🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 8 matches in 0.001827s)
  1. Specimen-Based Analysis of Morphology and the Environment in Ecologically Dominant Grasses: The Power of the Herbarium (2019)

    Christine A. McAllister, Michael R. McKain, Mao Li, Bess Bookout, Elizabeth A. Kellogg
    Abstract Herbaria contain a cumulative sample of the world's flora, assembled by thousands of people over centuries. To capitalize on this resource, we conducted a specimen-based analysis of a major clade in the grass tribe Andropogoneae, including the dominant species of the world's grasslands in the genera Andropogon, Schizachyrium, Hyparrhenia and several others. We imaged 186 of the 250 named species of the clade, georeferenced the specimens and extracted climatic variables for each. Using semi- and fully automated image analysis techniques, we extracted spikelet morphological characters and correlated these with environmental variables. We generated chloroplast genome sequences to correct for phylogenetic covariance and here present a new phylogeny for 81 of the species. We confirm and extend earlier studies to show that Andropogon and Schizachyrium are not monophyletic. In addition, we find all morphological and ecological characters are homoplasious but variable among clades. For example, sessile spikelet length is positively correlated with awn length when all accessions are considered, but when separated by clade, the relationship is positive for three sub-clades and negative for three others. Climate variables showed no correlation with morphological variation in the spikelet pair; only very weak effects of temperature and precipitation were detected on macrohair density. This article is part of the theme issue ‘Biological collections for understanding biodiversity in the Anthropocene'.
  2. Rootstock Effects on Scion Phenotypes in a ‘Chambourcin’ Experimental Vineyard (2019)

    Zoë Migicovsky, Zachary N Harris, Laura L Klein, Mao Li, Adam McDermaid, Daniel H Chitwood, Anne Fennell, Laszlo G Kovacs, Misha Kwasniewski, Jason P Londo, Qin Ma, Allison J Miller
    Abstract Understanding how root systems modulate shoot system phenotypes is a fundamental question in plant biology and will be useful in developing resilient agricultural crops. Grafting is a common horticultural practice that joins the roots (rootstock) of one plant to the shoot (scion) of another, providing an excellent method for investigating how these two organ systems affect each other. In this study, we used the French-American hybrid grapevine ‘Chambourcin’ (Vitis L.) as a model to explore the rootstock–scion relationship. We examined leaf shape, ion concentrations, and gene expression in ‘Chambourcin’ grown ungrafted as well as grafted to three different rootstocks (‘SO4’, ‘1103P’ and ‘3309C’) across 2 years and three different irrigation treatments. We found that a significant amount of the variation in leaf shape could be explained by the interaction between rootstock and irrigation. For ion concentrations, the primary source of variation identified was the position of a leaf in a shoot, although rootstock and rootstock by irrigation interaction also explained a significant amount of variation for most ions. Lastly, we found rootstock-specific patterns of gene expression in grafted plants when compared to ungrafted vines. Thus, our work reveals the subtle and complex effect of grafting on ‘Chambourcin’ leaf morphology, ionomics, and gene expression.
  3. Morphometrics Reveals Complex and Heritable Apple Leaf Shapes (2018)

    Zoë Migicovsky, Mao Li, Daniel H. Chitwood, Sean Myles
    Abstract Apple (Malus spp.) is a widely grown and valuable fruit crop. Leaf shape is important for flowering in apple and may also be an early indicator for other agriculturally valuable traits. We examined 9,000 leaves from 869 unique apple accessions using linear measurements and comprehensive morphometric techniques. We identified allometric variation as the result of differing length-to-width aspect ratios between accessions and species of apple. The allometric variation was due to variation in the width of the leaf blade, not the length. Aspect ratio was highly correlated with the first principal component (PC1) of morphometric variation quantified using elliptical Fourier descriptors (EFDs) and persistent homology (PH). While the primary source of variation was aspect ratio, subsequent PCs corresponded to complex shape variation not captured by linear measurements. After linking the morphometric information with over 122,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we found high SNP heritability values even at later PCs, indicating that comprehensive morphometrics can capture complex, heritable phenotypes. Thus, techniques such as EFDs and PH are capturing heritable biological variation that would be missed using linear measurements alone.
  4. The Persistent Homology Mathematical Framework Provides Enhanced Genotype-to-Phenotype Associations for Plant Morphology (2018)

    Mao Li, Margaret H. Frank, Viktoriya Coneva, Washington Mio, Daniel H. Chitwood, Christopher N. Topp
    Abstract Efforts to understand the genetic and environmental conditioning of plant morphology are hindered by the lack of flexible and effective tools for quantifying morphology. Here, we demonstrate that persistent-homology-based topological methods can improve measurement of variation in leaf shape, serrations, and root architecture. We apply these methods to 2D images of leaves and root systems in field-grown plants of a domesticated introgression line population of tomato (Solanum pennellii). We find that compared with some commonly used conventional traits, (1) persistent-homology-based methods can more comprehensively capture morphological variation; (2) these techniques discriminate between genotypes with a larger normalized effect size and detect a greater number of unique quantitative trait loci (QTLs); (3) multivariate traits, whether statistically derived from univariate or persistent-homology-based traits, improve our ability to understand the genetic basis of phenotype; and (4) persistent-homology-based techniques detect unique QTLs compared to conventional traits or their multivariate derivatives, indicating that previously unmeasured aspects of morphology are now detectable. The QTL results further imply that genetic contributions to morphology can affect both the shoot and root, revealing a pleiotropic basis to natural variation in tomato. Persistent homology is a versatile framework to quantify plant morphology and developmental processes that complements and extends existing methods.
  5. Topological Data Analysis as a Morphometric Method: Using Persistent Homology to Demarcate a Leaf Morphospace (2018)

    Mao Li, Hong An, Ruthie Angelovici, Clement Bagaza, Albert Batushansky, Lynn Clark, Viktoriya Coneva, Michael J. Donoghue, Erika Edwards, Diego Fajardo, Hui Fang, Margaret H. Frank, Timothy Gallaher, Sarah Gebken, Theresa Hill, Shelley Jansky, Baljinder Kaur, Phillip C. Klahs, Laura L. Klein, Vasu Kuraparthy, Jason Londo, Zoë Migicovsky, Allison Miller, Rebekah Mohn, Sean Myles, Wagner C. Otoni, J. C. Pires, Edmond Rieffer, Sam Schmerler, Elizabeth Spriggs, Christopher N. Topp, Allen Van Deynze, Kuang Zhang, Linglong Zhu, Braden M. Zink, Daniel H. Chitwood
    Abstract Current morphometric methods that comprehensively measure shape cannot compare the disparate leaf shapes found in seed plants and are sensitive to processing artifacts. We explore the use of persistent homology, a topological method applied as a filtration across simplicial complexes (or more simply, a method to measure topological features of spaces across different spatial resolutions), to overcome these limitations. The described method isolates subsets of shape features and measures the spatial relationship of neighboring pixel densities in a shape. We apply the method to the analysis of 182,707 leaves, both published and unpublished, representing 141 plant families collected from 75 sites throughout the world. By measuring leaves from throughout the seed plants using persistent homology, a defined morphospace comparing all leaves is demarcated. Clear differences in shape between major phylogenetic groups are detected and estimates of leaf shape diversity within plant families are made. The approach predicts plant family above chance. The application of a persistent homology method, using topological features, to measure leaf shape allows for a unified morphometric framework to measure plant form, including shapes, textures, patterns, and branching architectures.
  6. A Morphometric Analysis of Vegetation Patterns in Dryland Ecosystems (2017)

    Luke Mander, Stefan C. Dekker, Mao Li, Washington Mio, Surangi W. Punyasena, Timothy M. Lenton
    Abstract Vegetation in dryland ecosystems often forms remarkable spatial patterns. These range from regular bands of vegetation alternating with bare ground, to vegetated spots and labyrinths, to regular gaps of bare ground within an otherwise continuous expanse of vegetation. It has been suggested that spotted vegetation patterns could indicate that collapse into a bare ground state is imminent, and the morphology of spatial vegetation patterns, therefore, represents a potentially valuable source of information on the proximity of regime shifts in dryland ecosystems. In this paper, we have developed quantitative methods to characterize the morphology of spatial patterns in dryland vegetation. Our approach is based on algorithmic techniques that have been used to classify pollen grains on the basis of textural patterning, and involves constructing feature vectors to quantify the shapes formed by vegetation patterns. We have analysed images of patterned vegetation produced by a computational model and a small set of satellite images from South Kordofan (South Sudan), which illustrates that our methods are applicable to both simulated and real-world data. Our approach provides a means of quantifying patterns that are frequently described using qualitative terminology, and could be used to classify vegetation patterns in large-scale satellite surveys of dryland ecosystems.