🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 19 matches in 0.012051s)
  1. A Primer on Topological Data Analysis to Support Image Analysis Tasks in Environmental Science (2023)

    Lander Ver Hoef, Henry Adams, Emily J. King, Imme Ebert-Uphoff
    Abstract Abstract Topological data analysis (TDA) is a tool from data science and mathematics that is beginning to make waves in environmental science. In this work, we seek to provide an intuitive and understandable introduction to a tool from TDA that is particularly useful for the analysis of imagery, namely, persistent homology. We briefly discuss the theoretical background but focus primarily on understanding the output of this tool and discussing what information it can glean. To this end, we frame our discussion around a guiding example of classifying satellite images from the sugar, fish, flower, and gravel dataset produced for the study of mesoscale organization of clouds by Rasp et al. We demonstrate how persistent homology and its vectorization, persistence landscapes, can be used in a workflow with a simple machine learning algorithm to obtain good results, and we explore in detail how we can explain this behavior in terms of image-level features. One of the core strengths of persistent homology is how interpretable it can be, so throughout this paper we discuss not just the patterns we find but why those results are to be expected given what we know about the theory of persistent homology. Our goal is that readers of this paper will leave with a better understanding of TDA and persistent homology, will be able to identify problems and datasets of their own for which persistent homology could be helpful, and will gain an understanding of the results they obtain from applying the included GitHub example code. Significance Statement Information such as the geometric structure and texture of image data can greatly support the inference of the physical state of an observed Earth system, for example, in remote sensing to determine whether wildfires are active or to identify local climate zones. Persistent homology is a branch of topological data analysis that allows one to extract such information in an interpretable way—unlike black-box methods like deep neural networks. The purpose of this paper is to explain in an intuitive manner what persistent homology is and how researchers in environmental science can use it to create interpretable models. We demonstrate the approach to identify certain cloud patterns from satellite imagery and find that the resulting model is indeed interpretable.
  2. Feature Detection and Hypothesis Testing for Extremely Noisy Nanoparticle Images Using Topological Data Analysis (2023)

    Andrew M. Thomas, Peter A. Crozier, Yuchen Xu, David S. Matteson
    Abstract We propose a flexible algorithm for feature detection and hypothesis testing in images with ultra-low signal-to-noise ratio using cubical persistent homology. Our main application is in the identification of atomic columns and other features in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Cubical persistent homology is used to identify local minima and their size in subregions in the frames of nanoparticle videos, which are hypothesized to correspond to relevant atomic features. We compare the performance of our algorithm to other employed methods for the detection of columns and their intensity. Additionally, Monte Carlo goodness-of-fit testing using real-valued summaries of persistence diagrams derived from smoothed images (generated from pixels residing in the vacuum region of an image) is developed and employed to identify whether or not the proposed atomic features generated by our algorithm are due to noise. Using these summaries derived from the generated persistence diagrams, one can produce univariate time series for the nanoparticle videos, thus, providing a means for assessing fluxional behavior. A guarantee on the false discovery rate for multiple Monte Carlo testing of identical hypotheses is also established.

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  3. Topology-Aware Segmentation Using Discrete Morse Theory (2021)

    Xiaoling Hu, Yusu Wang, Li Fuxin, Dimitris Samaras, Chao Chen
    Abstract In the segmentation of fine-scale structures from natural and biomedical images, per-pixel accuracy is not the only metric of concern. Topological correctness, such as vessel connectivity and membrane closure, is crucial for downstream analysis tasks. In this paper, we propose a new approach to train deep image segmentation networks for better topological accuracy. In particular, leveraging the power of discrete Morse theory (DMT), we identify global structures, including 1D skeletons and 2D patches, which are important for topological accuracy. Trained with a novel loss based on these global structures, the network performance is significantly improved especially near topologically challenging locations (such as weak spots of connections and membranes). On diverse datasets, our method achieves superior performance on both the DICE score and topological metrics.
  4. Cubical Ripser: Software for Computing Persistent Homology of Image and Volume Data (2020)

    Shizuo Kaji, Takeki Sudo, Kazushi Ahara
    Abstract We introduce Cubical Ripser for computing persistent homology of image and volume data. To our best knowledge, Cubical Ripser is currently the fastest and the most memory-efficient program for computing persistent homology of image and volume data. We demonstrate our software with an example of image analysis in which persistent homology and convolutional neural networks are successfully combined. Our open source implementation is available at [14].
  5. Hypothesis Testing for Shapes Using Vectorized Persistence Diagrams (2020)

    Chul Moon, Nicole A. Lazar
    Abstract Topological data analysis involves the statistical characterization of the shape of data. Persistent homology is a primary tool of topological data analysis, which can be used to analyze those topological features and perform statistical inference. In this paper, we present a two-stage hypothesis test for vectorized persistence diagrams. The first stage filters elements in the vectorized persistence diagrams to reduce false positives. The second stage consists of multiple hypothesis tests, with false positives controlled by false discovery rates. We demonstrate applications of the proposed procedure on simulated point clouds and three-dimensional rock image data. Our results show that the proposed hypothesis tests can provide flexible and informative inferences on the shape of data with lower computational cost compared to the permutation test.
  6. Topological Persistence for Relating Microstructure and Capillary Fluid Trapping in Sandstones (2019)

    A. L. Herring, V. Robins, A. P. Sheppard
    Abstract Results from a series of two-phase fluid flow experiments in Leopard, Berea, and Bentheimer sandstones are presented. Fluid configurations are characterized using laboratory-based and synchrotron based 3-D X-ray computed tomography. All flow experiments are conducted under capillary-dominated conditions. We conduct geometry-topology analysis via persistent homology and compare this to standard topological and watershed-partition-based pore-network statistics. Metrics identified as predictors of nonwetting fluid trapping are calculated from the different analytical methods and are compared to levels of trapping measured during drainage-imbibition cycles in the experiments. Metrics calculated from pore networks (i.e., pore body-throat aspect ratio and coordination number) and topological analysis (Euler characteristic) do not correlate well with trapping in these samples. In contrast, a new metric derived from the persistent homology analysis, which incorporates counts of topological features as well as their length scale and spatial distribution, correlates very well (R2 = 0.97) to trapping for all systems. This correlation encompasses a wide range of porous media and initial fluid configurations, and also applies to data sets of different imaging and image processing protocols.
  7. Fast and Accurate Tumor Segmentation of Histology Images Using Persistent Homology and Deep Convolutional Features (2019)

    Talha Qaiser, Yee-Wah Tsang, Daiki Taniyama, Naoya Sakamoto, Kazuaki Nakane, David Epstein, Nasir Rajpoot
    Abstract Tumor segmentation in whole-slide images of histology slides is an important step towards computer-assisted diagnosis. In this work, we propose a tumor segmentation framework based on the novel concept of persistent homology profiles (PHPs). For a given image patch, the homology profiles are derived by efficient computation of persistent homology, which is an algebraic tool from homology theory. We propose an efficient way of computing topological persistence of an image, alternative to simplicial homology. The PHPs are devised to distinguish tumor regions from their normal counterparts by modeling the atypical characteristics of tumor nuclei. We propose two variants of our method for tumor segmentation: one that targets speed without compromising accuracy and the other that targets higher accuracy. The fast version is based on a selection of exemplar image patches from a convolution neural network (CNN) and patch classification by quantifying the divergence between the PHPs of exemplars and the input image patch. Detailed comparative evaluation shows that the proposed algorithm is significantly faster than competing algorithms while achieving comparable results. The accurate version combines the PHPs and high-level CNN features and employs a multi-stage ensemble strategy for image patch labeling. Experimental results demonstrate that the combination of PHPs and CNN features outperform competing algorithms. This study is performed on two independently collected colorectal datasets containing adenoma, adenocarcinoma, signet, and healthy cases. Collectively, the accurate tumor segmentation produces the highest average patch-level F1-score, as compared with competing algorithms, on malignant and healthy cases from both the datasets. Overall the proposed framework highlights the utility of persistent homology for histopathology image analysis.
  8. Topological Eulerian Synthesis of Slow Motion Periodic Videos (2018)

    Christopher Tralie, Matthew Berger
    Abstract We consider the problem of taking a video that is comprised of multiple periods of repetitive motion, and reordering the frames of the video into a single period, producing a detailed, single cycle video of motion. This problem is challenging, as such videos often contain noise, drift due to camera motion and from cycle to cycle, and irrelevant background motion/occlusions, and these factors can confound the relevant periodic motion we seek in the video. To address these issues in a simple and efficient manner, we introduce a tracking free Eulerian approach for synthesizing a single cycle of motion. Our approach is geometric: we treat each frame as a point in high-dimensional Euclidean space, and analyze the sliding window embedding formed by this sequence of points, which yields samples along a topological loop regardless of the type of periodic motion. We combine tools from topological data analysis and spectral geometric analysis to estimate the phase of each window, and we exploit the sliding window structure to robustly reorder frames. We show quantitative results that highlight the robustness of our technique to camera shake, noise, and occlusions, and qualitative results of single-cycle motion synthesis across a variety of scenarios.
  9. RGB Image-Based Data Analysis via Discrete Morse Theory and Persistent Homology (2018)

    Chuan Du, Christopher Szul, Adarsh Manawa, Nima Rasekh, Rosemary Guzman, Ruth Davidson
    Abstract Understanding and comparing images for the purposes of data analysis is currently a very computationally demanding task. A group at Australian National University (ANU) recently developed open-source code that can detect fundamental topological features of a grayscale image in a computationally feasible manner. This is made possible by the fact that computers store grayscale images as cubical cellular complexes. These complexes can be studied using the techniques of discrete Morse theory. We expand the functionality of the ANU code by introducing methods and software for analyzing images encoded in red, green, and blue (RGB), because this image encoding is very popular for publicly available data. Our methods allow the extraction of key topological information from RGB images via informative persistence diagrams by introducing novel methods for transforming RGB-to-grayscale. This paradigm allows us to perform data analysis directly on RGB images representing water scarcity variability as well as crime variability. We introduce software enabling a a user to predict future image properties, towards the eventual aim of more rapid image-based data behavior prediction.
  10. Segmentation of Biomedical Images by a Computational Topology Framework (2017)

    Rodrigo Rojas Moraleda, Wei Xiong, Niels Halama, Katja Breitkopf-Heinlein, Steven Steven, Luis Salinas, Dieter W. Heermann, Nektarios A. Valous
    Abstract The segmentation of cell nuclei is an important step towards the automated analysis of histological images. The presence of a large number of nuclei in whole-slide images necessitates methods that are computationally tractable in addition to being effective. In this work, a method is developed for the robust segmentation of cell nuclei in histological images based on the principles of persistent homology. More specifically, an abstract simplicial homology approach for image segmentation is established. Essentially, the approach deals with the persistence of disconnected sets in the image, thus identifying salient regions that express patterns of persistence. By introducing an image representation based on topological features, the task of segmentation is less dependent on variations of color or texture. This results in a novel approach that generalizes well and provides stable performance. The method conceptualizes regions of interest (cell nuclei) pertinent to their topological features in a successful manner. The time cost of the proposed approach is lower-bounded by an almost linear behavior and upper-bounded by O(n2) in a worst-case scenario. Time complexity matches a quasilinear behavior which is O(n1+ɛ) for ε \textless 1. Images acquired from histological sections of liver tissue are used as a case study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. The histological landscape consists of hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells. The accuracy of the proposed methodology is verified against an automated workflow created by the output of a conventional filter bank (validated by experts) and the supervised training of a random forest classifier. The results are obtained on a per-object basis. The proposed workflow successfully detected both hepatocyte and non-parenchymal cell nuclei with an accuracy of 84.6%, and hepatocyte cell nuclei only with an accuracy of 86.2%. A public histological dataset with supplied ground-truth data is also used for evaluating the performance of the proposed approach (accuracy: 94.5%). Further validations are carried out with a publicly available dataset and ground-truth data from the Gland Segmentation in Colon Histology Images Challenge (GlaS) contest. The proposed method is useful for obtaining unsupervised robust initial segmentations that can be further integrated in image/data processing and management pipelines. The development of a fully automated system supporting a human expert provides tangible benefits in the context of clinical decision-making.
  11. Persistence-Based Pooling for Shape Pose Recognition (2016)

    Thomas Bonis, Maks Ovsjanikov, Steve Oudot, Frédéric Chazal
    Abstract In this paper, we propose a novel pooling approach for shape classification and recognition using the bag-of-words pipeline, based on topological persistence, a recent tool from Topological Data Analysis. Our technique extends the standard max-pooling, which summarizes the distribution of a visual feature with a single number, thereby losing any notion of spatiality. Instead, we propose to use topological persistence, and the derived persistence diagrams, to provide significantly more informative and spatially sensitive characterizations of the feature functions, which can lead to better recognition performance. Unfortunately, despite their conceptual appeal, persistence diagrams are difficult to handle, since they are not naturally represented as vectors in Euclidean space and even the standard metric, the bottleneck distance is not easy to compute. Furthermore, classical distances between diagrams, such as the bottleneck and Wasserstein distances, do not allow to build positive definite kernels that can be used for learning. To handle this issue, we provide a novel way to transform persistence diagrams into vectors, in which comparisons are trivial. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of our construction on the Non-Rigid 3D Human Models SHREC 2014 dataset, where we show that topological pooling can provide significant improvements over the standard pooling methods for the shape pose recognition within the bag-of-words pipeline.
  12. Skeletonization and Partitioning of Digital Images Using Discrete Morse Theory (2015)

    Olaf Delgado-Friedrichs, Vanessa Robins, Adrian Sheppard
    Abstract We show how discrete Morse theory provides a rigorous and unifying foundation for defining skeletons and partitions of grayscale digital images. We model a grayscale image as a cubical complex with a real-valued function defined on its vertices (the voxel values). This function is extended to a discrete gradient vector field using the algorithm presented in Robins, Wood, Sheppard TPAMI 33:1646 (2011). In the current paper we define basins (the building blocks of a partition) and segments of the skeleton using the stable and unstable sets associated with critical cells. The natural connection between Morse theory and homology allows us to prove the topological validity of these constructions; for example, that the skeleton is homotopic to the initial object. We simplify the basins and skeletons via Morse-theoretic cancellation of critical cells in the discrete gradient vector field using a strategy informed by persistent homology. Simple working Python code for our algorithms for efficient vector field traversal is included. Example data are taken from micro-CT images of porous materials, an application area where accurate topological models of pore connectivity are vital for fluid-flow modelling.
  13. A Klein-Bottle-Based Dictionary for Texture Representation (2014)

    Jose A. Perea, Gunnar Carlsson
    Abstract A natural object of study in texture representation and material classification is the probability density function, in pixel-value space, underlying the set of small patches from the given image. Inspired by the fact that small \$\$n\times n\$\$n×nhigh-contrast patches from natural images in gray-scale accumulate with high density around a surface \$\$\fancyscript\K\\subset \\mathbb \R\\\textasciicircum\n\textasciicircum2\\$\$K⊂Rn2with the topology of a Klein bottle (Carlsson et al. International Journal of Computer Vision 76(1):1–12, 2008), we present in this paper a novel framework for the estimation and representation of distributions around \$\$\fancyscript\K\\$\$K, of patches from texture images. More specifically, we show that most \$\$n\times n\$\$n×npatches from a given image can be projected onto \$\$\fancyscript\K\\$\$Kyielding a finite sample \$\$S\subset \fancyscript\K\\$\$S⊂K, whose underlying probability density function can be represented in terms of Fourier-like coefficients, which in turn, can be estimated from \$\$S\$\$S. We show that image rotation acts as a linear transformation at the level of the estimated coefficients, and use this to define a multi-scale rotation-invariant descriptor. We test it by classifying the materials in three popular data sets: The CUReT, UIUCTex and KTH-TIPS texture databases.
  14. Multiphase Mixing Quantification by Computational Homology and Imaging Analysis (2011)

    Jianxin Xu, Hua Wang, Hui Fang
    Abstract The purpose of this study is to introduce a new technique for quantifying the efficiency of multiphase mixing. This technique based on algebraic topology is illustrated by using the hydraulic modeling of gas agitated reactors stirred by top lance gas injection and image analysis. The zeroth Betti numbers are used to estimate the numbers of pieces in the patterns, leading to a useful parameter to characterize the mixture homogeneity. The first Betti numbers are introduced to characterize the nonhomogeneity of the mixture. The mixing efficiency can be characterized by the Betti numbers for binary images of the patterns. This novel method may be applied for studying a variety of multiphase mixing problems in which multiphase components or tracers are visually distinguishable.
  15. Computing Robustness and Persistence for Images (2010)

    P. Bendich, H. Edelsbrunner, M. Kerber
    Abstract We are interested in 3-dimensional images given as arrays of voxels with intensity values. Extending these values to a continuous function, we study the robustness of homology classes in its level and interlevel sets, that is, the amount of perturbation needed to destroy these classes. The structure of the homology classes and their robustness, over all level and interlevel sets, can be visualized by a triangular diagram of dots obtained by computing the extended persistence of the function. We give a fast hierarchical algorithm using the dual complexes of oct-tree approximations of the function. In addition, we show that for balanced oct-trees, the dual complexes are geometrically realized in R3 and can thus be used to construct level and interlevel sets. We apply these tools to study 3-dimensional images of plant root systems.
  16. On the Local Behavior of Spaces of Natural Images (2008)

    Gunnar Carlsson, Tigran Ishkhanov, Vin de Silva, Afra Zomorodian
    Abstract In this study we concentrate on qualitative topological analysis of the local behavior of the space of natural images. To this end, we use a space of 3 by 3 high-contrast patches ℳ. We develop a theoretical model for the high-density 2-dimensional submanifold of ℳ showing that it has the topology of the Klein bottle. Using our topological software package PLEX we experimentally verify our theoretical conclusions. We use polynomial representation to give coordinatization to various subspaces of ℳ. We find the best-fitting embedding of the Klein bottle into the ambient space of ℳ. Our results are currently being used in developing a compression algorithm based on a Klein bottle dictionary.
  17. Finite Topology as Applied to Image Analysis (1989)

    V. A Kovalevsky
    Abstract The notion of a cellular complex which is well known in the topology is applied to describe the structure of images. It is shown that the topology of cellular complexes is the only possible topology of finite sets. Under this topology no contradictions or paradoxes arise when defining connected subsets and their boundaries. Ways of encoding images as cellular complexes are discussed. The process of image segmentation is considered as splitting (in the topological sense) a cellular complex into blocks of cells. The notion of a cell list is introduced as a precise and compact data structure for encoding segmented images. Some applications of this data structure to the image analysis are demonstrated.