🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 10 matches in 0.003039s)
  1. A Novel Quality Clustering Methodology on Fab-Wide Wafer Map Images in Semiconductor Manufacturing (2022)

    Yuan-Ming Hsu, Xiaodong Jia, Wenzhe Li, Jay Lee
    Abstract Abstract. In semiconductor manufacturing, clustering the fab-wide wafer map images is of critical importance for practitioners to understand the subclusters of wafer defects, recognize novel clusters or anomalies, and develop fast reactions to quality issues. However, due to the high-mix manufacturing of diversified wafer products of different sizes and technologies, it is difficult to cluster the wafer map images across the fab. This paper addresses this challenge by proposing a novel methodology for fab-wide wafer map data clustering. In the proposed methodology, a well-known deep learning technique, vision transformer with multi-head attention is first trained to convert binary wafer images of different sizes into condensed feature vectors for efficient clustering. Then, the Topological Data Analysis (TDA), which is widely used in biomedical applications, is employed to visualize the data clusters and identify the anomalies. The TDA yields a topological representation of high-dimensional big data as well as its local clusters by creating a graph that shows nodes corresponding to the clusters within the data. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated by clustering the public wafer map dataset WM-811k from the real application which has a total of 811,457 wafer map images. We further demonstrate the potential applicability of topology data analytics in the semiconductor area by visualization.
  2. Topological Data Analysis for Electric Motor Eccentricity Fault Detection (2022)

    Bingnan Wang, Chungwei Lin, Hiroshi Inoue, Makoto Kanemaru
    Abstract In this paper, we develop topological data analysis (TDA) method for motor current signature analysis (MCSA), and apply it to induction motor eccentricity fault detection. We introduce TDA and present the procedure of extracting topological features from time-domain data that will be represented using persistence diagrams and vectorized Betti sequences. The procedure is applied to induction machine phase current signal analysis, and shown to be highly effective in differentiating signals from different eccentricity levels. With TDA, we are able to use a simple regression model that can predict the fault levels with reasonable accuracy, even for the data of eccentricity levels that are not seen in the training data. The proposed method is model-free, and only requires a small segment of time-domain data to make prediction. These advantages make it attractive for a wide range of fault detection applications.
  3. Persistent Homology Based Graph Convolution Network for Fine-Grained 3D Shape Segmentation (2021)

    Chi-Chong Wong, Chi-Man Vong
    Abstract Fine-grained 3D segmentation is an important task in 3D object understanding, especially in applications such as intelligent manufacturing or parts analysis for 3D objects. However, many challenges involved in such problem are yet to be solved, such as i) interpreting the complex structures located in different regions for 3D objects; ii) capturing fine-grained structures with sufficient topology correctness. Current deep learning and graph machine learning methods fail to tackle such challenges and thus provide inferior performance in fine-grained 3D analysis. In this work, methods in topological data analysis are incorporated with geometric deep learning model for the task of fine-grained segmentation for 3D objects. We propose a novel neural network model called Persistent Homology based Graph Convolution Network (PHGCN), which i) integrates persistent homology into graph convolution network to capture multi-scale structural information that can accurately represent complex structures for 3D objects; ii) applies a novel Persistence Diagram Loss (ℒPD) that provides sufficient topology correctness for segmentation over the fine-grained structures. Extensive experiments on fine-grained 3D segmentation validate the effectiveness of the proposed PHGCN model and show significant improvements over current state-of-the-art methods.
  4. Dynamic State Analysis of a Driven Magnetic Pendulum Using Ordinal Partition Networks and Topological Data Analysis (2020)

    Audun Myers, Firas A. Khasawneh
    Abstract Abstract. The use of complex networks for time series analysis has recently shown to be useful as a tool for detecting dynamic state changes for a wide variety of applications. In this work, we implement the commonly used ordinal partition network to transform a time series into a network for detecting these state changes for the simple magnetic pendulum. The time series that we used are obtained experimentally from a base-excited magnetic pendulum apparatus, and numerically from the corresponding governing equations. The magnetic pendulum provides a relatively simple, non-linear example demonstrating transitions from periodic to chaotic motion with the variation of system parameters. For our method, we implement persistent homology, a shape measuring tool from Topological Data Analysis (TDA), to summarize the shape of the resulting ordinal partition networks as a tool for detecting state changes. We show that this network analysis tool provides a clear distinction between periodic and chaotic time series. Another contribution of this work is the successful application of the networks-TDA pipeline, for the first time, to signals from non-autonomous nonlinear systems. This opens the door for our approach to be used as an automatic design tool for studying the effect of design parameters on the resulting system response. Other uses of this approach include fault detection from sensor signals in a wide variety of engineering operations.
  5. A Classification of Topological Discrepancies in Additive Manufacturing (2019)

    Morad Behandish, Amir M. Mirzendehdel, Saigopal Nelaturi
    Abstract Additive manufacturing (AM) enables enormous freedom for design of complex structures. However, the process-dependent limitations that result in discrepancies between as-designed and as-manufactured shapes are not fully understood. The tradeoffs between infinitely many different ways to approximate a design by a manufacturable replica are even harder to characterize. To support design for AM (DfAM), one has to quantify local discrepancies introduced by AM processes, identify the detrimental deviations (if any) to the original design intent, and prescribe modifications to the design and/or process parameters to countervail their effects. Our focus in this work will be on topological analysis. There is ample evidence in many applications that preserving local topology (e.g., connectivity of beams in a lattice) is important even when slight geometric deviations can be tolerated. We first present a generic method to characterize local topological discrepancies due to material under-and over-deposition in AM, and show how it captures various types of defects in the as-manufactured structures. We use this information to systematically modify the as-manufactured outcomes within the limitations of available 3D printer resolution(s), which often comes at the expense of introducing more geometric deviations (e.g., thickening a beam to avoid disconnection). We validate the effectiveness of the method on 3D examples with nontrivial topologies such as lattice structures and foams.
  6. Topological Data Analysis for True Step Detection in Periodic Piecewise Constant Signals (2018)

    Firas A. Khasawneh, Elizabeth Munch
    Abstract This paper introduces a simple yet powerful approach based on topological data analysis for detecting true steps in a periodic, piecewise constant (PWC) signal. The signal is a two-state square wave with randomly varying in-between-pulse spacing, subject to spurious steps at the rising or falling edges which we call digital ringing. We use persistent homology to derive mathematical guarantees for the resulting change detection which enables accurate identification and counting of the true pulses. The approach is tested using both synthetic and experimental data obtained using an engine lathe instrumented with a laser tachometer. The described algorithm enables accurate and automatic calculations of the spindle speed without any choice of parameters. The results are compared with the frequency and sequency methods of the Fourier and Walsh–Hadamard transforms, respectively. Both our approach and the Fourier analysis yield comparable results for pulses with regular spacing and digital ringing while the latter causes large errors using the Walsh–Hadamard method. Further, the described approach significantly outperforms the frequency/sequency analyses when the spacing between the peaks is varied. We discuss generalizing the approach to higher dimensional PWC signals, although using this extension remains an interesting question for future research.
  7. Chatter Classification in Turning Using Machine Learning and Topological Data Analysis (2018)

    Firas A. Khasawneh, Elizabeth Munch, Jose A. Perea
    Abstract Chatter identification and detection in machining processes has been an active area of research in the past two decades. Part of the challenge in studying chatter is that machining equations that describe its occurrence are often nonlinear delay differential equations. The majority of the available tools for chatter identification rely on defining a metric that captures the characteristics of chatter, and a threshold that signals its occurrence. The difficulty in choosing these parameters can be somewhat alleviated by utilizing machine learning techniques. However, even with a successful classification algorithm, the transferability of typical machine learning methods from one data set to another remains very limited. In this paper we combine supervised machine learning with Topological Data Analysis (TDA) to obtain a descriptor of the process which can detect chatter. The features we use are derived from the persistence diagram of an attractor reconstructed from the time series via Takens embedding. We test the approach using deterministic and stochastic turning models, where the stochasticity is introduced via the cutting coefficient term. Our results show a 97% successful classification rate on the deterministic model labeled by the stability diagram obtained using the spectral element method. The features gleaned from the deterministic model are then utilized for characterization of chatter in a stochastic turning model where there are very limited analysis methods.
  8. Shape Terra: Mechanical Feature Recognition Based on a Persistent Heat Signature (2017)

    Ramy Harik, Yang Shi, Stephen Baek
    Abstract This paper presents a novel approach to recognizing mechanical features through a multiscale persistent heat signature similarity identification technique. First, heat signature is computed using a modified Laplacian in the application of the heat kernel. Regularly, matrices tend to include an indicator to the manifold curvature (the cotangent in our case), but we add a mesh uniformity factor to overcome mesh proportionality and skewness. Second, once heat retention values are computed, we apply persistent homology to extract significant subsets of the global mesh at different time intervals. Subsets are computed based on similarity of heat retention levels and/or retention values. Third, we present a multiscale persistence identification approach where we scan the part at different persistence levels to detect the presence of a feature. Once features are recognized and their geometrical descriptors identified, the next stage in future work will be feature matching.
  9. Raw Material Flow Optimization as a Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem: A Visual Benchmarking Approach for Sustainable Manufacturing (2017)

    Michele Dassisti, Yasamin Eslami, Matin Mohaghegh
    Abstract Optimisation problem concerning material flows, to increase the efficiency while reducing relative resource consumption is one of the most pressing problems today. The focus point of this study is to propose a new visual benchmarking approach to select the best material-flow path from the depot to the production lines, referring to the well-known Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP). An example industrial case study is considered to this aim. Two different solution techniques were adopted (namely Mixed Integer Linear Programming and the Ant Colony Optimization) in searching optimal solutions to the CVRP. The visual benchmarking proposed, based on the persistent homology approach, allowed to support the comparison of the optimal solutions based on the entropy of the output in different scenarios. Finally, based on the non-standard measurements of Crossing Length Percentage (CLP), the visual benchmarking procedure makes it possible to find the most practical and applicable solution to CVRP by considering the visual attractiveness and the quality of the routes.
  10. Identification of Key Features Using Topological Data Analysis for Accurate Prediction of Manufacturing System Outputs (2017)

    Wei Guo, Ashis G. Banerjee
    Abstract Topological data analysis (TDA) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches to extract insights from high-dimensional data of varying types such as images, point clouds, and meshes, in an unsupervised manner. To the best of our knowledge, here, we provide the first successful application of TDA in the manufacturing systems domain. We apply a widely used TDA method, known as the Mapper algorithm, on two benchmark data sets for chemical process yield prediction and semiconductor wafer fault detection, respectively. The algorithm yields topological networks that capture the intrinsic clusters and connections among the clusters present in the data sets, which are difficult to detect using traditional methods. We select key process variables or features that impact the system outcomes by analyzing the network shapes. We then use predictive models to evaluate the impact of the selected features. Results show that the models achieve at least the same level of high prediction accuracy as with all the process variables, thereby, providing a way to carry out process monitoring and control in a more cost-effective manner.