🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 6 matches in 0.002734s)
  1. Data-Driven and Automatic Surface Texture Analysis Using Persistent Homology (2021)

    Melih C. Yesilli, Firas A. Khasawneh
    Abstract Surface roughness plays an important role in analyzing engineering surfaces. It quantifies the surface topography and can be used to determine whether the resulting surface finish is acceptable or not. Nevertheless, while several existing tools and standards are available for computing surface roughness, these methods rely heavily on user input thus slowing down the analysis and increasing manufacturing costs. Therefore, fast and automatic determination of the roughness level is essential to avoid costs resulting from surfaces with unacceptable finish, and user-intensive analysis. In this study, we propose a Topological Data Analysis (TDA) based approach to classify the roughness level of synthetic surfaces using both their areal images and profiles. We utilize persistent homology from TDA to generate persistence diagrams that encapsulate information on the shape of the surface. We then obtain feature matrices for each surface or profile using Carlsson coordinates, persistence images, and template functions. We compare our results to two widely used methods in the literature: Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Gaussian filtering. The results show that our approach yields mean accuracies as high as 97%. We also show that, in contrast to existing surface analysis tools, our TDA-based approach is fully automatable and provides adaptive feature extraction.
  2. Hypothesis Testing for Shapes Using Vectorized Persistence Diagrams (2020)

    Chul Moon, Nicole A. Lazar
    Abstract Topological data analysis involves the statistical characterization of the shape of data. Persistent homology is a primary tool of topological data analysis, which can be used to analyze those topological features and perform statistical inference. In this paper, we present a two-stage hypothesis test for vectorized persistence diagrams. The first stage filters elements in the vectorized persistence diagrams to reduce false positives. The second stage consists of multiple hypothesis tests, with false positives controlled by false discovery rates. We demonstrate applications of the proposed procedure on simulated point clouds and three-dimensional rock image data. Our results show that the proposed hypothesis tests can provide flexible and informative inferences on the shape of data with lower computational cost compared to the permutation test.
  3. Hepatic Tumor Classification Using Texture and Topology Analysis of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Three-Dimensional T1-Weighted MR Images With a Radiomics Approach (2019)

    Asuka Oyama, Yasuaki Hiraoka, Ippei Obayashi, Yusuke Saikawa, Shigeru Furui, Kenshiro Shiraishi, Shinobu Kumagai, Tatsuya Hayashi, Jun’ichi Kotoku
    Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy for classification of hepatic tumors by characterization of T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images using two radiomics approaches with machine learning models: texture analysis and topological data analysis using persistent homology. This study assessed non-contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted images of 150 hepatic tumors. The lesions included 50 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), 50 metastatic tumors (MTs), and 50 hepatic hemangiomas (HHs) found respectively in 37, 23, and 33 patients. For classification, texture features were calculated, and also persistence images of three types (degree 0, degree 1 and degree 2) were obtained for each lesion from the 3D MR imaging data. We used three classification models. In the classification of HCC and MT (resp. HCC and HH, HH and MT), we obtained accuracy of 92% (resp. 90%, 73%) by texture analysis, and the highest accuracy of 85% (resp. 84%, 74%) when degree 1 (resp. degree 1, degree 2) persistence images were used. Our methods using texture analysis or topological data analysis allow for classification of the three hepatic tumors with considerable accuracy, and thus might be useful when applied for computer-aided diagnosis with MR images.
  4. Phase-Field Investigation of the Coarsening of Porous Structures by Surface Diffusion (2019)

    Pierre-Antoine Geslin, Mickaël Buchet, Takeshi Wada, Hidemi Kato
    Abstract Nano and microporous connected structures have attracted increasing attention in the past decades due to their high surface area, presenting interesting properties for a number of applications. These structures generally coarsen by surface diffusion, leading to an enlargement of the structure characteristic length scale. We propose to study this coarsening behavior using a phase-field model for surface diffusion. In addition to reproducing the expected scaling law, our simulations enable to investigate precisely the evolution of the topological and morphological characteristics along the coarsening process. In particular, we show that after a transient regime, the coarsening is self-similar as exhibited by the evolution of both morphological and topological features. In addition, the influence of surface anisotropy is discussed and comparisons with experimental tomographic observations are presented.
  5. Constructing Shape Spaces From a Topological Perspective (2017)

    Christoph Hofer, Roland Kwitt, Marc Niethammer, Yvonne Höller, Eugen Trinka, Andreas Uhl
    Abstract We consider the task of constructing (metric) shape space(s) from a topological perspective. In particular, we present a generic construction scheme and demonstrate how to apply this scheme when shape is interpreted as the differences that remain after factoring out translation, scaling and rotation. This is achieved by leveraging a recently proposed injective functional transform of 2D/3D (binary) objects, based on persistent homology. The resulting shape space is then equipped with a similarity measure that is (1) by design robust to noise and (2) fulfills all metric axioms. From a practical point of view, analyses of object shape can then be carried out directly on segmented objects obtained from some imaging modality without any preprocessing, such as alignment, smoothing, or landmark selection. We demonstrate the utility of the approach on the problem of distinguishing segmented hippocampi from normal controls vs. patients with Alzheimer’s disease in a challenging setup where volume changes are no longer discriminative.
  6. Morse Theory and Persistent Homology for Topological Analysis of 3D Images of Complex Materials (2014)

    O. Delgado-Friedrichs, V. Robins, A. Sheppard
    Abstract We develop topologically accurate and compatible definitions for the skeleton and watershed segmentation of a 3D digital object that are computed by a single algorithm. These definitions are based on a discrete gradient vector field derived from a signed distance transform. This gradient vector field is amenable to topological analysis and simplification via For-man's discrete Morse theory and provides a filtration that can be used as input to persistent homology algorithms. Efficient implementations allow us to process large-scale x-ray micro-CT data of rock cores and other materials.