🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.00163s)
  1. Stable Topological Summaries for Analyzing the Organization of Cells in a Packed Tissue (2021)

    Nieves Atienza, Maria-Jose Jimenez, Manuel Soriano-Trigueros
    Abstract We use topological data analysis tools for studying the inner organization of cells in segmented images of epithelial tissues. More specifically, for each segmented image, we compute different persistence barcodes, which codify the lifetime of homology classes (persistent homology) along different filtrations (increasing nested sequences of simplicial complexes) that are built from the regions representing the cells in the tissue. We use a complete and well-grounded set of numerical variables over those persistence barcodes, also known as topological summaries. A novel combination of normalization methods for both the set of input segmented images and the produced barcodes allows for the proven stability results for those variables with respect to small changes in the input, as well as invariance to image scale. Our study provides new insights to this problem, such as a possible novel indicator for the development of the drosophila wing disc tissue or the importance of centroids’ distribution to differentiate some tissues from their CVT-path counterpart (a mathematical model of epithelia based on Voronoi diagrams). We also show how the use of topological summaries may improve the classification accuracy of epithelial images using a Random Forest algorithm.
  2. Topological Data Analysis of Collective and Individual Epithelial Cells Using Persistent Homology of Loops (2021)

    Dhananjay Bhaskar, William Y. Zhang, Ian Y. Wong
    Abstract Interacting, self-propelled particles such as epithelial cells can dynamically self-organize into complex multicellular patterns, which are challenging to classify without a priori information. Classically, different phases and phase transitions have been described based on local ordering, which may not capture structural features at larger length scales. Instead, topological data analysis (TDA) determines the stability of spatial connectivity at varying length scales (i.e. persistent homology), and can compare different particle configurations based on the “cost” of reorganizing one configuration into another. Here, we demonstrate a topology-based machine learning approach for unsupervised profiling of individual and collective phases based on large-scale loops. We show that these topological loops (i.e. dimension 1 homology) are robust to variations in particle number and density, particularly in comparison to connected components (i.e. dimension 0 homology). We use TDA to map out phase diagrams for simulated particles with varying adhesion and propulsion, at constant population size as well as when proliferation is permitted. Next, we use this approach to profile our recent experiments on the clustering of epithelial cells in varying growth factor conditions, which are compared to our simulations. Finally, we characterize the robustness of this approach at varying length scales, with sparse sampling, and over time. Overall, we envision TDA will be broadly applicable as a model-agnostic approach to analyze active systems with varying population size, from cytoskeletal motors to motile cells to flocking or swarming animals.
  3. Characterising Epithelial Tissues Using Persistent Entropy (2019)

    N. Atienza, L. M. Escudero, M. J. Jimenez, M. Soriano-Trigueros
    Abstract In this paper, we apply persistent entropy, a novel topological statistic, for characterization of images of epithelial tissues. We have found out that persistent entropy is able to summarize topological and geometric information encoded by \$\$\alpha \$\$α-complexes and persistent homology. After using some statistical tests, we can guarantee the existence of significant differences in the studied tissues.