🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001214s)
  1. The Persistent Homology Mathematical Framework Provides Enhanced Genotype-to-Phenotype Associations for Plant Morphology (2018)

    Mao Li, Margaret H. Frank, Viktoriya Coneva, Washington Mio, Daniel H. Chitwood, Christopher N. Topp
    Abstract Efforts to understand the genetic and environmental conditioning of plant morphology are hindered by the lack of flexible and effective tools for quantifying morphology. Here, we demonstrate that persistent-homology-based topological methods can improve measurement of variation in leaf shape, serrations, and root architecture. We apply these methods to 2D images of leaves and root systems in field-grown plants of a domesticated introgression line population of tomato (Solanum pennellii). We find that compared with some commonly used conventional traits, (1) persistent-homology-based methods can more comprehensively capture morphological variation; (2) these techniques discriminate between genotypes with a larger normalized effect size and detect a greater number of unique quantitative trait loci (QTLs); (3) multivariate traits, whether statistically derived from univariate or persistent-homology-based traits, improve our ability to understand the genetic basis of phenotype; and (4) persistent-homology-based techniques detect unique QTLs compared to conventional traits or their multivariate derivatives, indicating that previously unmeasured aspects of morphology are now detectable. The QTL results further imply that genetic contributions to morphology can affect both the shoot and root, revealing a pleiotropic basis to natural variation in tomato. Persistent homology is a versatile framework to quantify plant morphology and developmental processes that complements and extends existing methods.
  2. A Morphometric Analysis of Vegetation Patterns in Dryland Ecosystems (2017)

    Luke Mander, Stefan C. Dekker, Mao Li, Washington Mio, Surangi W. Punyasena, Timothy M. Lenton
    Abstract Vegetation in dryland ecosystems often forms remarkable spatial patterns. These range from regular bands of vegetation alternating with bare ground, to vegetated spots and labyrinths, to regular gaps of bare ground within an otherwise continuous expanse of vegetation. It has been suggested that spotted vegetation patterns could indicate that collapse into a bare ground state is imminent, and the morphology of spatial vegetation patterns, therefore, represents a potentially valuable source of information on the proximity of regime shifts in dryland ecosystems. In this paper, we have developed quantitative methods to characterize the morphology of spatial patterns in dryland vegetation. Our approach is based on algorithmic techniques that have been used to classify pollen grains on the basis of textural patterning, and involves constructing feature vectors to quantify the shapes formed by vegetation patterns. We have analysed images of patterned vegetation produced by a computational model and a small set of satellite images from South Kordofan (South Sudan), which illustrates that our methods are applicable to both simulated and real-world data. Our approach provides a means of quantifying patterns that are frequently described using qualitative terminology, and could be used to classify vegetation patterns in large-scale satellite surveys of dryland ecosystems.