🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 6 matches in 0.001547s)
  1. Genomics Data Analysis via Spectral Shape and Topology (2022)

    Erik J. Amézquita, Farzana Nasrin, Kathleen M. Storey, Masato Yoshizawa
    Abstract Mapper, a topological algorithm, is frequently used as an exploratory tool to build a graphical representation of data. This representation can help to gain a better understanding of the intrinsic shape of high-dimensional genomic data and to retain information that may be lost using standard dimension-reduction algorithms. We propose a novel workflow to process and analyze RNA-seq data from tumor and healthy subjects integrating Mapper and differential gene expression. Precisely, we show that a Gaussian mixture approximation method can be used to produce graphical structures that successfully separate tumor and healthy subjects, and produce two subgroups of tumor subjects. A further analysis using DESeq2, a popular tool for the detection of differentially expressed genes, shows that these two subgroups of tumor cells bear two distinct gene regulations, suggesting two discrete paths for forming lung cancer, which could not be highlighted by other popular clustering methods, including t-SNE. Although Mapper shows promise in analyzing high-dimensional data, building tools to statistically analyze Mapper graphical structures is limited in the existing literature. In this paper, we develop a scoring method using heat kernel signatures that provides an empirical setting for statistical inferences such as hypothesis testing, sensitivity analysis, and correlation analysis.
  2. Identification of Relevant Genetic Alterations in Cancer Using Topological Data Analysis (2020)

    Raúl Rabadán, Yamina Mohamedi, Udi Rubin, Tim Chu, Adam N. Alghalith, Oliver Elliott, Luis Arnés, Santiago Cal, Álvaro J. Obaya, Arnold J. Levine, Pablo G. Cámara
    Abstract Large-scale cancer genomic studies enable the systematic identification of mutations that lead to the genesis and progression of tumors, uncovering the underlying molecular mechanisms and potential therapies. While some such mutations are recurrently found in many tumors, many others exist solely within a few samples, precluding detection by conventional recurrence-based statistical approaches. Integrated analysis of somatic mutations and RNA expression data across 12 tumor types reveals that mutations of cancer genes are usually accompanied by substantial changes in expression. We use topological data analysis to leverage this observation and uncover 38 elusive candidate cancer-associated genes, including inactivating mutations of the metalloproteinase ADAMTS12 in lung adenocarcinoma. We show that ADAMTS12−/− mice have a five-fold increase in the susceptibility to develop lung tumors, confirming the role of ADAMTS12 as a tumor suppressor gene. Our results demonstrate that data integration through topological techniques can increase our ability to identify previously unreported cancer-related alterations., Rare cancer mutations are often missed using recurrence-based statistical approaches, but are usually accompanied by changes in expression. Here the authors leverage this information to uncover several elusive candidate cancer-associated genes using topological data analysis.
  3. A Topological Data Analysis Approach On Predicting Phenotypes From Gene Expression Data (2020)

    Sayan Mandal, Aldo Guzmán-Sáenz, Niina Haiminen, Saugata Basu, Laxmi Parida
    Abstract The goal of this study was to investigate if gene expression measured from RNA sequencing contains enough signal to separate healthy and afflicted individuals in the context of phenotype prediction. We observed that standard machine learning methods alone performed somewhat poorly on the disease phenotype prediction task; therefore we devised an approach augmenting machine learning with topological data analysis., We describe a framework for predicting phenotype values by utilizing gene expression data transformed into sample-specific topological signatures by employing feature subsampling and persistent homology. The topological data analysis approach developed in this work yielded improved results on Parkinson’s disease phenotype prediction when measured against standard machine learning methods., This study confirms that gene expression can be a useful indicator of the presence or absence of a condition, and the subtle signal contained in this high dimensional data reveals itself when considering the intricate topological connections between expressed genes.
  4. Persistent Homology Analysis of Brain Transcriptome Data in Autism (2019)

    Daniel Shnier, Mircea A. Voineagu, Irina Voineagu
    Abstract Persistent homology methods have found applications in the analysis of multiple types of biological data, particularly imaging data or data with a spatial and/or temporal component. However, few studies have assessed the use of persistent homology for the analysis of gene expression data. Here we apply persistent homology methods to investigate the global properties of gene expression in post-mortem brain tissue (cerebral cortex) of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and matched controls. We observe a significant difference in the geometry of inter-sample relationships between autism and healthy controls as measured by the sum of the death times of zero-dimensional components and the Euler characteristic. This observation is replicated across two distinct datasets, and we interpret it as evidence for an increased heterogeneity of gene expression in autism. We also assessed the topology of gene-level point clouds and did not observe significant differences between ASD and control transcriptomes, suggesting that the overall transcriptome organization is similar in ASD and healthy cerebral cortex. Overall, our study provides a novel framework for persistent homology analyses of gene expression data for genetically complex disorders.
  5. Rootstock Effects on Scion Phenotypes in a ‘Chambourcin’ Experimental Vineyard (2019)

    Zoë Migicovsky, Zachary N Harris, Laura L Klein, Mao Li, Adam McDermaid, Daniel H Chitwood, Anne Fennell, Laszlo G Kovacs, Misha Kwasniewski, Jason P Londo, Qin Ma, Allison J Miller
    Abstract Understanding how root systems modulate shoot system phenotypes is a fundamental question in plant biology and will be useful in developing resilient agricultural crops. Grafting is a common horticultural practice that joins the roots (rootstock) of one plant to the shoot (scion) of another, providing an excellent method for investigating how these two organ systems affect each other. In this study, we used the French-American hybrid grapevine ‘Chambourcin’ (Vitis L.) as a model to explore the rootstock–scion relationship. We examined leaf shape, ion concentrations, and gene expression in ‘Chambourcin’ grown ungrafted as well as grafted to three different rootstocks (‘SO4’, ‘1103P’ and ‘3309C’) across 2 years and three different irrigation treatments. We found that a significant amount of the variation in leaf shape could be explained by the interaction between rootstock and irrigation. For ion concentrations, the primary source of variation identified was the position of a leaf in a shoot, although rootstock and rootstock by irrigation interaction also explained a significant amount of variation for most ions. Lastly, we found rootstock-specific patterns of gene expression in grafted plants when compared to ungrafted vines. Thus, our work reveals the subtle and complex effect of grafting on ‘Chambourcin’ leaf morphology, ionomics, and gene expression.
  6. Single-Cell Topological RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Insights Into Cellular Differentiation and Development (2017)

    Abbas H. Rizvi, Pablo G. Camara, Elena K. Kandror, Thomas J. Roberts, Ira Schieren, Tom Maniatis, Raul Rabadan
    Abstract Transcriptional programs control cellular lineage commitment and differentiation during development. Understanding cell fate has been advanced by studying single-cell RNA-seq, but is limited by the assumptions of current analytic methods regarding the structure of data. We present single-cell topological data analysis (scTDA), an algorithm for topology-based computational analyses to study temporal, unbiased transcriptional regulation. Compared to other methods, scTDA is a non-linear, model-independent, unsupervised statistical framework that can characterize transient cellular states. We applied scTDA to the analysis of murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation in vitro in response to inducers of motor neuron differentiation. scTDA resolved asynchrony and continuity in cellular identity over time, and identified four transient states (pluripotent, precursor, progenitor, and fully differentiated cells) based on changes in stage-dependent combinations of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins and long non-coding RNAs. scTDA can be applied to study asynchronous cellular responses to either developmental cues or environmental perturbations.