🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001668s)
  1. The Classification of Endoscopy Images With Persistent Homology (2016)

    Olga Dunaeva, Herbert Edelsbrunner, Anton Lukyanov, Michael Machin, Daria Malkova, Roman Kuvaev, Sergey Kashin
    Abstract Aiming at the automatic diagnosis of tumors using narrow band imaging (NBI) magnifying endoscopic (ME) images of the stomach, we combine methods from image processing, topology, geometry, and machine learning to classify patterns into three classes: oval, tubular and irregular. Training the algorithm on a small number of images of each type, we achieve a high rate of correct classifications. The analysis of the learning algorithm reveals that a handful of geometric and topological features are responsible for the overwhelming majority of decisions.
  2. Theory and Algorithms for Constructing Discrete Morse Complexes From Grayscale Digital Images (2011)

    V. Robins, P. J. Wood, A. P. Sheppard
    Abstract We present an algorithm for determining the Morse complex of a two or three-dimensional grayscale digital image. Each cell in the Morse complex corresponds to a topological change in the level sets (i.e., a critical point) of the grayscale image. Since more than one critical point may be associated with a single image voxel, we model digital images by cubical complexes. A new homotopic algorithm is used to construct a discrete Morse function on the cubical complex that agrees with the digital image and has exactly the number and type of critical cells necessary to characterize the topological changes in the level sets. We make use of discrete Morse theory and simple homotopy theory to prove correctness of this algorithm. The resulting Morse complex is considerably simpler than the cubical complex originally used to represent the image and may be used to compute persistent homology.
  3. Computing Robustness and Persistence for Images (2010)

    P. Bendich, H. Edelsbrunner, M. Kerber
    Abstract We are interested in 3-dimensional images given as arrays of voxels with intensity values. Extending these values to a continuous function, we study the robustness of homology classes in its level and interlevel sets, that is, the amount of perturbation needed to destroy these classes. The structure of the homology classes and their robustness, over all level and interlevel sets, can be visualized by a triangular diagram of dots obtained by computing the extended persistence of the function. We give a fast hierarchical algorithm using the dual complexes of oct-tree approximations of the function. In addition, we show that for balanced oct-trees, the dual complexes are geometrically realized in R3 and can thus be used to construct level and interlevel sets. We apply these tools to study 3-dimensional images of plant root systems.