🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001276s)
  1. Topological Data Analysis for Arrhythmia Detection Through Modular Neural Networks (2020)

    Meryll Dindin, Yuhei Umeda, Frederic Chazal
    Abstract This paper presents an innovative and generic deep learning approach to monitor heart conditions from ECG signals. We focus our attention on both the detection and classification of abnormal heartbeats, known as arrhythmia. We strongly insist on generalization throughout the construction of a shallow deep-learning model that turns out to be effective for new unseen patient. The novelty of our approach relies on the use of topological data analysis to deal with individual differences. We show that our structure reaches the performances of the state-of-the-art methods for both arrhythmia detection and classification.
  2. Fast and Accurate Tumor Segmentation of Histology Images Using Persistent Homology and Deep Convolutional Features (2019)

    Talha Qaiser, Yee-Wah Tsang, Daiki Taniyama, Naoya Sakamoto, Kazuaki Nakane, David Epstein, Nasir Rajpoot
    Abstract Tumor segmentation in whole-slide images of histology slides is an important step towards computer-assisted diagnosis. In this work, we propose a tumor segmentation framework based on the novel concept of persistent homology profiles (PHPs). For a given image patch, the homology profiles are derived by efficient computation of persistent homology, which is an algebraic tool from homology theory. We propose an efficient way of computing topological persistence of an image, alternative to simplicial homology. The PHPs are devised to distinguish tumor regions from their normal counterparts by modeling the atypical characteristics of tumor nuclei. We propose two variants of our method for tumor segmentation: one that targets speed without compromising accuracy and the other that targets higher accuracy. The fast version is based on a selection of exemplar image patches from a convolution neural network (CNN) and patch classification by quantifying the divergence between the PHPs of exemplars and the input image patch. Detailed comparative evaluation shows that the proposed algorithm is significantly faster than competing algorithms while achieving comparable results. The accurate version combines the PHPs and high-level CNN features and employs a multi-stage ensemble strategy for image patch labeling. Experimental results demonstrate that the combination of PHPs and CNN features outperform competing algorithms. This study is performed on two independently collected colorectal datasets containing adenoma, adenocarcinoma, signet, and healthy cases. Collectively, the accurate tumor segmentation produces the highest average patch-level F1-score, as compared with competing algorithms, on malignant and healthy cases from both the datasets. Overall the proposed framework highlights the utility of persistent homology for histopathology image analysis.