🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 16 matches in 0.002603s)
  1. Induction Motor Eccentricity Fault Detection and Quantification Using Topological Data Analysis (2024)

    Bingnan Wang, Chungwei Lin, Hiroshi Inoue, Makoto Kanemaru
    Abstract In this paper, we propose a topological data analysis (TDA) method for the processing of induction motor stator current data, and apply it to the detection and quantification of eccentricity faults. Traditionally, physics-based models and involved signal processing techniques are required to identify and extract the subtle frequency components in current data related to a particular fault. We show that TDA offers an alternative way to extract fault related features, and effectively distinguish data from different fault conditions. We will introduce TDA method and the procedure of extracting topological features from time-domain data, and apply it to induction motor current data measured under different eccentricity fault conditions. We show that while the raw time-domain data are very challenging to distinguish, the extracted topological features from these data are distinct and highly associated with eccentricity fault level. With TDA processed data, we can effectively train machine learning models to predict fault levels with good accuracy, even for new data from eccentricity levels that are not seen in the training data. The proposed method is model-free, and only requires a small segment of time-domain data to make prediction. These advantages make it attractive for a wide range of data-driven fault detection applications.
  2. Motor Eccentricity Fault Detection: Physics-Based and Data-Driven Approaches (2023)

    Bingnan Wang, Hiroshi Inoue, Makoto Kanemaru
    Abstract Fault detection using motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is attractive for industrial applications due to its simplicity with no additional sensor installation required. However current components associated with faults are often very subtle and much smaller than the supply frequency component, making it challenging to detect and quantify fault levels. In this paper, we present our work on quantitative eccentricity fault diagnosis technologies for electric motors, including physical-model approach using improved winding function theory, which can simulate motor dynamics under faulty conditions and agrees well with experiment data, and data-driven approach using topological data analysis (TDA), which can effectively differentiate signals measured at different eccentricity levels. The advantages and limitations of each approach is discussed. Both methods can be extended to the detection and quantification of other types of electric motor faults.
  3. Topological Data Analysis for Electric Motor Eccentricity Fault Detection (2022)

    Bingnan Wang, Chungwei Lin, Hiroshi Inoue, Makoto Kanemaru
    Abstract In this paper, we develop topological data analysis (TDA) method for motor current signature analysis (MCSA), and apply it to induction motor eccentricity fault detection. We introduce TDA and present the procedure of extracting topological features from time-domain data that will be represented using persistence diagrams and vectorized Betti sequences. The procedure is applied to induction machine phase current signal analysis, and shown to be highly effective in differentiating signals from different eccentricity levels. With TDA, we are able to use a simple regression model that can predict the fault levels with reasonable accuracy, even for the data of eccentricity levels that are not seen in the training data. The proposed method is model-free, and only requires a small segment of time-domain data to make prediction. These advantages make it attractive for a wide range of fault detection applications.
  4. Severe Slugging Flow Identification From Topological Indicators (2022)

    Simone Casolo
    Abstract In this work, topological data analysis is used to identify the onset of severe slug flow in offshore petroleum production systems. Severe slugging is a multiphase flow regime known to be very inefficient and potentially harmful to process equipment and it is characterized by large oscillations in the production fluid pressure. Time series from pressure sensors in subsea oil wells are processed by means of Takens embedding to produce point clouds of data. Embedded sensor data is then analyzed using persistent homology to obtain topological indicators capable of revealing the occurrence of severe slugging in a condition-based monitoring approach. A large dataset of well events consisting of both real and simulated data is used to demonstrate the possibilty of authomatizing severe slugging detection from live data via topological data analysis. Methods based on persistence diagrams are shown to accurately identify severe slugging and to classify different flow regimes from pressure signals of producing wells with supervised machine learning.
  5. Filtration Curves for Graph Representation (2021)

    Leslie O'Bray, Bastian Rieck, Karsten Borgwardt
    Abstract The two predominant approaches to graph comparison in recent years are based on (i) enumerating matching subgraphs or (ii) comparing neighborhoods of nodes. In this work, we complement these two perspectives with a third way of representing graphs: using filtration curves from topological data analysis that capture both edge weight information and global graph structure. Filtration curves are highly efficient to compute and lead to expressive representations of graphs, which we demonstrate on graph classification benchmark datasets. Our work opens the door to a new form of graph representation in data mining.
  6. Topological Detection of Alzheimer’s Disease Using Betti Curves (2021)

    Ameer Saadat-Yazdi, Rayna Andreeva, Rik Sarkar
    Abstract Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating disease in the elderly, and is an increasing burden to the society due to an aging population. In this paper, we apply topological data analysis to structural MRI scans of the brain, and show that topological invariants make accurate predictors for Alzheimer’s. Using the construct of Betti Curves, we first show that topology is a good predictor of Age. Then we develop an approach to factor out the topological signature of age from Betti curves, and thus obtain accurate detection of Alzheimer’s disease. Experimental results show that topological features used with standard classifiers perform comparably to recently developed convolutional neural networks. These results imply that topology is a major aspect of structural changes due to aging and Alzheimer’s. We expect this relation will generate further insights for both early detection and better understanding of the disease.
  7. TDA-Net: Fusion of Persistent Homology and Deep Learning Features for COVID-19 Detection From Chest X-Ray Images (2021)

    Mustafa Hajij, Ghada Zamzmi, Fawwaz Batayneh
    Abstract Topological Data Analysis (TDA) has emerged recently as a robust tool to extract and compare the structure of datasets. TDA identifies features in data (e.g., connected components and holes) and assigns a quantitative measure to these features. Several studies reported that topological features extracted by TDA tools provide unique information about the data, discover new insights, and determine which feature is more related to the outcome. On the other hand, the overwhelming success of deep neural networks in learning patterns and relationships has been proven on various data applications including images. To capture the characteristics of both worlds, we propose TDA-Net, a novel ensemble network that fuses topological and deep features for the purpose of enhancing model generalizability and accuracy. We apply the proposed TDA-Net to a critical application, which is the automated detection of COVID-19 from CXR images. Experimental results showed that the proposed network achieved excellent performance and suggested the applicability of our method in practice.
  8. Topological Data Analysis Distinguishes Parameter Regimes in the Anderson-Chaplain Model of Angiogenesis (2021)

    John T. Nardini, Bernadette J. Stolz, Kevin B. Flores, Heather A. Harrington, Helen M. Byrne
    Abstract Angiogenesis is the process by which blood vessels form from pre-existing vessels. It plays a key role in many biological processes, including embryonic development and wound healing, and contributes to many diseases including cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The structure of the resulting vessel networks determines their ability to deliver nutrients and remove waste products from biological tissues. Here we simulate the Anderson-Chaplain model of angiogenesis at different parameter values and quantify the vessel architectures of the resulting synthetic data. Specifically, we propose a topological data analysis (TDA) pipeline for systematic analysis of the model. TDA is a vibrant and relatively new field of computational mathematics for studying the shape of data. We compute topological and standard descriptors of model simulations generated by different parameter values. We show that TDA of model simulation data stratifies parameter space into regions with similar vessel morphology. The methodologies proposed here are widely applicable to other synthetic and experimental data including wound healing, development, and plant biology.
  9. Persistent Homology of the Cosmic Web. I: Hierarchical Topology in \$\Lambda\$CDM Cosmologies (2021)

    Georg Wilding, Keimpe Nevenzeel, Rien van de Weygaert, Gert Vegter, Pratyush Pranav, Bernard J. T. Jones, Konstantinos Efstathiou, Job Feldbrugge
    Abstract Using a set of \$\Lambda\$CDM simulations of cosmic structure formation, we study the evolving connectivity and changing topological structure of the cosmic web using state-of-the-art tools of multiscale topological data analysis (TDA). We follow the development of the cosmic web topology in terms of the evolution of Betti number curves and feature persistence diagrams of the three (topological) classes of structural features: matter concentrations, filaments and tunnels, and voids. The Betti curves specify the prominence of features as a function of density level, and their evolution with cosmic epoch reflects the changing network connections between these structural features. The persistence diagrams quantify the longevity and stability of topological features. In this study we establish, for the first time, the link between persistence diagrams, the features they show, and the gravitationally driven cosmic structure formation process. By following the diagrams' development over cosmic time, the link between the multiscale topology of the cosmic web and the hierarchical buildup of cosmic structure is established. The sharp apexes in the diagrams are intimately related to key transitions in the structure formation process. The apex in the matter concentration diagrams coincides with the density level at which, typically, they detach from the Hubble expansion and begin to collapse. At that level many individual islands merge to form the network of the cosmic web and a large number of filaments and tunnels emerge to establish its connecting bridges. The location trends of the apex possess a self-similar character that can be related to the cosmic web's hierarchical buildup. We find that persistence diagrams provide a significantly higher and more profound level of information on the structure formation process than more global summary statistics like Euler characteristic or Betti numbers.
  10. Development of the Functional Connectome Topology in Adolescence: Evidence From Topological Data Analysis (2021)

    Zeus Gracia-Tabuenca, Juan Carlos Díaz-Patiño, Isaac Arelio, Martha Beatriz Moreno, Fernando A. Barrios, Sarael Alcauter
    Abstract Adolescence is a crucial developmental period in terms of behavior and mental health. Therefore, understanding how the brain develops during this stage is a fundamental challenge for neuroscience. Recent studies have modelled the brain as a network or connectome, mainly applying measures from graph theory, showing a change in its functional organization such as an increase in its segregation and integration. Topological Data Analysis (TDA) complements such modelling by extracting high-dimensional features across the whole range of connectivity values, instead of exploring a fixed set of connections. This study enquiries into the developmental trajectories of such properties using a longitudinal sample of typically developing participants (N = 98; 53/45 F/M; 6.7-18.1 years), applying TDA into their functional connectomes. In addition, we explore the effect of puberty on the individual developmental trajectories. Results showed that compared to random networks, the adolescent brain is more segregated at the global level, but more densely connected at the local level. Furthermore, developmental effects showed nonlinear trajectories for the integration of the whole brain and fronto-parietal networks, with an inflection point and increasing trajectories after puberty onset. These results add to the insights in the development of the functional organization of the adolescent. Significance Statement Topological Data Analysis may be used to explore the topology of the brain along the whole range of connectivity values instead of selecting only a fixed set of connectivity thresholds. Here, we explored some properties of the topology of the brain functional connectome, and how they develop in adolescence. First, we show that developmental trajectories are nonlinear and better explained by the puberty status than chronological age, with an inflection point around the puberty onset. The greatest effect is the increase in functional integration for the whole brain, and particularly for the Fronto-Parietal Network when exploring functional subnetworks.
  11. Quantification of the Immune Content in Neuroblastoma: Deep Learning and Topological Data Analysis in Digital Pathology (2021)

    Nicole Bussola, Bruno Papa, Ombretta Melaiu, Aurora Castellano, Doriana Fruci, Giuseppe Jurman
    Abstract We introduce here a novel machine learning (ML) framework to address the issue of the quantitative assessment of the immune content in neuroblastoma (NB) specimens. First, the EUNet, a U-Net with an EfficientNet encoder, is trained to detect lymphocytes on tissue digital slides stained with the CD3 T-cell marker. The training set consists of 3782 images extracted from an original collection of 54 whole slide images (WSIs), manually annotated for a total of 73,751 lymphocytes. Resampling strategies, data augmentation, and transfer learning approaches are adopted to warrant reproducibility and to reduce the risk of overfitting and selection bias. Topological data analysis (TDA) is then used to define activation maps from different layers of the neural network at different stages of the training process, described by persistence diagrams (PD) and Betti curves. TDA is further integrated with the uniform manifold approximation and projection (UMAP) dimensionality reduction and the hierarchical density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (HDBSCAN) algorithm for clustering, by the deep features, the relevant subgroups and structures, across different levels of the neural network. Finally, the recent TwoNN approach is leveraged to study the variation of the intrinsic dimensionality of the U-Net model. As the main task, the proposed pipeline is employed to evaluate the density of lymphocytes over the whole tissue area of the WSIs. The model achieves good results with mean absolute error 3.1 on test set, showing significant agreement between densities estimated by our EUNet model and by trained pathologists, thus indicating the potentialities of a promising new strategy in the quantification of the immune content in NB specimens. Moreover, the UMAP algorithm unveiled interesting patterns compatible with pathological characteristics, also highlighting novel insights into the dynamics of the intrinsic dataset dimensionality at different stages of the training process. All the experiments were run on the Microsoft Azure cloud platform.
  12. Topological Data Analysis for Arrhythmia Detection Through Modular Neural Networks (2020)

    Meryll Dindin, Yuhei Umeda, Frederic Chazal
    Abstract This paper presents an innovative and generic deep learning approach to monitor heart conditions from ECG signals. We focus our attention on both the detection and classification of abnormal heartbeats, known as arrhythmia. We strongly insist on generalization throughout the construction of a shallow deep-learning model that turns out to be effective for new unseen patient. The novelty of our approach relies on the use of topological data analysis to deal with individual differences. We show that our structure reaches the performances of the state-of-the-art methods for both arrhythmia detection and classification.
  13. Prediction in Cancer Genomics Using Topological Signatures and Machine Learning (2020)

    Georgina Gonzalez, Arina Ushakova, Radmila Sazdanovic, Javier Arsuaga
    Abstract Copy Number Aberrations, gains and losses of genomic regions, are a hallmark of cancer and can be experimentally detected using microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). In previous works, we developed a topology based method to analyze aCGH data whose output are regions of the genome where copy number is altered in patients with a predetermined cancer phenotype. We call this method Topological Analysis of array CGH (TAaCGH). Here we combine TAaCGH with machine learning techniques to build classifiers using copy number aberrations. We chose logistic regression on two different binary phenotypes related to breast cancer to illustrate this approach. The first case consists of patients with over-expression of the ERBB2 gene. Over-expression of ERBB2 is commonly regulated by a copy number gain in chromosome arm 17q. TAaCGH found the region 17q11-q22 associated with the phenotype and using logistic regression we reduced this region to 17q12-q21.31 correctly classifying 78% of the ERBB2 positive individuals (sensitivity) in a validation data set. We also analyzed over-expression in Estrogen Receptor (ER), a second phenotype commonly observed in breast cancer patients and found that the region 5p14.3-12 together with six full arms were associated with the phenotype. Our method identified 4p, 6p and 16q as the strongest predictors correctly classifying 76% of ER positives in our validation data set. However, for this set there was a significant increase in the false positive rate (specificity). We suggest that topological and machine learning methods can be combined for prediction of phenotypes using genetic data.
  14. Topological Data Analysis Reveals Robust Alterations in the Whole-Brain and Frontal Lobe Functional Connectomes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (2020)

    Zeus Gracia-Tabuenca, Juan Carlos Díaz-Patiño, Isaac Arelio, Sarael Alcauter
    Abstract Visual Abstract \textlessimg class="highwire-fragment fragment-image" alt="Figure" src="https://www.eneuro.org/content/eneuro/7/3/ENEURO.0543-19.2020/F1.medium.gif" width="369" height="440"/\textgreaterDownload figureOpen in new tabDownload powerpoint Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder characterized by difficulty to control the own behavior. Neuroimaging studies have related ADHD with the interplay of fronto-parietal attention systems with the default mode network (DMN; Castellanos and Aoki, 2016). However, some results have been inconsistent, potentially due to methodological differences in the analytical strategies when defining the brain functional network, i.e., the functional connectivity threshold and/or the brain parcellation scheme. Here, we make use of topological data analysis (TDA) to explore the brain connectome as a function of the filtration value (i.e., the connectivity threshold), instead of using a static connectivity threshold. Specifically, we characterized the transition from all nodes being isolated to being connected into a single component as a function of the filtration value. We explored the utility of such a method to identify differences between 81 children with ADHD (45 male, age: 7.26–17.61 years old) and 96 typically developing children (TDC; 59 male, age: 7.17–17.96 years old), using a public dataset of resting state (rs)fMRI in human subjects. Results were highly congruent when using four different brain segmentations (atlases), and exhibited significant differences for the brain topology of children with ADHD, both at the whole-brain network and the functional subnetwork levels, particularly involving the frontal lobe and the DMN. Therefore, this is a solid approach that complements connectomics-related methods and may contribute to identify the neurophysio-pathology of ADHD.
  15. Clique Topology Reveals Intrinsic Geometric Structure in Neural Correlations (2015)

    Chad Giusti, Eva Pastalkova, Carina Curto, Vladimir Itskov
    Abstract Detecting structure in neural activity is critical for understanding the function of neural circuits. The coding properties of neurons are typically investigated by correlating their responses to external stimuli. It is not clear, however, if the structure of neural activity can be inferred intrinsically, without a priori knowledge of the relevant stimuli. We introduce a novel method, called clique topology, that detects intrinsic structure in neural activity that is invariant under nonlinear monotone transformations. Using pairwise correlations of neurons in the hippocampus, we demonstrate that our method is capable of detecting geometric structure from neural activity alone, without appealing to external stimuli or receptive fields.Detecting meaningful structure in neural activity and connectivity data is challenging in the presence of hidden nonlinearities, where traditional eigenvalue-based methods may be misleading. We introduce a novel approach to matrix analysis, called clique topology, that extracts features of the data invariant under nonlinear monotone transformations. These features can be used to detect both random and geometric structure, and depend only on the relative ordering of matrix entries. We then analyzed the activity of pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampus, recorded while the animal was exploring a 2D environment, and confirmed that our method is able to detect geometric organization using only the intrinsic pattern of neural correlations. Remarkably, we found similar results during nonspatial behaviors such as wheel running and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This suggests that the geometric structure of correlations is shaped by the underlying hippocampal circuits and is not merely a consequence of position coding. We propose that clique topology is a powerful new tool for matrix analysis in biological settings, where the relationship of observed quantities to more meaningful variables is often nonlinear and unknown.
  16. Multiphase Mixing Quantification by Computational Homology and Imaging Analysis (2011)

    Jianxin Xu, Hua Wang, Hui Fang
    Abstract The purpose of this study is to introduce a new technique for quantifying the efficiency of multiphase mixing. This technique based on algebraic topology is illustrated by using the hydraulic modeling of gas agitated reactors stirred by top lance gas injection and image analysis. The zeroth Betti numbers are used to estimate the numbers of pieces in the patterns, leading to a useful parameter to characterize the mixture homogeneity. The first Betti numbers are introduced to characterize the nonhomogeneity of the mixture. The mixing efficiency can be characterized by the Betti numbers for binary images of the patterns. This novel method may be applied for studying a variety of multiphase mixing problems in which multiphase components or tracers are visually distinguishable.