🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001678s)
  1. Generalized Penalty for Circular Coordinate Representation (2020)

    Hengrui Luo, Alice Patania, Jisu Kim, Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson
    Abstract Topological Data Analysis (TDA) provides novel approaches that allow us to analyze the geometrical shapes and topological structures of a dataset. As one important application, TDA can be used for data visualization and dimension reduction. We follow the framework of circular coordinate representation, which allows us to perform dimension reduction and visualization for high-dimensional datasets on a torus using persistent cohomology. In this paper, we propose a method to adapt the circular coordinate framework to take into account sparsity in high-dimensional applications. We use a generalized penalty function instead of an \$L_\2\\$ penalty in the traditional circular coordinate algorithm. We provide simulation experiments and real data analysis to support our claim that circular coordinates with generalized penalty will accommodate the sparsity in high-dimensional datasets under different sampling schemes while preserving the topological structures.
  2. Multivariate Data Analysis Using Persistence-Based Filtering and Topological Signatures (2012)

    B. Rieck, H. Mara, H. Leitte
    Abstract The extraction of significant structures in arbitrary high-dimensional data sets is a challenging task. Moreover, classifying data points as noise in order to reduce a data set bears special relevance for many application domains. Standard methods such as clustering serve to reduce problem complexity by providing the user with classes of similar entities. However, they usually do not highlight relations between different entities and require a stopping criterion, e.g. the number of clusters to be detected. In this paper, we present a visualization pipeline based on recent advancements in algebraic topology. More precisely, we employ methods from persistent homology that enable topological data analysis on high-dimensional data sets. Our pipeline inherently copes with noisy data and data sets of arbitrary dimensions. It extracts central structures of a data set in a hierarchical manner by using a persistence-based filtering algorithm that is theoretically well-founded. We furthermore introduce persistence rings, a novel visualization technique for a class of topological features-the persistence intervals-of large data sets. Persistence rings provide a unique topological signature of a data set, which helps in recognizing similarities. In addition, we provide interactive visualization techniques that assist the user in evaluating the parameter space of our method in order to extract relevant structures. We describe and evaluate our analysis pipeline by means of two very distinct classes of data sets: First, a class of synthetic data sets containing topological objects is employed to highlight the interaction capabilities of our method. Second, in order to affirm the utility of our technique, we analyse a class of high-dimensional real-world data sets arising from current research in cultural heritage.
  3. Branching and Circular Features in High Dimensional Data (2011)

    B. Wang, B. Summa, V. Pascucci, M. Vejdemo-Johansson
    Abstract Large observations and simulations in scientific research give rise to high-dimensional data sets that present many challenges and opportunities in data analysis and visualization. Researchers in application domains such as engineering, computational biology, climate study, imaging and motion capture are faced with the problem of how to discover compact representations of highdimensional data while preserving their intrinsic structure. In many applications, the original data is projected onto low-dimensional space via dimensionality reduction techniques prior to modeling. One problem with this approach is that the projection step in the process can fail to preserve structure in the data that is only apparent in high dimensions. Conversely, such techniques may create structural illusions in the projection, implying structure not present in the original high-dimensional data. Our solution is to utilize topological techniques to recover important structures in high-dimensional data that contains non-trivial topology. Specifically, we are interested in high-dimensional branching structures. We construct local circle-valued coordinate functions to represent such features. Subsequently, we perform dimensionality reduction on the data while ensuring such structures are visually preserved. Additionally, we study the effects of global circular structures on visualizations. Our results reveal never-before-seen structures on real-world data sets from a variety of applications.