🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 4 matches in 0.001166s)
  1. Topology in Cyber Research (2022)

    Steve Huntsman, Jimmy Palladino, Michael Robinson
    Abstract We give an idiosyncratic overview of applications of topology to cyber research, spanning the analysis of variables/assignments and control flow in computer programs, a brief sketch of topological data analysis in one dimension, and the use of sheaves to analyze wireless networks. The text is from a chapter in the forthcoming book Mathematics in Cyber Research, to be published by Taylor and Francis.
  2. Topological Differential Testing (2020)

    Kristopher Ambrose, Steve Huntsman, Michael Robinson, Matvey Yutin
    Abstract We introduce topological differential testing (TDT), an approach to extracting the consensus behavior of a set of programs on a corpus of inputs. TDT uses the topological notion of a simplicial complex (and implicitly draws on richer topological notions such as sheaves and persistence) to determine inputs that cause inconsistent behavior and in turn reveal \emph\de facto\ input specifications. We gently introduce TDT with a toy example before detailing its application to understanding the PDF file format from the behavior of various parsers. Finally, we discuss theoretical details and other possible applications.
  3. Geometry and Topology of the Space of Sonar Target Echos (2018)

    Michael Robinson, Sean Fennell, Brian DiZio, Jennifer Dumiak
    Abstract Successful synthetic aperture sonar target classification depends on the “shape” of the scatterers within a target signature. This article presents a workflow that computes a target-to-target distance from persistence diagrams, since the “shape” of a signature informs its persistence diagram in a structure-preserving way. The target-to-target distances derived from persistence diagrams compare favorably against those derived from spectral features and have the advantage of being substantially more compact. While spectral features produce clusters associated to each target type that are reasonably dense and well formed, the clusters are not well-separated from one another. In rather dramatic contrast, a distance derived from persistence diagrams results in highly separated clusters at the expense of some misclassification of outliers.
  4. Sheaves Are the Canonical Data Structure for Sensor Integration (2017)

    Michael Robinson
    Abstract A sensor integration framework should be sufficiently general to accurately represent many sensor modalities, and also be able to summarize information in a faithful way that emphasizes important, actionable information. Few approaches adequately address these two discordant requirements. The purpose of this expository paper is to explain why sheaves are the canonical data structure for sensor integration and how the mathematics of sheaves satisfies our two requirements. We outline some of the powerful inferential tools that are not available to other representational frameworks.