🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 6 matches in 0.001227s)
  1. Topological Data Analysis of Single-Cell Hi-C Contact Maps (2020)

    Mathieu Carrière, Raúl Rabadán
    Abstract Due to recent breakthroughs in high-throughput sequencing, it is now possible to use chromosome conformation capture (CCC) to understand the three dimensional conformation of DNA at the whole genome level, and to characterize it with the so-called contact maps. This is very useful since many biological processes are correlated with DNA folding, such as DNA transcription. However, the methods for the analysis of such conformations are still lacking mathematical guarantees and statistical power. To handle this issue, we propose to use the Mapper, which is a standard tool of Topological Data Analysis (TDA) that allows one to efficiently encode the inherent continuity and topology of underlying biological processes in data, in the form of a graph with various features such as branches and loops. In this article, we show how recent statistical techniques developed in TDA for the Mapper algorithm can be extended and leveraged to formally define and statistically quantify the presence of topological structures coming from biological phenomena, such as the cell cyle, in datasets of CCC contact maps.
  2. Identification of Relevant Genetic Alterations in Cancer Using Topological Data Analysis (2020)

    Raúl Rabadán, Yamina Mohamedi, Udi Rubin, Tim Chu, Adam N. Alghalith, Oliver Elliott, Luis Arnés, Santiago Cal, Álvaro J. Obaya, Arnold J. Levine, Pablo G. Cámara
    Abstract Large-scale cancer genomic studies enable the systematic identification of mutations that lead to the genesis and progression of tumors, uncovering the underlying molecular mechanisms and potential therapies. While some such mutations are recurrently found in many tumors, many others exist solely within a few samples, precluding detection by conventional recurrence-based statistical approaches. Integrated analysis of somatic mutations and RNA expression data across 12 tumor types reveals that mutations of cancer genes are usually accompanied by substantial changes in expression. We use topological data analysis to leverage this observation and uncover 38 elusive candidate cancer-associated genes, including inactivating mutations of the metalloproteinase ADAMTS12 in lung adenocarcinoma. We show that ADAMTS12−/− mice have a five-fold increase in the susceptibility to develop lung tumors, confirming the role of ADAMTS12 as a tumor suppressor gene. Our results demonstrate that data integration through topological techniques can increase our ability to identify previously unreported cancer-related alterations., Rare cancer mutations are often missed using recurrence-based statistical approaches, but are usually accompanied by changes in expression. Here the authors leverage this information to uncover several elusive candidate cancer-associated genes using topological data analysis.
  3. Using Persistent Homology as a New Approach for Super-Resolution Localization Microscopy Data Analysis and Classification of γH2AX Foci/Clusters (2018)

    Andreas Hofmann, Matthias Krufczik, Dieter W. Heermann, Michael Hausmann
    Abstract DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are the most severe damages in chromatin induced by ionizing radiation. In response to such environmentally determined stress situations, cells have developed repair mechanisms. Although many investigations have contributed to a detailed understanding of repair processes, e.g., homologous recombination repair or non-homologous end-joining, the question is not sufficiently answered, how a cell decides to apply a certain repair process at a certain damage site, since all different repair pathways could simultaneously occur in the same cell nucleus. One of the first processes after DSB induction is phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX to γH2AX in the given surroundings of the damaged locus. Since the spatial organization of chromatin is not random, it may be conclusive that the spatial organization of γH2AX foci is also not random, and rather, contributes to accessibility of special repair proteins to the damaged site, and thus, to the following repair pathway at this given site. The aim of this article is to demonstrate a new approach to analyze repair foci by their topology in order to obtain a cell independent method of categorization. During the last decade, novel super-resolution fluorescence light microscopic techniques have enabled new insights into genome structure and spatial organization on the nano-scale in the order of 10 nm. One of these techniques is single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with which the spatial coordinates of single fluorescence molecules can precisely be determined and density and distance distributions can be calculated. This method is an appropriate tool to quantify complex changes of chromatin and to describe repair foci on the single molecule level. Based on the pointillist information obtained by SMLM from specifically labeled heterochromatin and γH2AX foci reflecting the chromatin morphology and repair foci topology, we have developed a new analytical methodology of foci or foci cluster characterization, respectively, by means of persistence homology. This method allows, for the first time, a cell independent comparison of two point distributions (here the point distributions of two γH2AX clusters) with each other of a selected ensample and to give a mathematical measure of their similarity. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, cells were irradiated by low LET (linear energy transfer) radiation with different doses and the heterochromatin and γH2AX foci were fluorescently labeled by antibodies for SMLM. By means of our new analysis method, we were able to show that the topology of clusters of γH2AX foci can be categorized depending on the distance to heterochromatin. This method opens up new possibilities to categorize spatial organization of point patterns by parameterization of topological similarity.
  4. WDR76 Co-Localizes With Heterochromatin Related Proteins and Rapidly Responds to DNA Damage (2016)

    Joshua M. Gilmore, Mihaela E. Sardiu, Brad D. Groppe, Janet L. Thornton, Xingyu Liu, Gerald Dayebgadoh, Charles A. Banks, Brian D. Slaughter, Jay R. Unruh, Jerry L. Workman, Laurence Florens, Michael P. Washburn
    Abstract Proteins that respond to DNA damage play critical roles in normal and diseased states in human biology. Studies have suggested that the S. cerevisiae protein CMR1/YDL156w is associated with histones and is possibly associated with DNA repair and replication processes. Through a quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity purifications here we show that the human homologue of this protein, WDR76, shares multiple protein associations with the histones H2A, H2B, and H4. Furthermore, our quantitative proteomic analysis of WDR76 associated proteins demonstrated links to proteins in the DNA damage response like PARP1 and XRCC5 and heterochromatin related proteins like CBX1, CBX3, and CBX5. Co-immunoprecipitation studies validated these interactions. Next, quantitative imaging studies demonstrated that WDR76 was recruited to laser induced DNA damage immediately after induction, and we compared the recruitment of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage to known DNA damage proteins like PARP1, XRCC5, and RPA1. In addition, WDR76 co-localizes to puncta with the heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX5, which are also recruited to DNA damage but much less intensely than WDR76. This work demonstrates the chromatin and DNA damage protein associations of WDR76 and demonstrates the rapid response of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage.
  5. Current Theoretical Models Fail to Predict the Topological Complexity of the Human Genome (2015)

    Javier Arsuaga, Reyka G. Jayasinghe, Robert G. Scharein, Mark R. Segal, Robert H. Stolz, Mariel Vazquez
    Abstract Understanding the folding of the human genome is a key challenge of modern structural biology. The emergence of chromatin conformation capture assays (e.g., Hi-C) has revolutionized chromosome biology and provided new insights into the three dimensional structure of the genome. The experimental data are highly complex and need to be analyzed with quantitative tools. It has been argued that the data obtained from Hi-C assays are consistent with a fractal organization of the genome. A key characteristic of the fractal globule is the lack of topological complexity (knotting or inter-linking). However, the absence of topological complexity contradicts results from polymer physics showing that the entanglement of long linear polymers in a confined volume increases rapidly with the length and with decreasing volume. In vivo and in vitro assays support this claim in some biological systems. We simulate knotted lattice polygons confined inside a sphere and demonstrate that their contact frequencies agree with the human Hi-C data. We conclude that the topological complexity of the human genome cannot be inferred from current Hi-C data.
  6. Identification of Copy Number Aberrations in Breast Cancer Subtypes Using Persistence Topology (2015)

    Javier Arsuaga, Tyler Borrman, Raymond Cavalcante, Georgina Gonzalez, Catherine Park
    Abstract DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are of biological and medical interest because they help identify regulatory mechanisms underlying tumor initiation and evolution. Identification of tumor-driving CNAs (driver CNAs) however remains a challenging task, because they are frequently hidden by CNAs that are the product of random events that take place during tumor evolution. Experimental detection of CNAs is commonly accomplished through array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) assays followed by supervised and/or unsupervised statistical methods that combine the segmented profiles of all patients to identify driver CNAs. Here, we extend a previously-presented supervised algorithm for the identification of CNAs that is based on a topological representation of the data. Our method associates a two-dimensional (2D) point cloud with each aCGH profile and generates a sequence of simplicial complexes, mathematical objects that generalize the concept of a graph. This representation of the data permits segmenting the data at different resolutions and identifying CNAs by interrogating the topological properties of these simplicial complexes. We tested our approach on a published dataset with the goal of identifying specific breast cancer CNAs associated with specific molecular subtypes. Identification of CNAs associated with each subtype was performed by analyzing each subtype separately from the others and by taking the rest of the subtypes as the control. Our results found a new amplification in 11q at the location of the progesterone receptor in the Luminal A subtype. Aberrations in the Luminal B subtype were found only upon removal of the basal-like subtype from the control set. Under those conditions, all regions found in the original publication, except for 17q, were confirmed; all aberrations, except those in chromosome arms 8q and 12q were confirmed in the basal-like subtype. These two chromosome arms, however, were detected only upon removal of three patients with exceedingly large copy number values. More importantly, we detected 10 and 21 additional regions in the Luminal B and basal-like subtypes, respectively. Most of the additional regions were either validated on an independent dataset and/or using GISTIC. Furthermore, we found three new CNAs in the basal-like subtype: a combination of gains and losses in 1p, a gain in 2p and a loss in 14q. Based on these results, we suggest that topological approaches that incorporate multiresolution analyses and that interrogate topological properties of the data can help in the identification of copy number changes in cancer.