🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001209s)
  1. Uncovering Precision Phenotype-Biomarker Associations in Traumatic Brain Injury Using Topological Data Analysis (2017)

    Jessica L. Nielson, Shelly R. Cooper, John K. Yue, Marco D. Sorani, Tomoo Inoue, Esther L. Yuh, Pratik Mukherjee, Tanya C. Petrossian, Jesse Paquette, Pek Y. Lum, Gunnar E. Carlsson, Mary J. Vassar, Hester F. Lingsma, Wayne A. Gordon, Alex B. Valadka, David O. Okonkwo, Geoffrey T. Manley, Adam R. Ferguson, Track-Tbi Investigators
    Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex disorder that is traditionally stratified based on clinical signs and symptoms. Recent imaging and molecular biomarker innovations provide unprecedented opportunities for improved TBI precision medicine, incorporating patho-anatomical and molecular mechanisms. Complete integration of these diverse data for TBI diagnosis and patient stratification remains an unmet challenge. Methods and findings The Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Pilot multicenter study enrolled 586 acute TBI patients and collected diverse common data elements (TBI-CDEs) across the study population, including imaging, genetics, and clinical outcomes. We then applied topology-based data-driven discovery to identify natural subgroups of patients, based on the TBI-CDEs collected. Our hypothesis was two-fold: 1) A machine learning tool known as topological data analysis (TDA) would reveal data-driven patterns in patient outcomes to identify candidate biomarkers of recovery, and 2) TDA-identified biomarkers would significantly predict patient outcome recovery after TBI using more traditional methods of univariate statistical tests. TDA algorithms organized and mapped the data of TBI patients in multidimensional space, identifying a subset of mild TBI patients with a specific multivariate phenotype associated with unfavorable outcome at 3 and 6 months after injury. Further analyses revealed that this patient subset had high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and enrichment in several distinct genetic polymorphisms associated with cellular responses to stress and DNA damage (PARP1), and in striatal dopamine processing (ANKK1, COMT, DRD2). Conclusions TDA identified a unique diagnostic subgroup of patients with unfavorable outcome after mild TBI that were significantly predicted by the presence of specific genetic polymorphisms. Machine learning methods such as TDA may provide a robust method for patient stratification and treatment planning targeting identified biomarkers in future clinical trials in TBI patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01565551
  2. Topological Data Analysis for Discovery in Preclinical Spinal Cord Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury (2015)

    Jessica L. Nielson, Jesse Paquette, Aiwen W. Liu, Cristian F. Guandique, C. Amy Tovar, Tomoo Inoue, Karen-Amanda Irvine, John C. Gensel, Jennifer Kloke, Tanya C. Petrossian, Pek Y. Lum, Gunnar E. Carlsson, Geoffrey T. Manley, Wise Young, Michael S. Beattie, Jacqueline C. Bresnahan, Adam R. Ferguson
    Abstract Data-driven discovery in complex neurological disorders has potential to extract meaningful knowledge from large, heterogeneous datasets. Here the authors apply topological data analysis to assess therapeutic effects in preclinical traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury research studies.
  3. Topological Data Analysis of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Non-O157 Survival in Soils (2014)

    Abasiofiok M. Ibekwe, Jincai Ma, David E. Crowley, Ching-Hong Yang, Alexis M. Johnson, Tanya C. Petrossian, Pek Y. Lum
    Abstract Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 have been implicated in many foodborne illnesses caused by the consumption of contaminated fresh produce. However, data on their persistence in soils are limited due to the complexity in datasets generated from different environmental variables and bacterial taxa. There is a continuing need to distinguish the various environmental variables and different bacterial groups to understand the relationships among these factors and the pathogen survival. Using an approach called Topological Data Analysis (TDA); we reconstructed the relationship structure of E. coli O157 and non-O157 survival in 32 soils (16 organic and 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) with a multi-resolution output. In our study, we took a community approach based on total soil microbiome to study community level survival and examining the network of the community as a whole and the relationship between its topology and biological processes. TDA produces a geometric representation of complex data sets. Network analysis showed that Shiga toxin negative strain E. coli O157:H7 4554 survived significantly longer in comparison to E. coli O157:H7 EDL933, while the survival time of E. coli O157:NM was comparable to that of E. coli O157:H7 strain 933 in all of the tested soils. Two non-O157 strains, E. coli O26:H11 and E. coli O103:H2 survived much longer than E. coli O91:H21 and the three strains of E. coli O157. We show that there are complex interactions between E. coli strain survival, microbial community structures, and soil parameters.