vassar, Hester F. Lingsma, Wayne A. Gordon, Alex B. Valadka, David O. Okonkwo, Geoffrey T. Manley, Adam R. Ferguson, Track-Tbi Investigators
    Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex disorder that is traditionally stratified based on clinical signs and symptoms. Recent imaging and molecular biomarker innovations provide unprecedented opportunities for improved TBI precision medicine, incorporating patho-anatomical and molecular mechanisms. Complete integration of these diverse data for TBI diagnosis and patient stratification remains an unmet challenge. Methods and findings The Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Pilot multicenter study enrolled 586 acute TBI patients and collected diverse common data elements (TBI-CDEs) across the study population, including imaging, genetics, and clinical outcomes. We then applied topology-based data-driven discovery to identify natural subgroups of patients, based on the TBI-CDEs collected. Our hypothesis was two-fold: 1) A machine learning tool known as topological data analysis (TDA) would reveal data-driven patterns in patient outcomes to identify candidate biomarkers of recovery, and 2) TDA-identified biomarkers would significantly predict patient outcome recovery after TBI using more traditional methods of univariate statistical tests. TDA algorithms organized and mapped the data of TBI patients in multidimensional space, identifying a subset of mild TBI patients with a specific multivariate phenotype associated with unfavorable outcome at 3 and 6 months after injury. Further analyses revealed that this patient subset had high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and enrichment in several distinct genetic polymorphisms associated with cellular responses to stress and DNA damage (PARP1), and in striatal dopamine processing (ANKK1, COMT, DRD2). Conclusions TDA identified a unique diagnostic subgroup of patients with unfavorable outcome after mild TBI that were significantly predicted by the presence of specific genetic polymorphisms. Machine learning methods such as TDA may provide a robust method for patient stratification and treatment planning targeting identified biomarkers in future clinical trials in TBI patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01565551
  25. Visualizing Emergent Identity of Assemblages in the Consumer Internet of Things: A Topological Data Analysis Approach (2016)

    Thomas Novak, Donna L. Hoffman
    Abstract The identity of a consumer Internet of Things (IoT) assemblage emerges through a historical process of ongoing interactions among consumers, smart devices, and digital information. Topological Data Analysis (TDA), consistent with mathematical aspects of assemblage theory, is used to visualize the underlying possibility space from which individual IoT assemblages emerge.
  26. Toward Automated Prediction of Manufacturing Productivity Based on Feature Selection Using Topological Data Analysis (2016)

    Wei Guo, Ashis G. Banerjee
    Abstract In this paper, we extend the application of topological data analysis (TDA) to the field of manufacturing for the first time to the best of our knowledge. We apply a particular TDA method, known as the Mapper algorithm, on a benchmark chemical processing data set. The algorithm yields a topological network that captures the intrinsic clusters and connections among the clusters present in the high-dimensional data set, which are difficult to detect using traditional methods. We select key process variables or features that impact the final product yield by analyzing the shape of this network. We then use three prediction models to evaluate the impact of the selected features. Results show that the models achieve the same level of high prediction accuracy as with all the process variables, thereby, providing a way to carry out process monitoring and control in a more cost-effective manner.
  27. Tracking Resilience to Infections by Mapping Disease Space (2016)

    Brenda Y. Torres, Jose Henrique M. Oliveira, Ann Thomas Tate, Poonam Rath, Katherine Cumnock, David S. Schneider
    Abstract Infected hosts differ in their responses to pathogens; some hosts are resilient and recover their original health, whereas others follow a divergent path and die. To quantitate these differences, we propose mapping the routes infected individuals take through “disease space.” We find that when plotting physiological parameters against each other, many pairs have hysteretic relationships that identify the current location of the host and predict the future route of the infection. These maps can readily be constructed from experimental longitudinal data, and we provide two methods to generate the maps from the cross-sectional data that is commonly gathered in field trials. We hypothesize that resilient hosts tend to take small loops through disease space, whereas nonresilient individuals take large loops. We support this hypothesis with experimental data in mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi, finding that dying mice trace a large arc in red blood cells (RBCs) by reticulocyte space as compared to surviving mice. We find that human malaria patients who are heterozygous for sickle cell hemoglobin occupy a small area of RBCs by reticulocyte space, suggesting this approach can be used to distinguish resilience in human populations. This technique should be broadly useful in describing the in-host dynamics of infections in both model hosts and patients at both population and individual levels.
  28. WDR76 Co-Localizes With Heterochromatin Related Proteins and Rapidly Responds to DNA Damage (2016)

    Joshua M. Gilmore, Mihaela E. Sardiu, Brad D. Groppe, Janet L. Thornton, Xingyu Liu, Gerald Dayebgadoh, Charles A. Banks, Brian D. Slaughter, Jay R. Unruh, Jerry L. Workman, Laurence Florens, Michael P. Washburn
    Abstract Proteins that respond to DNA damage play critical roles in normal and diseased states in human biology. Studies have suggested that the S. cerevisiae protein CMR1/YDL156w is associated with histones and is possibly associated with DNA repair and replication processes. Through a quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity purifications here we show that the human homologue of this protein, WDR76, shares multiple protein associations with the histones H2A, H2B, and H4. Furthermore, our quantitative proteomic analysis of WDR76 associated proteins demonstrated links to proteins in the DNA damage response like PARP1 and XRCC5 and heterochromatin related proteins like CBX1, CBX3, and CBX5. Co-immunoprecipitation studies validated these interactions. Next, quantitative imaging studies demonstrated that WDR76 was recruited to laser induced DNA damage immediately after induction, and we compared the recruitment of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage to known DNA damage proteins like PARP1, XRCC5, and RPA1. In addition, WDR76 co-localizes to puncta with the heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX5, which are also recruited to DNA damage but much less intensely than WDR76. This work demonstrates the chromatin and DNA damage protein associations of WDR76 and demonstrates the rapid response of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage.
  29. Topological Data Analysis: A Promising Big Data Exploration Tool in Biology, Analytical Chemistry and Physical Chemistry (2016)

    Marc Offroy, Ludovic Duponchel
    Abstract An important feature of experimental science is that data of various kinds is being produced at an unprecedented rate. This is mainly due to the development of new instrumental concepts and experimental methodologies. It is also clear that the nature of acquired data is significantly different. Indeed in every areas of science, data take the form of always bigger tables, where all but a few of the columns (i.e. variables) turn out to be irrelevant to the questions of interest, and further that we do not necessary know which coordinates are the interesting ones. Big data in our lab of biology, analytical chemistry or physical chemistry is a future that might be closer than any of us suppose. It is in this sense that new tools have to be developed in order to explore and valorize such data sets. Topological data analysis (TDA) is one of these. It was developed recently by topologists who discovered that topological concept could be useful for data analysis. The main objective of this paper is to answer the question why topology is well suited for the analysis of big data set in many areas and even more efficient than conventional data analysis methods. Raman analysis of single bacteria should be providing a good opportunity to demonstrate the potential of TDA for the exploration of various spectroscopic data sets considering different experimental conditions (with high noise level, with/without spectral preprocessing, with wavelength shift, with different spectral resolution, with missing data).
  30. Topological Data Analysis for Discovery in Preclinical Spinal Cord Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury (2015)

    Jessica L. Nielson, Jesse Paquette, Aiwen W. Liu, Cristian F. Guandique, C. Amy Tovar, Tomoo Inoue, Karen-Amanda Irvine, John C. Gensel, Jennifer Kloke, Tanya C. Petrossian, Pek Y. Lum, Gunnar E. Carlsson, Geoffrey T. Manley, Wise Young, Michael S. Beattie, Jacqueline C. Bresnahan, Adam R. Ferguson
    Abstract Data-driven discovery in complex neurological disorders has potential to extract meaningful knowledge from large, heterogeneous datasets. Here the authors apply topological data analysis to assess therapeutic effects in preclinical traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury research studies.
  31. Conserved Abundance and Topological Features in Chromatin-Remodeling Protein Interaction Networks (2015)

    Mihaela E Sardiu, Joshua M Gilmore, Brad D Groppe, Damir Herman, Sreenivasa R Ramisetty, Yong Cai, Jingji Jin, Ronald C Conaway, Joan W Conaway, Laurence Florens, Michael P Washburn
    Abstract Abstract The study of conserved protein interaction networks seeks to better understand the evolution and regulation of protein interactions. Here, we present a quantitative proteomic analysis of 18 orthologous baits from three distinct chromatin-remodeling complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens. We demonstrate that abundance levels of orthologous proteins correlate strongly between the two organisms and both networks have highly similar topologies. We therefore used the protein abundances in one species to cross-predict missing protein abundance levels in the other species. Lastly, we identified a novel conserved low-abundance subnetwork further demonstrating the value of quantitative analysis of networks.
  32. Topic Detection in Twitter Using Topology Data Analysis (2015)

    Pablo Torres-Tramón, Hugo Hromic, Bahareh Rahmanzadeh Heravi
    Abstract The massive volume of content generated by social media greatly exceeds human capacity to manually process this data in order to identify topics of interest. As a solution, various automated topic detection approaches have been proposed, most of which are based on document clustering and burst detection. These approaches normally represent textual features in standard n-dimensional Euclidean metric spaces. However, in these cases, directly filtering noisy documents is challenging for topic detection. Instead we propose Topol, a topic detection method based on Topology Data Analysis (TDA) that transforms the Euclidean feature space into a topological space where the shapes of noisy irrelevant documents are much easier to distinguish from topically-relevant documents. This topological space is organised in a network according to the connectivity of the points, i.e. the documents, and by only filtering based on the size of the connected components we obtain competitive results compared to other state of the art topic detection methods.
  33. Topographical Transcriptome Mapping of the Mouse Medial Ganglionic Eminence by Spatially Resolved RNA-seq (2014)

    Sabrina Zechel, Pawel Zajac, Peter Lönnerberg, Carlos F. Ibáñez, Sten Linnarsson
    Abstract Cortical interneurons originating from the medial ganglionic eminence, MGE, are among the most diverse cells within the CNS. Different pools of proliferating progenitor cells are thought to exist in the ventricular zone of the MGE, but whether the underlying subventricular and mantle regions of the MGE are spatially patterned has not yet been addressed. Here, we combined laser-capture microdissection and multiplex RNA-sequencing to map the transcriptome of MGE cells at a spatial resolution of 50 μm.
  34. Topological Pattern Recognition for Point Cloud Data* (2014)

    Gunnar Carlsson
    Abstract In this paper we discuss the adaptation of the methods of homology from algebraic topology to the problem of pattern recognition in point cloud data sets. The method is referred to as persistent homology, and has numerous applications to scientific problems. We discuss the definition and computation of homology in the standard setting of simplicial complexes and topological spaces, then show how one can obtain useful signatures, called barcodes, from finite metric spaces, thought of as sampled from a continuous object. We present several different cases where persistent homology is used, to illustrate the different ways in which the method can be applied.
  35. Reconceiving the Hippocampal Map as a Topological Template (2014)

    Yuri Dabaghian, Vicky L. Brandt, Loren M. Frank
    Abstract The role of the hippocampus in spatial cognition is incontrovertible yet controversial. Place cells, initially thought to be location-specifiers, turn out to respond promiscuously to a wide range of stimuli. Here we test the idea, which we have recently demonstrated in a computational model, that the hippocampal place cells may ultimately be interested in a space's topological qualities (its connectivity) more than its geometry (distances and angles); such higher-order functioning would be more consistent with other known hippocampal functions. We recorded place cell activity in rats exploring morphing linear tracks that allowed us to dissociate the geometry of the track from its topology. The resulting place fields preserved the relative sequence of places visited along the track but did not vary with the metrical features of the track or the direction of the rat's movement. These results suggest a reinterpretation of previous studies and new directions for future experiments.
  36. CD8 T-Cell Reactivity to Islet Antigens Is Unique to Type 1 While CD4 T-Cell Reactivity Exists in Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes (2014)

    Ghanashyam Sarikonda, Jeremy Pettus, Sonal Phatak, Sowbarnika Sachithanantham, Jacqueline F. Miller, Johnna D. Wesley, Eithon Cadag, Ji Chae, Lakshmi Ganesan, Ronna Mallios, Steve Edelman, Bjoern Peters, Matthias von Herrath
    Abstract Previous cross-sectional analyses demonstrated that CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell reactivity to islet-specific antigens was more prevalent in T1D subjects than in healthy donors (HD). Here, we examined T1D-associated epitope-specific CD4+ T-cell cytokine production and autoreactive CD8+ T-cell frequency on a monthly basis for one year in 10 HD, 33 subjects with T1D, and 15 subjects with T2D. Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells from both T1D and T2D subjects produced more IFN-γ when stimulated than cells from HD. In contrast, higher frequencies of islet antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells were detected only in T1D. These observations support the hypothesis that general beta-cell stress drives autoreactive CD4+ T-cell activity while islet over-expression of MHC class I commonly seen in T1D mediates amplification of CD8+ T-cells and more rapid beta-cell loss. In conclusion, CD4+ T-cell autoreactivity appears to be present in both T1D and T2D while autoreactive CD8+ T-cells are unique to T1D. Thus, autoreactive CD8+ cells may serve as a more T1D-specific biomarker.
  37. Topological Methods Reveal High and Low Functioning Neuro-Phenotypes Within Fragile X Syndrome (2014)

    David Romano, Monica Nicolau, Eve-Marie Quintin, Paul K. Mazaika, Amy A. Lightbody, Heather Cody Hazlett, Joseph Piven, Gunnar Carlsson, Allan L. Reiss
    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS), due to mutations of the FMR1 gene, is the most common known inherited cause of developmental disability as well as the most common single-gene risk factor for autism. Our goal was to examine variation in brain structure in FXS with topological data analysis (TDA), and to assess how such variation is associated with measures of IQ and autism-related behaviors. To this end, we analyzed imaging and behavioral data from young boys (n = 52; aged 1.57–4.15 years) diagnosed with FXS. Application of topological methods to structural MRI data revealed two large subgroups within the study population. Comparison of these subgroups showed significant between-subgroup neuroanatomical differences similar to those previously reported to distinguish children with FXS from typically developing controls (e.g., enlarged caudate). In addition to neuroanatomy, the groups showed significant differences in IQ and autism severity scores. These results suggest that despite arising from a single gene mutation, FXS may encompass two biologically, and clinically separable phenotypes. In addition, these findings underscore the potential of TDA as a powerful tool in the search for biological phenotypes of neuropsychiatric disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 35:4904–4915, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  38. Topological Data Analysis of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Non-O157 Survival in Soils (2014)

    Abasiofiok M. Ibekwe, Jincai Ma, David E. Crowley, Ching-Hong Yang, Alexis M. Johnson, Tanya C. Petrossian, Pek Y. Lum
    Abstract Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 have been implicated in many foodborne illnesses caused by the consumption of contaminated fresh produce. However, data on their persistence in soils are limited due to the complexity in datasets generated from different environmental variables and bacterial taxa. There is a continuing need to distinguish the various environmental variables and different bacterial groups to understand the relationships among these factors and the pathogen survival. Using an approach called Topological Data Analysis (TDA); we reconstructed the relationship structure of E. coli O157 and non-O157 survival in 32 soils (16 organic and 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) with a multi-resolution output. In our study, we took a community approach based on total soil microbiome to study community level survival and examining the network of the community as a whole and the relationship between its topology and biological processes. TDA produces a geometric representation of complex data sets. Network analysis showed that Shiga toxin negative strain E. coli O157:H7 4554 survived significantly longer in comparison to E. coli O157:H7 EDL933, while the survival time of E. coli O157:NM was comparable to that of E. coli O157:H7 strain 933 in all of the tested soils. Two non-O157 strains, E. coli O26:H11 and E. coli O103:H2 survived much longer than E. coli O91:H21 and the three strains of E. coli O157. We show that there are complex interactions between E. coli strain survival, microbial community structures, and soil parameters.
  39. Extracting Insights From the Shape of Complex Data Using Topology (2013)

    P. Y. Lum, G. Singh, A. Lehman, T. Ishkanov, M. Vejdemo-Johansson, M. Alagappan, J. Carlsson, G. Carlsson
    Abstract This paper applies topological methods to study complex high dimensional data sets by extracting shapes (patterns) and obtaining insights about them. Our method combines the best features of existing standard methodologies such as principal component and cluster analyses to provide a geometric representation of complex data sets. Through this hybrid method, we often find subgroups in data sets that traditional methodologies fail to find. Our method also permits the analysis of individual data sets as well as the analysis of relationships between related data sets. We illustrate the use of our method by applying it to three very different kinds of data, namely gene expression from breast tumors, voting data from the United States House of Representatives and player performance data from the NBA, in each case finding stratifications of the data which are more refined than those produced by standard methods.
  40. Topology Based Data Analysis Identifies a Subgroup of Breast Cancers With a Unique Mutational Profile and Excellent Survival (2011)

    Monica Nicolau, Arnold J. Levine, Gunnar Carlsson
    Abstract High-throughput biological data, whether generated as sequencing, transcriptional microarrays, proteomic, or other means, continues to require analytic methods that address its high dimensional aspects. Because the computational part of data analysis ultimately identifies shape characteristics in the organization of data sets, the mathematics of shape recognition in high dimensions continues to be a crucial part of data analysis. This article introduces a method that extracts information from high-throughput microarray data and, by using topology, provides greater depth of information than current analytic techniques. The method, termed Progression Analysis of Disease (PAD), first identifies robust aspects of cluster analysis, then goes deeper to find a multitude of biologically meaningful shape characteristics in these data. Additionally, because PAD incorporates a visualization tool, it provides a simple picture or graph that can be used to further explore these data. Although PAD can be applied to a wide range of high-throughput data types, it is used here as an example to analyze breast cancer transcriptional data. This identified a unique subgroup of Estrogen Receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers that express high levels of c-MYB and low levels of innate inflammatory genes. These patients exhibit 100% survival and no metastasis. No supervised step beyond distinction between tumor and healthy patients was used to identify this subtype. The group has a clear and distinct, statistically significant molecular signature, it highlights coherent biology but is invisible to cluster methods, and does not fit into the accepted classification of Luminal A/B, Normal-like subtypes of ER+ breast cancers. We denote the group as c-MYB+ breast cancer.
  41. Structural Insight Into RNA Hairpin Folding Intermediates (2008)

    Gregory R. Bowman, Xuhui Huang, Yuan Yao, Jian Sun, Gunnar Carlsson, Leonidas J. Guibas, Vijay S. Pande
    Abstract , Hairpins are a ubiquitous secondary structure motif in RNA molecules. Despite their simple structure, there is some debate over whether they fold in a two-state or multi-state manner. We have studied the folding of a small tetraloop hairpin using a serial version of replica exchange molecular dynamics on a distributed computing environment. On the basis of these simulations, we have identified a number of intermediates that are consistent with experimental results. We also find that folding is not simply the reverse of high-temperature unfolding and suggest that this may be a general feature of biomolecular folding.
  42. Topological Methods for the Analysis of High Dimensional Data Sets and 3D Object Recognition (2007)

    Gurjeet Singh, Facundo Mémoli, Gunnar Carlsson
    Abstract We present a computational method for extracting simple descriptions of high dimensional data sets in the form of simplicial complexes. Our method, called Mapper, is based on the idea of partial clustering of the data guided by a set of functions defined on the data. The proposed method is not dependent on any particular clustering algorithm, i.e. any clustering algorithm may be used with Mapper. We implement this method and present a few sample applications in which simple descriptions of the data present important information about its structure.