🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001371s)
  1. Weighted-Persistent-Homology-Based Machine Learning for RNA Flexibility Analysis (2020)

    Chi Seng Pun, Brandon Yung Sin Yong, Kelin Xia
    Abstract With the great significance of biomolecular flexibility in biomolecular dynamics and functional analysis, various experimental and theoretical models are developed. Experimentally, Debye-Waller factor, also known as B-factor, measures atomic mean-square displacement and is usually considered as an important measurement for flexibility. Theoretically, elastic network models, Gaussian network model, flexibility-rigidity model, and other computational models have been proposed for flexibility analysis by shedding light on the biomolecular inner topological structures. Recently, a topology-based machine learning model has been proposed. By using the features from persistent homology, this model achieves a remarkable high Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) in protein B-factor prediction. Motivated by its success, we propose weighted-persistent-homology (WPH)-based machine learning (WPHML) models for RNA flexibility analysis. Our WPH is a newly-proposed model, which incorporate physical, chemical and biological information into topological measurements using a weight function. In particular, we use local persistent homology (LPH) to focus on the topological information of local regions. Our WPHML model is validated on a well-established RNA dataset, and numerical experiments show that our model can achieve a PCC of up to 0.5822. The comparison with the previous sequence-information-based learning models shows that a consistent improvement in performance by at least 10% is achieved in our current model.
  2. Weighted Persistent Homology for Biomolecular Data Analysis (2020)

    Zhenyu Meng, D. Vijay Anand, Yunpeng Lu, Jie Wu, Kelin Xia
    Abstract In this paper, we systematically review weighted persistent homology (WPH) models and their applications in biomolecular data analysis. Essentially, the weight value, which reflects physical, chemical and biological properties, can be assigned to vertices (atom centers), edges (bonds), or higher order simplexes (cluster of atoms), depending on the biomolecular structure, function, and dynamics properties. Further, we propose the first localized weighted persistent homology (LWPH). Inspired by the great success of element specific persistent homology (ESPH), we do not treat biomolecules as an inseparable system like all previous weighted models, instead we decompose them into a series of local domains, which may be overlapped with each other. The general persistent homology or weighted persistent homology analysis is then applied on each of these local domains. In this way, functional properties, that are embedded in local structures, can be revealed. Our model has been applied to systematically study DNA structures. It has been found that our LWPH based features can be used to successfully discriminate the A-, B-, and Z-types of DNA. More importantly, our LWPH based principal component analysis (PCA) model can identify two configurational states of DNA structures in ion liquid environment, which can be revealed only by the complicated helical coordinate system. The great consistence with the helical-coordinate model demonstrates that our model captures local structure variations so well that it is comparable with geometric models. Moreover, geometric measurements are usually defined in local regions. For instance, the helical-coordinate system is limited to one or two basepairs. However, our LWPH can quantitatively characterize structure information in regions or domains with arbitrary sizes and shapes, where traditional geometrical measurements fail.