🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 6 matches in 0.002063s)
  1. Community Structures in Simplicial Complexes: An Application to Wildlife Corridor Designing in Central India -- Eastern Ghats Landscape Complex, India (2020)

    Saurabh Shanu, Shashankaditya Upadhyay, Arijit Roy, Raghunandan Chundawat, Sudeepto Bhattacharya
    Abstract The concept of simplicial complex from Algebraic Topology is applied to understand and model the flow of genetic information, processes and organisms between the areas of unimpaired habitats to design a network of wildlife corridors for Tigers (Panthera Tigris Tigris) in Central India Eastern Ghats landscape complex. The work extends and improves on a previous work that has made use of the concept of minimum spanning tree obtained from the weighted graph in the focal landscape, which suggested a viable corridor network for the tiger population of the Protected Areas (PAs) in the landscape complex. Centralities of the network identify the habitat patches and the critical parameters that are central to the process of tiger movement across the network. We extend the concept of vertex centrality to that of the simplicial centrality yielding inter-vertices adjacency and connection. As a result, the ecological information propagates expeditiously and even on a local scale in these networks representing a well-integrated and self-explanatory model as a community structure. A simplicial complex network based on the network centralities calculated in the landscape matrix presents a tiger corridor network in the landscape complex that is proposed to correspond better to reality than the previously proposed model. Because of the aforementioned functional and structural properties of the network, the work proposes an ecological network of corridors for the most tenable usage by the tiger populations both in the PAs and outside the PAs in the focal landscape.
  2. Model Comparison via Simplicial Complexes and Persistent Homology (2020)

    Sean T. Vittadello, Michael P. H. Stumpf
    Abstract In many scientific and technological contexts we have only a poor understanding of the structure and details of appropriate mathematical models. We often need to compare different models. With available data we can use formal statistical model selection to compare and contrast the ability of different mathematical models to describe such data. But there is a lack of rigorous methods to compare different models \emph\a priori\. Here we develop and illustrate two such approaches that allow us to compare model structures in a systematic way. Using well-developed and understood concepts from simplicial geometry we are able to define a distance based on the persistent homology applied to the simplicial complexes that captures the model structure. In this way we can identify shared topological features of different models. We then expand this, and move from a distance between simplicial complexes to studying equivalences between models in order to determine their functional relatedness.
  3. The Topology of Higher-Order Complexes Associated With Brain Hubs in Human Connectomes (2020)

    Miroslav Andjelković, Bosiljka Tadić, Roderick Melnik
    Abstract Higher-order connectivity in complex systems described by simplexes of different orders provides a geometry for simplex-based dynamical variables and interactions. Simplicial complexes that constitute a functional geometry of the human connectome can be crucial for the brain complex dynamics. In this context, the best-connected brain areas, designated as hub nodes, play a central role in supporting integrated brain function. Here, we study the structure of simplicial complexes attached to eight global hubs in the female and male connectomes and identify the core networks among the affected brain regions. These eight hubs (Putamen, Caudate, Hippocampus and Thalamus-Proper in the left and right cerebral hemisphere) are the highest-ranking according to their topological dimension, defined as the number of simplexes of all orders in which the node participates. Furthermore, we analyse the weight-dependent heterogeneity of simplexes. We demonstrate changes in the structure of identified core networks and topological entropy when the threshold weight is gradually increased. These results highlight the role of higher-order interactions in human brain networks and provide additional evidence for (dis)similarity between the female and male connectomes.
  4. Possible Clinical Use of Big Data: Personal Brain Connectomics (2018)

    Dong Soo Lee
    Abstract The biggest data is brain imaging data, which waited for clinical use during the last three decades. Topographic data interpretation prevailed for the first two decades, and only during the last decade, connectivity or connectomics data began to be analyzed properly. Owing to topological data interpretation and timely introduction of likelihood method based on hierarchical generalized linear model, we now foresee the clinical use of personal connectomics for classification and prediction of disease prognosis for brain diseases without any clue by currently available diagnostic methods.
  5. What Can Topology Tell Us About the Neural Code? (2017)

    Carina Curto
    Abstract Neuroscience is undergoing a period of rapid experimental progress and expansion. New mathematical tools, previously unknown in the neuroscience community, are now being used to tackle fundamental questions and analyze emerging data sets. Consistent with this trend, the last decade has seen an uptick in the use of topological ideas and methods in neuroscience. In this paper I will survey recent applications of topology in neuroscience, and explain why topology is an especially natural tool for understanding neural codes.
  6. Persistence Images: A Stable Vector Representation of Persistent Homology (2017)

    Henry Adams, Tegan Emerson, Michael Kirby, Rachel Neville, Chris Peterson, Patrick Shipman, Sofya Chepushtanova, Eric Hanson, Francis Motta, Lori Ziegelmeier
    Abstract Many data sets can be viewed as a noisy sampling of an underlying space, and tools from topological data analysis can characterize this structure for the purpose of knowledge discovery. One such tool is persistent homology, which provides a multiscale description of the homological features within a data set. A useful representation of this homological information is a persistence diagram (PD). Efforts have been made to map PDs into spaces with additional structure valuable to machine learning tasks. We convert a PD to a finite-dimensional vector representation which we call a persistence image (PI), and prove the stability of this transformation with respect to small perturbations in the inputs. The discriminatory power of PIs is compared against existing methods, showing significant performance gains. We explore the use of PIs with vector-based machine learning tools, such as linear sparse support vector machines, which identify features containing discriminating topological information. Finally, high accuracy inference of parameter values from the dynamic output of a discrete dynamical system (the linked twist map) and a partial differential equation (the anisotropic Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation) provide a novel application of the discriminatory power of PIs.