🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001114s)
  1. Topological Data Analysis of C. Elegans Locomotion and Behavior (2021)

    Ashleigh Thomas, Kathleen Bates, Alex Elchesen, Iryna Hartsock, Hang Lu, Peter Bubenik
    Abstract Video of nematodes/roundworms was analyzed using persistent homology to study locomotion and behavior. In each frame, an organism's body posture was represented by a high-dimensional vector. By concatenating points in fixed-duration segments of this time series, we created a sliding window embedding (sometimes called a time delay embedding) where each point corresponds to a sequence of postures of an organism. Persistent homology on the points in this time series detected behaviors and comparisons of these persistent homology computations detected variation in their corresponding behaviors. We used average persistence landscapes and machine learning techniques to study changes in locomotion and behavior in varying environments.
  2. TDAExplore: Quantitative Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images Through Topology-Based Machine Learning (2021)

    Parker Edwards, Kristen Skruber, Nikola Milićević, James B. Heidings, Tracy-Ann Read, Peter Bubenik, Eric A. Vitriol
    Abstract Recent advances in machine learning have greatly enhanced automatic methods to extract information from fluorescence microscopy data. However, current machine-learning-based models can require hundreds to thousands of images to train, and the most readily accessible models classify images without describing which parts of an image contributed to classification. Here, we introduce TDAExplore, a machine learning image analysis pipeline based on topological data analysis. It can classify different types of cellular perturbations after training with only 20–30 high-resolution images and performs robustly on images from multiple subjects and microscopy modes. Using only images and whole-image labels for training, TDAExplore provides quantitative, spatial information, characterizing which image regions contribute to classification. Computational requirements to train TDAExplore models are modest and a standard PC can perform training with minimal user input. TDAExplore is therefore an accessible, powerful option for obtaining quantitative information about imaging data in a wide variety of applications.
  3. Using Persistent Homology and Dynamical Distances to Analyze Protein Binding (2016)

    Violeta Kovacev-Nikolic, Peter Bubenik, Dragan Nikolić, Giseon Heo
    Abstract Persistent homology captures the evolution of topological features of a model as a parameter changes. The most commonly used summary statistics of persistent homology are the barcode and the persistence diagram. Another summary statistic, the persistence landscape, was recently introduced by Bubenik. It is a functional summary, so it is easy to calculate sample means and variances, and it is straightforward to construct various test statistics. Implementing a permutation test we detect conformational changes between closed and open forms of the maltose-binding protein, a large biomolecule consisting of 370 amino acid residues. Furthermore, persistence landscapes can be applied to machine learning methods. A hyperplane from a support vector machine shows the clear separation between the closed and open proteins conformations. Moreover, because our approach captures dynamical properties of the protein our results may help in identifying residues susceptible to ligand binding; we show that the majority of active site residues and allosteric pathway residues are located in the vicinity of the most persistent loop in the corresponding filtered Vietoris-Rips complex. This finding was not observed in the classical anisotropic network model.