🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 10 matches in 0.001947s)
  1. Protein-Folding Analysis Using Features Obtained by Persistent Homology (2020)

    Takashi Ichinomiya, Ippei Obayashi, Yasuaki Hiraoka
    Abstract Understanding the protein-folding process is an outstanding issue in biophysics; recent developments in molecular dynamics simulation have provided insights into this phenomenon. However, the large freedom of atomic motion hinders the understanding of this process. In this study, we applied persistent homology, an emerging method to analyze topological features in a data set, to reveal protein-folding dynamics. We developed a new, to our knowledge, method to characterize the protein structure based on persistent homology and applied this method to molecular dynamics simulations of chignolin. Using principle component analysis or nonnegative matrix factorization, our analysis method revealed two stable states and one saddle state, corresponding to the native, misfolded, and transition states, respectively. We also identified an unfolded state with slow dynamics in the reduced space. Our method serves as a promising tool to understand the protein-folding process.
  2. HERMES: Persistent Spectral Graph Software (2020)

    Rui Wang, Rundong Zhao, Emily Ribando-Gros, Jiahui Chen, Yiying Tong, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Persistent homology (PH) is one of the most popular tools in topological data analysis (TDA), while graph theory has had a significant impact on data science. Our earlier work introduced the persistent spectral graph (PSG) theory as a unified multiscale paradigm to encompass TDA and geometric analysis. In PSG theory, families of persistent Laplacians (PLs) corresponding to various topological dimensions are constructed via a filtration to sample a given dataset at multiple scales. The harmonic spectra from the null spaces of PLs offer the same topological invariants, namely persistent Betti numbers, at various dimensions as those provided by PH, while the non-harmonic spectra of PLs give rise to additional geometric analysis of the shape of the data. In this work, we develop an open-source software package, called highly efficient robust multidimensional evolutionary spectra (HERMES), to enable broad applications of PSGs in science, engineering, and technology. To ensure the reliability and robustness of HERMES, we have validated the software with simple geometric shapes and complex datasets from three-dimensional (3D) protein structures. We found that the smallest non-zero eigenvalues are very sensitive to data abnormality.
  3. Evolutionary Homology on Coupled Dynamical Systems With Applications to Protein Flexibility Analysis (2020)

    Zixuan Cang, Elizabeth Munch, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract While the spatial topological persistence is naturally constructed from a radius-based filtration, it has hardly been derived from a temporal filtration. Most topological models are designed for the global topology of a given object as a whole. There is no method reported in the literature for the topology of an individual component in an object to the best of our knowledge. For many problems in science and engineering, the topology of an individual component is important for describing its properties. We propose evolutionary homology (EH) constructed via a time evolution-based filtration and topological persistence. Our approach couples a set of dynamical systems or chaotic oscillators by the interactions of a physical system, such as a macromolecule. The interactions are approximated by weighted graph Laplacians. Simplices, simplicial complexes, algebraic groups and topological persistence are defined on the coupled trajectories of the chaotic oscillators. The resulting EH gives rise to time-dependent topological invariants or evolutionary barcodes for an individual component of the physical system, revealing its topology-function relationship. In conjunction with Wasserstein metrics, the proposed EH is applied to protein flexibility analysis, an important problem in computational biophysics. Numerical results for the B-factor prediction of a benchmark set of 364 proteins indicate that the proposed EH outperforms all the other state-of-the-art methods in the field.
  4. Weighted Persistent Homology for Osmolyte Molecular Aggregation and Hydrogen-Bonding Network Analysis (2020)

    D. Vijay Anand, Zhenyu Meng, Kelin Xia, Yuguang Mu
    Abstract It has long been observed that trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and urea demonstrate dramatically different properties in a protein folding process. Even with the enormous theoretical and experimental research work on these two osmolytes, various aspects of their underlying mechanisms still remain largely elusive. In this paper, we propose to use the weighted persistent homology to systematically study the osmolytes molecular aggregation and their hydrogen-bonding network from a local topological perspective. We consider two weighted models, i.e., localized persistent homology (LPH) and interactive persistent homology (IPH). Boltzmann persistent entropy (BPE) is proposed to quantitatively characterize the topological features from LPH and IPH, together with persistent Betti number (PBN). More specifically, from the localized persistent homology models, we have found that TMAO and urea have very different local topology. TMAO is found to exhibit a local network structure. With the concentration increase, the circle elements in these networks show a clear increase in their total numbers and a decrease in their relative sizes. In contrast, urea shows two types of local topological patterns, i.e., local clusters around 6 Å and a few global circle elements at around 12 Å. From the interactive persistent homology models, it has been found that our persistent radial distribution function (PRDF) from the global-scale IPH has same physical properties as the traditional radial distribution function. Moreover, PRDFs from the local-scale IPH can also be generated and used to characterize the local interaction information. Other than the clear difference of the first peak value of PRDFs at filtration size 4 Å, TMAO and urea also shows very different behaviors at the second peak region from filtration size 5 Å to 10 Å. These differences are also reflected in the PBNs and BPEs of the local-scale IPH. These localized topological information has never been revealed before. Since graphs can be transferred into simplicial complexes by the clique complex, our weighted persistent homology models can be used in the analysis of various networks and graphs from any molecular structures and aggregation systems.
  5. Hyperparameter Optimization of Topological Features for Machine Learning Applications (2019)

    Francis Motta, Christopher Tralie, Rossella Bedini, Fabiano Bini, Gilberto Bini, Hamed Eramian, Marcio Gameiro, Steve Haase, Hugh Haddox, John Harer, Nick Leiby, Franco Marinozzi, Scott Novotney, Gabe Rocklin, Jed Singer, Devin Strickland, Matt Vaughn
    Abstract This paper describes a general pipeline for generating optimal vector representations of topological features of data for use with machine learning algorithms. This pipeline can be viewed as a costly black-box function defined over a complex configuration space, each point of which specifies both how features are generated and how predictive models are trained on those features. We propose using state-of-the-art Bayesian optimization algorithms to inform the choice of topological vectorization hyperparameters while simultaneously choosing learning model parameters. We demonstrate the need for and effectiveness of this pipeline using two difficult biological learning problems, and illustrate the nontrivial interactions between topological feature generation and learning model hyperparameters.
  6. Multidimensional Persistence in Biomolecular Data (2015)

    Kelin Xia, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants.
  7. Persistent Homology Analysis of Protein Structure, Flexibility, and Folding (2014)

    Kelin Xia, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract SUMMARYProteins are the most important biomolecules for living organisms. The understanding of protein structure, function, dynamics, and transport is one of the most challenging tasks in biological science. In the present work, persistent homology is, for the first time, introduced for extracting molecular topological fingerprints (MTFs) based on the persistence of molecular topological invariants. MTFs are utilized for protein characterization, identification, and classification. The method of slicing is proposed to track the geometric origin of protein topological invariants. Both all-atom and coarse-grained representations of MTFs are constructed. A new cutoff-like filtration is proposed to shed light on the optimal cutoff distance in elastic network models. On the basis of the correlation between protein compactness, rigidity, and connectivity, we propose an accumulated bar length generated from persistent topological invariants for the quantitative modeling of protein flexibility. To this end, a correlation matrix-based filtration is developed. This approach gives rise to an accurate prediction of the optimal characteristic distance used in protein B-factor analysis. Finally, MTFs are employed to characterize protein topological evolution during protein folding and quantitatively predict the protein folding stability. An excellent consistence between our persistent homology prediction and molecular dynamics simulation is found. This work reveals the topology–function relationship of proteins. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  8. Structural Insight Into RNA Hairpin Folding Intermediates (2008)

    Gregory R. Bowman, Xuhui Huang, Yuan Yao, Jian Sun, Gunnar Carlsson, Leonidas J. Guibas, Vijay S. Pande
    Abstract , Hairpins are a ubiquitous secondary structure motif in RNA molecules. Despite their simple structure, there is some debate over whether they fold in a two-state or multi-state manner. We have studied the folding of a small tetraloop hairpin using a serial version of replica exchange molecular dynamics on a distributed computing environment. On the basis of these simulations, we have identified a number of intermediates that are consistent with experimental results. We also find that folding is not simply the reverse of high-temperature unfolding and suggest that this may be a general feature of biomolecular folding.