🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 5 matches in 0.00183s)
  1. Topology-Aware Segmentation Using Discrete Morse Theory (2021)

    Xiaoling Hu, Yusu Wang, Li Fuxin, Dimitris Samaras, Chao Chen
    Abstract In the segmentation of fine-scale structures from natural and biomedical images, per-pixel accuracy is not the only metric of concern. Topological correctness, such as vessel connectivity and membrane closure, is crucial for downstream analysis tasks. In this paper, we propose a new approach to train deep image segmentation networks for better topological accuracy. In particular, leveraging the power of discrete Morse theory (DMT), we identify global structures, including 1D skeletons and 2D patches, which are important for topological accuracy. Trained with a novel loss based on these global structures, the network performance is significantly improved especially near topologically challenging locations (such as weak spots of connections and membranes). On diverse datasets, our method achieves superior performance on both the DICE score and topological metrics.
  2. RGB Image-Based Data Analysis via Discrete Morse Theory and Persistent Homology (2018)

    Chuan Du, Christopher Szul, Adarsh Manawa, Nima Rasekh, Rosemary Guzman, Ruth Davidson
    Abstract Understanding and comparing images for the purposes of data analysis is currently a very computationally demanding task. A group at Australian National University (ANU) recently developed open-source code that can detect fundamental topological features of a grayscale image in a computationally feasible manner. This is made possible by the fact that computers store grayscale images as cubical cellular complexes. These complexes can be studied using the techniques of discrete Morse theory. We expand the functionality of the ANU code by introducing methods and software for analyzing images encoded in red, green, and blue (RGB), because this image encoding is very popular for publicly available data. Our methods allow the extraction of key topological information from RGB images via informative persistence diagrams by introducing novel methods for transforming RGB-to-grayscale. This paradigm allows us to perform data analysis directly on RGB images representing water scarcity variability as well as crime variability. We introduce software enabling a a user to predict future image properties, towards the eventual aim of more rapid image-based data behavior prediction.
  3. Morse Theory and Persistent Homology for Topological Analysis of 3D Images of Complex Materials (2014)

    O. Delgado-Friedrichs, V. Robins, A. Sheppard
    Abstract We develop topologically accurate and compatible definitions for the skeleton and watershed segmentation of a 3D digital object that are computed by a single algorithm. These definitions are based on a discrete gradient vector field derived from a signed distance transform. This gradient vector field is amenable to topological analysis and simplification via For-man's discrete Morse theory and provides a filtration that can be used as input to persistent homology algorithms. Efficient implementations allow us to process large-scale x-ray micro-CT data of rock cores and other materials.
  4. Theory and Algorithms for Constructing Discrete Morse Complexes From Grayscale Digital Images (2011)

    V. Robins, P. J. Wood, A. P. Sheppard
    Abstract We present an algorithm for determining the Morse complex of a two or three-dimensional grayscale digital image. Each cell in the Morse complex corresponds to a topological change in the level sets (i.e., a critical point) of the grayscale image. Since more than one critical point may be associated with a single image voxel, we model digital images by cubical complexes. A new homotopic algorithm is used to construct a discrete Morse function on the cubical complex that agrees with the digital image and has exactly the number and type of critical cells necessary to characterize the topological changes in the level sets. We make use of discrete Morse theory and simple homotopy theory to prove correctness of this algorithm. The resulting Morse complex is considerably simpler than the cubical complex originally used to represent the image and may be used to compute persistent homology.