🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.000982s)
  1. Topological Data Analysis for Electric Motor Eccentricity Fault Detection (2022)

    Bingnan Wang, Chungwei Lin, Hiroshi Inoue, Makoto Kanemaru
    Abstract In this paper, we develop topological data analysis (TDA) method for motor current signature analysis (MCSA), and apply it to induction motor eccentricity fault detection. We introduce TDA and present the procedure of extracting topological features from time-domain data that will be represented using persistence diagrams and vectorized Betti sequences. The procedure is applied to induction machine phase current signal analysis, and shown to be highly effective in differentiating signals from different eccentricity levels. With TDA, we are able to use a simple regression model that can predict the fault levels with reasonable accuracy, even for the data of eccentricity levels that are not seen in the training data. The proposed method is model-free, and only requires a small segment of time-domain data to make prediction. These advantages make it attractive for a wide range of fault detection applications.
  2. Identification of Key Features Using Topological Data Analysis for Accurate Prediction of Manufacturing System Outputs (2017)

    Wei Guo, Ashis G. Banerjee
    Abstract Topological data analysis (TDA) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches to extract insights from high-dimensional data of varying types such as images, point clouds, and meshes, in an unsupervised manner. To the best of our knowledge, here, we provide the first successful application of TDA in the manufacturing systems domain. We apply a widely used TDA method, known as the Mapper algorithm, on two benchmark data sets for chemical process yield prediction and semiconductor wafer fault detection, respectively. The algorithm yields topological networks that capture the intrinsic clusters and connections among the clusters present in the data sets, which are difficult to detect using traditional methods. We select key process variables or features that impact the system outcomes by analyzing the network shapes. We then use predictive models to evaluate the impact of the selected features. Results show that the models achieve at least the same level of high prediction accuracy as with all the process variables, thereby, providing a way to carry out process monitoring and control in a more cost-effective manner.