🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001924s)
  1. Path Homologies of Motifs and Temporal Network Representations (2022)

    Samir Chowdhury, Steve Huntsman, Matvey Yutin
    Abstract Path homology is a powerful method for attaching algebraic invariants to digraphs. While there have been growing theoretical developments on the algebro-topological framework surrounding path homology, bona fide applications to the study of complex networks have remained stagnant. We address this gap by presenting an algorithm for path homology that combines efficient pruning and indexing techniques and using it to topologically analyze a variety of real-world complex temporal networks. A crucial step in our analysis is the complete characterization of path homologies of certain families of small digraphs that appear as subgraphs in these complex networks. These families include all digraphs, directed acyclic graphs, and undirected graphs up to certain numbers of vertices, as well as some specially constructed cases. Using information from this analysis, we identify small digraphs contributing to path homology in dimension two for three temporal networks in an aggregated representation and relate these digraphs to network behavior. We then investigate alternative temporal network representations and identify complementary subgraphs as well as behavior that is preserved across representations. We conclude that path homology provides insight into temporal network structure, and in turn, emergent structures in temporal networks provide us with new subgraphs having interesting path homology.
  2. Topological Differential Testing (2020)

    Kristopher Ambrose, Steve Huntsman, Michael Robinson, Matvey Yutin
    Abstract We introduce topological differential testing (TDT), an approach to extracting the consensus behavior of a set of programs on a corpus of inputs. TDT uses the topological notion of a simplicial complex (and implicitly draws on richer topological notions such as sheaves and persistence) to determine inputs that cause inconsistent behavior and in turn reveal \emph\de facto\ input specifications. We gently introduce TDT with a toy example before detailing its application to understanding the PDF file format from the behavior of various parsers. Finally, we discuss theoretical details and other possible applications.