🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.000963s)
  1. A Topological Machine Learning Pipeline for Classification (2022)

    Francesco Conti, Davide Moroni, Maria Antonietta Pascali
    Abstract In this work, we develop a pipeline that associates Persistence Diagrams to digital data via the most appropriate filtration for the type of data considered. Using a grid search approach, this pipeline determines optimal representation methods and parameters. The development of such a topological pipeline for Machine Learning involves two crucial steps that strongly affect its performance: firstly, digital data must be represented as an algebraic object with a proper associated filtration in order to compute its topological summary, the Persistence Diagram. Secondly, the persistence diagram must be transformed with suitable representation methods in order to be introduced in a Machine Learning algorithm. We assess the performance of our pipeline, and in parallel, we compare the different representation methods on popular benchmark datasets. This work is a first step toward both an easy and ready-to-use pipeline for data classification using persistent homology and Machine Learning, and to understand the theoretical reasons why, given a dataset and a task to be performed, a pair (filtration, topological representation) is better than another.
  2. Using Zigzag Persistent Homology to Detect Hopf Bifurcations in Dynamical Systems (2020)

    Sarah Tymochko, Elizabeth Munch, Firas A. Khasawneh
    Abstract Bifurcations in dynamical systems characterize qualitative changes in the system behavior. Therefore, their detection is important because they can signal the transition from normal system operation to imminent failure. While standard persistent homology has been used in this setting, it usually requires analyzing a collection of persistence diagrams, which in turn drives up the computational cost considerably. Using zigzag persistence, we can capture topological changes in the state space of the dynamical system in only one persistence diagram. Here we present Bifurcations using ZigZag (BuZZ), a one-step method to study and detect bifurcations using zigzag persistence. The BuZZ method is successfully able to detect this type of behavior in two synthetic examples as well as an example dynamical system.
  3. Stable Signatures for Dynamic Graphs and Dynamic Metric Spaces via Zigzag Persistence (2018)

    Woojin Kim, Facundo Memoli
    Abstract When studying flocking/swarming behaviors in animals one is interested in quantifying and comparing the dynamics of the clustering induced by the coalescence and disbanding of animals in different groups. In a similar vein, studying the dynamics of social networks leads to the problem of characterizing groups/communities as they form and disperse throughout time. Motivated by this, we study the problem of obtaining persistent homology based summaries of time-dependent data. Given a finite dynamic graph (DG), we first construct a zigzag persistence module arising from linearizing the dynamic transitive graph naturally induced from the input DG. Based on standard results, we then obtain a persistence diagram or barcode from this zigzag persistence module. We prove that these barcodes are stable under perturbations in the input DG under a suitable distance between DGs that we identify. More precisely, our stability theorem can be interpreted as providing a lower bound for the distance between DGs. Since it relies on barcodes, and their bottleneck distance, this lower bound can be computed in polynomial time from the DG inputs. Since DGs can be given rise by applying the Rips functor (with a fixed threshold) to dynamic metric spaces, we are also able to derive related stable invariants for these richer class of dynamic objects. Along the way, we propose a summarization of dynamic graphs that captures their time-dependent clustering features which we call formigrams. These set-valued functions generalize the notion of dendrogram, a prevalent tool for hierarchical clustering. In order to elucidate the relationship between our distance between two DGs and the bottleneck distance between their associated barcodes, we exploit recent advances in the stability of zigzag persistence due to Botnan and Lesnick, and to Bjerkevik.