🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 4 matches in 0.001272s)
  1. A Multi-Parameter Persistence Framework for Mathematical Morphology (2021)

    Yu-Min Chung, Sarah Day, Chuan-Shen Hu
    Abstract The field of mathematical morphology offers well-studied techniques for image processing. In this work, we view morphological operations through the lens of persistent homology, a tool at the heart of the field of topological data analysis. We demonstrate that morphological operations naturally form a multiparameter filtration and that persistent homology can then be used to extract information about both topology and geometry in the images as well as to automate methods for optimizing the study and rendering of structure in images. For illustration, we apply this framework to analyze noisy binary, grayscale, and color images.
  2. Topological Regularization for Dense Prediction (2021)

    Deqing Fu, Bradley J. Nelson
    Abstract Dense prediction tasks such as depth perception and semantic segmentation are important applications in computer vision that have a concrete topological description in terms of partitioning an image into connected components or estimating a function with a small number of local extrema corresponding to objects in the image. We develop a form of topological regularization based on persistent homology that can be used in dense prediction tasks with these topological descriptions. Experimental results show that the output topology can also appear in the internal activations of trained neural networks which allows for a novel use of topological regularization to the internal states of neural networks during training, reducing the computational cost of the regularization. We demonstrate that this topological regularization of internal activations leads to improved convergence and test benchmarks on several problems and architectures.
  3. Localization in the Crowd With Topological Constraints (2020)

    Shahira Abousamra, Minh Hoai, Dimitris Samaras, Chao Chen
    Abstract We address the problem of crowd localization, i.e., the prediction of dots corresponding to people in a crowded scene. Due to various challenges, a localization method is prone to spatial semantic errors, i.e., predicting multiple dots within a same person or collapsing multiple dots in a cluttered region. We propose a topological approach targeting these semantic errors. We introduce a topological constraint that teaches the model to reason about the spatial arrangement of dots. To enforce this constraint, we define a persistence loss based on the theory of persistent homology. The loss compares the topographic landscape of the likelihood map and the topology of the ground truth. Topological reasoning improves the quality of the localization algorithm especially near cluttered regions. On multiple public benchmarks, our method outperforms previous localization methods. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential of our method in improving the performance in the crowd counting task.
  4. A Sheaf and Topology Approach to Generating Local Branch Numbers in Digital Images (2020)

    Chuan-Shen Hu, Yu-Min Chung
    Abstract This paper concerns a theoretical approach that combines topological data analysis (TDA) and sheaf theory. Topological data analysis, a rising field in mathematics and computer science, concerns the shape of the data and has been proven effective in many scientific disciplines. Sheaf theory, a mathematics subject in algebraic geometry, provides a framework for describing the local consistency in geometric objects. Persistent homology (PH) is one of the main driving forces in TDA, and the idea is to track changes of geometric objects at different scales. The persistence diagram (PD) summarizes the information of PH in the form of a multi-set. While PD provides useful information about the underlying objects, it lacks fine relations about the local consistency of specific pairs of generators in PD, such as the merging relation between two connected components in the PH. The sheaf structure provides a novel point of view for describing the merging relation of local objects in PH. It is the goal of this paper to establish a theoretic framework that utilizes the sheaf theory to uncover finer information from the PH. We also show that the proposed theory can be applied to identify the branch numbers of local objects in digital images.