🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001367s)
  1. Gene Expression Data Classification Using Topology and Machine Learning Models (2022)

    Tamal K. Dey, Sayan Mandal, Soham Mukherjee
    Abstract Interpretation of high-throughput gene expression data continues to require mathematical tools in data analysis that recognizes the shape of the data in high dimensions. Topological data analysis (TDA) has recently been successful in extracting robust features in several applications dealing with high dimensional constructs. In this work, we utilize some recent developments in TDA to curate gene expression data. Our work differs from the predecessors in two aspects: (1) Traditional TDA pipelines use topological signatures called barcodes to enhance feature vectors which are used for classification. In contrast, this work involves curating relevant features to obtain somewhat better representatives with the help of TDA. This representatives of the entire data facilitates better comprehension of the phenotype labels. (2) Most of the earlier works employ barcodes obtained using topological summaries as fingerprints for the data. Even though they are stable signatures, there exists no direct mapping between the data and said barcodes.
  2. Determining Clinically Relevant Features in Cytometry Data Using Persistent Homology (2022)

    Soham Mukherjee, Darren Wethington, Tamal K. Dey, Jayajit Das
    Abstract Cytometry experiments yield high-dimensional point cloud data that is difficult to interpret manually. Boolean gating techniques coupled with comparisons of relative abundances of cellular subsets is the current standard for cytometry data analysis. However, this approach is unable to capture more subtle topological features hidden in data, especially if those features are further masked by data transforms or significant batch effects or donor-to-donor variations in clinical data. We present that persistent homology, a mathematical structure that summarizes the topological features, can distinguish different sources of data, such as from groups of healthy donors or patients, effectively. Analysis of publicly available cytometry data describing non-naïve CD8+ T cells in COVID-19 patients and healthy controls shows that systematic structural differences exist between single cell protein expressions in COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. We identify proteins of interest by a decision-tree based classifier, sample points randomly and compute persistence diagrams from these sampled points. The resulting persistence diagrams identify regions in cytometry datasets of varying density and identify protruded structures such as ‘elbows’. We compute Wasserstein distances between these persistence diagrams for random pairs of healthy controls and COVID-19 patients and find that systematic structural differences exist between COVID-19 patients and healthy controls in the expression data for T-bet, Eomes, and Ki-67. Further analysis shows that expression of T-bet and Eomes are significantly downregulated in COVID-19 patient non-naïve CD8+ T cells compared to healthy controls. This counter-intuitive finding may indicate that canonical effector CD8+ T cells are less prevalent in COVID-19 patients than healthy controls. This method is applicable to any cytometry dataset for discovering novel insights through topological data analysis which may be difficult to ascertain otherwise with a standard gating strategy or existing bioinformatic tools.

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