🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 5 matches in 0.00133s)
  1. Topological Data Analysis of Zebrafish Patterns (2020)

    Melissa R. McGuirl, Alexandria Volkening, Björn Sandstede
    Abstract Self-organized pattern behavior is ubiquitous throughout nature, from fish schooling to collective cell dynamics during organism development. Qualitatively these patterns display impressive consistency, yet variability inevitably exists within pattern-forming systems on both microscopic and macroscopic scales. Quantifying variability and measuring pattern features can inform the underlying agent interactions and allow for predictive analyses. Nevertheless, current methods for analyzing patterns that arise from collective behavior capture only macroscopic features or rely on either manual inspection or smoothing algorithms that lose the underlying agent-based nature of the data. Here we introduce methods based on topological data analysis and interpretable machine learning for quantifying both agent-level features and global pattern attributes on a large scale. Because the zebrafish is a model organism for skin pattern formation, we focus specifically on analyzing its skin patterns as a means of illustrating our approach. Using a recent agent-based model, we simulate thousands of wild-type and mutant zebrafish patterns and apply our methodology to better understand pattern variability in zebrafish. Our methodology is able to quantify the differential impact of stochasticity in cell interactions on wild-type and mutant patterns, and we use our methods to predict stripe and spot statistics as a function of varying cellular communication. Our work provides an approach to automatically quantifying biological patterns and analyzing agent-based dynamics so that we can now answer critical questions in pattern formation at a much larger scale.
  2. Finding Universal Structures in Quantum Many-Body Dynamics via Persistent Homology (2020)

    Daniel Spitz, Jürgen Berges, Markus K. Oberthaler, Anna Wienhard
    Abstract Inspired by topological data analysis techniques, we introduce persistent homology observables and apply them in a geometric analysis of the dynamics of quantum field theories. As a prototype application, we consider simulated data of a two-dimensional Bose gas far from equilibrium. We discover a continuous spectrum of dynamical scaling exponents, which provides a refined classification of nonequilibrium universal phenomena. A possible explanation of the underlying processes is provided in terms of mixing wave turbulence and vortex kinetics components in point clouds. We find that the persistent homology scaling exponents are inherently linked to the geometry of the system, as the derivation of a packing relation reveals. The approach opens new ways of analyzing quantum many-body dynamics in terms of robust topological structures beyond standard field theoretic techniques.
  3. Capturing Dynamics of Time-Varying Data via Topology (2020)

    Lu Xian, Henry Adams, Chad M. Topaz, Lori Ziegelmeier
    Abstract One approach to understanding complex data is to study its shape through the lens of algebraic topology. While the early development of topological data analysis focused primarily on static data, in recent years, theoretical and applied studies have turned to data that varies in time. A time-varying collection of metric spaces as formed, for example, by a moving school of fish or flock of birds, can contain a vast amount of information. There is often a need to simplify or summarize the dynamic behavior. We provide an introduction to topological summaries of time-varying metric spaces including vineyards [17], crocker plots [52], and multiparameter rank functions [34]. We then introduce a new tool to summarize time-varying metric spaces: a crocker stack. Crocker stacks are convenient for visualization, amenable to machine learning, and satisfy a desirable stability property which we prove. We demonstrate the utility of crocker stacks for a parameter identification task involving an influential model of biological aggregations [54]. Altogether, we aim to bring the broader applied mathematics community up-to-date on topological summaries of time-varying metric spaces.
  4. Analyzing Collective Motion With Machine Learning and Topology (2019)

    Dhananjay Bhaskar, Angelika Manhart, Jesse Milzman, John T. Nardini, Kathleen M. Storey, Chad M. Topaz, Lori Ziegelmeier
    Abstract We use topological data analysis and machine learning to study a seminal model of collective motion in biology [M. R. D’Orsogna et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 104302 (2006)]. This model describes agents interacting nonlinearly via attractive-repulsive social forces and gives rise to collective behaviors such as flocking and milling. To classify the emergent collective motion in a large library of numerical simulations and to recover model parameters from the simulation data, we apply machine learning techniques to two different types of input. First, we input time series of order parameters traditionally used in studies of collective motion. Second, we input measures based on topology that summarize the time-varying persistent homology of simulation data over multiple scales. This topological approach does not require prior knowledge of the expected patterns. For both unsupervised and supervised machine learning methods, the topological approach outperforms the one that is based on traditional order parameters.