🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001392s)
  1. Transfer Learning for Autonomous Chatter Detection in Machining (2022)

    Melih C. Yesilli, Firas A. Khasawneh, Brian P. Mann
    Abstract Large-amplitude chatter vibrations are one of the most important phenomena in machining processes. It is often detrimental in cutting operations causing a poor surface finish and decreased tool life. Therefore, chatter detection using machine learning has been an active research area over the last decade. Three challenges can be identified in applying machine learning for chatter detection at large in industry: an insufficient understanding of the universality of chatter features across different processes, the need for automating feature extraction, and the existence of limited data for each specific workpiece-machine tool combination, e.g., when machining one-off products. These three challenges can be grouped under the umbrella of transfer learning, which is concerned with studying how knowledge gained from one setting can be leveraged to obtain information in new settings. This paper studies automating chatter detection by evaluating transfer learning of prominent as well as novel chatter detection methods. We investigate chatter classification accuracy using a variety of features extracted from turning and milling experiments with different cutting configurations. The studied methods include Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Power Spectral Density (PSD), the Auto-correlation Function (ACF), and decomposition based tools such as Wavelet Packet Transform (WPT) and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD). We also examine more recent approaches based on Topological Data Analysis (TDA) and similarity measures of time series based on Discrete Time Warping (DTW). We evaluate transfer learning potential of each approach by training and testing both within and across the turning and milling data sets. Four supervised classification algorithms are explored: support vector machine (SVM), logistic regression, random forest classification, and gradient boosting. In addition to accuracy, we also comment on the automation potential of feature extraction for each approach which is integral to creating autonomous manufacturing centers. Our results show that carefully chosen time-frequency features can lead to high classification accuracies albeit at the cost of requiring manual pre-processing and the tagging of an expert user. On the other hand, we found that the TDA and DTW approaches can provide accuracies and F1-scores on par with the time-frequency methods without the need for manual preprocessing via completely automatic pipelines. Further, we discovered that the DTW approach outperforms all other methods when trained using the milling data and tested on the turning data. Therefore, TDA and DTW approaches may be preferred over the time-frequency-based approaches for fully automated chatter detection schemes. DTW and TDA also can be more advantageous when pooling data from either limited workpiece-machine tool combinations, or from small data sets of one-off processes.
  2. Chatter Classification in Turning Using Machine Learning and Topological Data Analysis (2018)

    Firas A. Khasawneh, Elizabeth Munch, Jose A. Perea
    Abstract Chatter identification and detection in machining processes has been an active area of research in the past two decades. Part of the challenge in studying chatter is that machining equations that describe its occurrence are often nonlinear delay differential equations. The majority of the available tools for chatter identification rely on defining a metric that captures the characteristics of chatter, and a threshold that signals its occurrence. The difficulty in choosing these parameters can be somewhat alleviated by utilizing machine learning techniques. However, even with a successful classification algorithm, the transferability of typical machine learning methods from one data set to another remains very limited. In this paper we combine supervised machine learning with Topological Data Analysis (TDA) to obtain a descriptor of the process which can detect chatter. The features we use are derived from the persistence diagram of an attractor reconstructed from the time series via Takens embedding. We test the approach using deterministic and stochastic turning models, where the stochasticity is introduced via the cutting coefficient term. Our results show a 97% successful classification rate on the deterministic model labeled by the stability diagram obtained using the spectral element method. The features gleaned from the deterministic model are then utilized for characterization of chatter in a stochastic turning model where there are very limited analysis methods.
  3. Chatter Detection in Turning Using Persistent Homology (2016)

    Firas A. Khasawneh, Elizabeth Munch
    Abstract This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.