🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001236s)
  1. Path Homologies of Motifs and Temporal Network Representations (2022)

    Samir Chowdhury, Steve Huntsman, Matvey Yutin
    Abstract Path homology is a powerful method for attaching algebraic invariants to digraphs. While there have been growing theoretical developments on the algebro-topological framework surrounding path homology, bona fide applications to the study of complex networks have remained stagnant. We address this gap by presenting an algorithm for path homology that combines efficient pruning and indexing techniques and using it to topologically analyze a variety of real-world complex temporal networks. A crucial step in our analysis is the complete characterization of path homologies of certain families of small digraphs that appear as subgraphs in these complex networks. These families include all digraphs, directed acyclic graphs, and undirected graphs up to certain numbers of vertices, as well as some specially constructed cases. Using information from this analysis, we identify small digraphs contributing to path homology in dimension two for three temporal networks in an aggregated representation and relate these digraphs to network behavior. We then investigate alternative temporal network representations and identify complementary subgraphs as well as behavior that is preserved across representations. We conclude that path homology provides insight into temporal network structure, and in turn, emergent structures in temporal networks provide us with new subgraphs having interesting path homology.
  2. The Importance of Forgetting: Limiting Memory Improves Recovery of Topological Characteristics From Neural Data (2018)

    Samir Chowdhury, Bowen Dai, Facundo Mémoli
    Abstract We develop of a line of work initiated by Curto and Itskov towards understanding the amount of information contained in the spike trains of hippocampal place cells via topology considerations. Previously, it was established that simply knowing which groups of place cells fire together in an animal’s hippocampus is sufficient to extract the global topology of the animal’s physical environment. We model a system where collections of place cells group and ungroup according to short-term plasticity rules. In particular, we obtain the surprising result that in experiments with spurious firing, the accuracy of the extracted topological information decreases with the persistence (beyond a certain regime) of the cell groups. This suggests that synaptic transience, or forgetting, is a mechanism by which the brain counteracts the effects of spurious place cell activity.