🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001085s)
  1. A Topological Machine Learning Pipeline for Classification (2022)

    Francesco Conti, Davide Moroni, Maria Antonietta Pascali
    Abstract In this work, we develop a pipeline that associates Persistence Diagrams to digital data via the most appropriate filtration for the type of data considered. Using a grid search approach, this pipeline determines optimal representation methods and parameters. The development of such a topological pipeline for Machine Learning involves two crucial steps that strongly affect its performance: firstly, digital data must be represented as an algebraic object with a proper associated filtration in order to compute its topological summary, the Persistence Diagram. Secondly, the persistence diagram must be transformed with suitable representation methods in order to be introduced in a Machine Learning algorithm. We assess the performance of our pipeline, and in parallel, we compare the different representation methods on popular benchmark datasets. This work is a first step toward both an easy and ready-to-use pipeline for data classification using persistent homology and Machine Learning, and to understand the theoretical reasons why, given a dataset and a task to be performed, a pair (filtration, topological representation) is better than another.
  2. The Weighted Euler Curve Transform for Shape and Image Analysis (2020)

    Qitong Jiang, Sebastian Kurtek, Tom Needham
    Abstract The Euler Curve Transform (ECT) of Turner et al. is a complete invariant of an embedded simplicial complex, which is amenable to statistical analysis. We generalize the ECT to provide a similarly convenient representation for weighted simplicial complexes, objects which arise naturally, for example, in certain medical imaging applications. We leverage work of Ghrist et al. on Euler integral calculus to prove that this invariant—dubbed the Weighted Euler Curve Transform (WECT)—is also complete. We explain how to transform a segmented region of interest in a grayscale image into a weighted simplicial complex and then into a WECT representation. This WECT representation is applied to study Glioblastoma Multiforme brain tumor shape and texture data. We show that the WECT representation is effective at clustering tumors based on qualitative shape and texture features and that this clustering correlates with patient survival time.