🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 5 matches in 0.001864s)
  1. The Topology of Higher-Order Complexes Associated With Brain Hubs in Human Connectomes (2020)

    Miroslav Andjelković, Bosiljka Tadić, Roderick Melnik
    Abstract Higher-order connectivity in complex systems described by simplexes of different orders provides a geometry for simplex-based dynamical variables and interactions. Simplicial complexes that constitute a functional geometry of the human connectome can be crucial for the brain complex dynamics. In this context, the best-connected brain areas, designated as hub nodes, play a central role in supporting integrated brain function. Here, we study the structure of simplicial complexes attached to eight global hubs in the female and male connectomes and identify the core networks among the affected brain regions. These eight hubs (Putamen, Caudate, Hippocampus and Thalamus-Proper in the left and right cerebral hemisphere) are the highest-ranking according to their topological dimension, defined as the number of simplexes of all orders in which the node participates. Furthermore, we analyse the weight-dependent heterogeneity of simplexes. We demonstrate changes in the structure of identified core networks and topological entropy when the threshold weight is gradually increased. These results highlight the role of higher-order interactions in human brain networks and provide additional evidence for (dis)similarity between the female and male connectomes.
  2. Possible Clinical Use of Big Data: Personal Brain Connectomics (2018)

    Dong Soo Lee
    Abstract The biggest data is brain imaging data, which waited for clinical use during the last three decades. Topographic data interpretation prevailed for the first two decades, and only during the last decade, connectivity or connectomics data began to be analyzed properly. Owing to topological data interpretation and timely introduction of likelihood method based on hierarchical generalized linear model, we now foresee the clinical use of personal connectomics for classification and prediction of disease prognosis for brain diseases without any clue by currently available diagnostic methods.
  3. Persistent Brain Network Homology From the Perspective of Dendrogram (2012)

    Hyekyoung Lee, Hyejin Kang, Moo K. Chung, Bung-Nyun Kim, Dong Soo Lee
    Abstract The brain network is usually constructed by estimating the connectivity matrix and thresholding it at an arbitrary level. The problem with this standard method is that we do not have any generally accepted criteria for determining a proper threshold. Thus, we propose a novel multiscale framework that models all brain networks generated over every possible threshold. Our approach is based on persistent homology and its various representations such as the Rips filtration, barcodes, and dendrograms. This new persistent homological framework enables us to quantify various persistent topological features at different scales in a coherent manner. The barcode is used to quantify and visualize the evolutionary changes of topological features such as the Betti numbers over different scales. By incorporating additional geometric information to the barcode, we obtain a single linkage dendrogram that shows the overall evolution of the network. The difference between the two networks is then measured by the Gromov-Hausdorff distance over the dendrograms. As an illustration, we modeled and differentiated the FDG-PET based functional brain networks of 24 attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder children, 26 autism spectrum disorder children, and 11 pediatric control subjects.