🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001047s)
  1. Topological Gene Expression Networks Recapitulate Brain Anatomy and Function (2019)

    Alice Patania, Pierluigi Selvaggi, Mattia Veronese, Ottavia Dipasquale, Paul Expert, Giovanni Petri
    Abstract Understanding how gene expression translates to and affects human behavior is one of the ultimate goals of neuroscience. In this paper, we present a pipeline based on Mapper, a topological simplification tool, to analyze gene co-expression data. We first validate the method by reproducing key results from the literature on the Allen Human Brain Atlas and the correlations between resting-state fMRI and gene co-expression maps. We then analyze a dopamine-related gene set and find that co-expression networks produced by Mapper return a structure that matches the well-known anatomy of the dopaminergic pathway. Our results suggest that network based descriptions can be a powerful tool to explore the relationships between genetic pathways and their association with brain function and its perturbation due to illness and/or pharmacological challenges., In this paper, we described a gene co-expression analysis pipeline that produces networks that we show to be closely related to either brain function and to neurotransmitter pathways. Our results suggest that this pipeline could be developed into a platform enabling the exploration of the effects of physiological and pathological alterations to specific gene sets, including profiling drugs effects.
  2. Gene Coexpression Network Comparison via Persistent Homology (2018)

    Ali Nabi Duman, Harun Pirim
    Abstract Persistent homology, a topological data analysis (TDA) method, is applied to microarray data sets. Although there are a few papers referring to TDA methods in microarray analysis, the usage of persistent homology in the comparison of several weighted gene coexpression networks (WGCN) was not employed before to the very best of our knowledge. We calculate the persistent homology of weighted networks constructed from 38 Arabidopsis microarray data sets to test the relevance and the success of this approach in distinguishing the stress factors. We quantify multiscale topological features of each network using persistent homology and apply a hierarchical clustering algorithm to the distance matrix whose entries are pairwise bottleneck distance between the networks. The immunoresponses to different stress factors are distinguishable by our method. The networks of similar immunoresponses are found to be close with respect to bottleneck distance indicating the similar topological features of WGCNs. This computationally efficient technique analyzing networks provides a quick test for advanced studies.