🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 9 matches in 0.003027s)
  1. HERMES: Persistent Spectral Graph Software (2020)

    Rui Wang, Rundong Zhao, Emily Ribando-Gros, Jiahui Chen, Yiying Tong, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Persistent homology (PH) is one of the most popular tools in topological data analysis (TDA), while graph theory has had a significant impact on data science. Our earlier work introduced the persistent spectral graph (PSG) theory as a unified multiscale paradigm to encompass TDA and geometric analysis. In PSG theory, families of persistent Laplacians (PLs) corresponding to various topological dimensions are constructed via a filtration to sample a given dataset at multiple scales. The harmonic spectra from the null spaces of PLs offer the same topological invariants, namely persistent Betti numbers, at various dimensions as those provided by PH, while the non-harmonic spectra of PLs give rise to additional geometric analysis of the shape of the data. In this work, we develop an open-source software package, called highly efficient robust multidimensional evolutionary spectra (HERMES), to enable broad applications of PSGs in science, engineering, and technology. To ensure the reliability and robustness of HERMES, we have validated the software with simple geometric shapes and complex datasets from three-dimensional (3D) protein structures. We found that the smallest non-zero eigenvalues are very sensitive to data abnormality.
  2. Atom-Specific Persistent Homology and Its Application to Protein Flexibility Analysis (2020)

    David Bramer, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Recently, persistent homology has had tremendous success in biomolecular data analysis. It works by examining the topological relationship or connectivity of a group of atoms in a molecule at a variety of scales, then rendering a family of topological representations of the molecule. However, persistent homology is rarely employed for the analysis of atomic properties, such as biomolecular flexibility analysis or B-factor prediction. This work introduces atom-specific persistent homology to provide a local atomic level representation of a molecule via a global topological tool. This is achieved through the construction of a pair of conjugated sets of atoms and corresponding conjugated simplicial complexes, as well as conjugated topological spaces. The difference between the topological invariants of the pair of conjugated sets is measured by Bottleneck and Wasserstein metrics and leads to an atom-specific topological representation of individual atomic properties in a molecule. Atom-specific topological features are integrated with various machine learning algorithms, including gradient boosting trees and convolutional neural network for protein thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. Extensive numerical results indicate the proposed method provides a powerful topological tool for analyzing and predicting localized information in complex macromolecules.
  3. Evolutionary Homology on Coupled Dynamical Systems With Applications to Protein Flexibility Analysis (2020)

    Zixuan Cang, Elizabeth Munch, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract While the spatial topological persistence is naturally constructed from a radius-based filtration, it has hardly been derived from a temporal filtration. Most topological models are designed for the global topology of a given object as a whole. There is no method reported in the literature for the topology of an individual component in an object to the best of our knowledge. For many problems in science and engineering, the topology of an individual component is important for describing its properties. We propose evolutionary homology (EH) constructed via a time evolution-based filtration and topological persistence. Our approach couples a set of dynamical systems or chaotic oscillators by the interactions of a physical system, such as a macromolecule. The interactions are approximated by weighted graph Laplacians. Simplices, simplicial complexes, algebraic groups and topological persistence are defined on the coupled trajectories of the chaotic oscillators. The resulting EH gives rise to time-dependent topological invariants or evolutionary barcodes for an individual component of the physical system, revealing its topology-function relationship. In conjunction with Wasserstein metrics, the proposed EH is applied to protein flexibility analysis, an important problem in computational biophysics. Numerical results for the B-factor prediction of a benchmark set of 364 proteins indicate that the proposed EH outperforms all the other state-of-the-art methods in the field.
  4. Representability of Algebraic Topology for Biomolecules in Machine Learning Based Scoring and Virtual Screening (2018)

    Zixuan Cang, Lin Mu, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract This work introduces a number of algebraic topology approaches, including multi-component persistent homology, multi-level persistent homology, and electrostatic persistence for the representation, characterization, and description of small molecules and biomolecular complexes. In contrast to the conventional persistent homology, multi-component persistent homology retains critical chemical and biological information during the topological simplification of biomolecular geometric complexity. Multi-level persistent homology enables a tailored topological description of inter- and/or intra-molecular interactions of interest. Electrostatic persistence incorporates partial charge information into topological invariants. These topological methods are paired with Wasserstein distance to characterize similarities between molecules and are further integrated with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, ensemble of trees, and deep convolutional neural networks, to manifest their descriptive and predictive powers for protein-ligand binding analysis and virtual screening of small molecules. Extensive numerical experiments involving 4,414 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database and 128,374 ligand-target and decoy-target pairs in the DUD database are performed to test respectively the scoring power and the discriminatory power of the proposed topological learning strategies. It is demonstrated that the present topological learning outperforms other existing methods in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and ligand-decoy discrimination.
  5. Object-Oriented Persistent Homology (2016)

    Bao Wang, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a quantitative model which correlates the topological persistence of fullerene central cavity with the total curvature energy of the fullerene structure, the proposed method is used for the prediction of fullerene isomer stability. The efficiency and robustness of the present method are verified by more than 500 fullerene molecules. It is shown that the proposed persistent homology based quantitative model offers good predictions of total curvature energies for ten types of fullerene isomers. The present work offers the first example to design object-oriented persistent homology to enhance or preserve desirable features in the original data during the filtration process and then automatically detect or extract the corresponding topological traits from the data.
  6. Multidimensional Persistence in Biomolecular Data (2015)

    Kelin Xia, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants.
  7. Multiresolution Persistent Homology for Excessively Large Biomolecular Datasets (2015)

    Kelin Xia, Zhixiong Zhao, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.
  8. Persistent Topology for Cryo-Em Data Analysis (2015)

    Kelin Xia, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract SummaryIn this work, we introduce persistent homology for the analysis of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) density maps. We identify the topological fingerprint or topological signature of noise, which is widespread in cryo-EM data. For low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) volumetric data, intrinsic topological features of biomolecular structures are indistinguishable from noise. To remove noise, we employ geometric flows that are found to preserve the intrinsic topological fingerprints of cryo-EM structures and diminish the topological signature of noise. In particular, persistent homology enables us to visualize the gradual separation of the topological fingerprints of cryo-EM structures from those of noise during the denoising process, which gives rise to a practical procedure for prescribing a noise threshold to extract cryo-EM structure information from noise contaminated data after certain iterations of the geometric flow equation. To further demonstrate the utility of persistent homology for cryo-EM data analysis, we consider a microtubule intermediate structure Electron Microscopy Data (EMD 1129). Three helix models, an alpha-tubulin monomer model, an alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin model, and an alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin dimer model, are constructed to fit the cryo-EM data. The least square fitting leads to similarly high correlation coefficients, which indicates that structure determination via optimization is an ill-posed inverse problem. However, these models have dramatically different topological fingerprints. Especially, linkages or connectivities that discriminate one model from another, play little role in the traditional density fitting or optimization but are very sensitive and crucial to topological fingerprints. The intrinsic topological features of the microtubule data are identified after topological denoising. By a comparison of the topological fingerprints of the original data and those of three models, we found that the third model is topologically favored. The present work offers persistent homology based new strategies for topological denoising and for resolving ill-posed inverse problems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  9. Persistent Homology Analysis of Protein Structure, Flexibility, and Folding (2014)

    Kelin Xia, Guo-Wei Wei
    Abstract SUMMARYProteins are the most important biomolecules for living organisms. The understanding of protein structure, function, dynamics, and transport is one of the most challenging tasks in biological science. In the present work, persistent homology is, for the first time, introduced for extracting molecular topological fingerprints (MTFs) based on the persistence of molecular topological invariants. MTFs are utilized for protein characterization, identification, and classification. The method of slicing is proposed to track the geometric origin of protein topological invariants. Both all-atom and coarse-grained representations of MTFs are constructed. A new cutoff-like filtration is proposed to shed light on the optimal cutoff distance in elastic network models. On the basis of the correlation between protein compactness, rigidity, and connectivity, we propose an accumulated bar length generated from persistent topological invariants for the quantitative modeling of protein flexibility. To this end, a correlation matrix-based filtration is developed. This approach gives rise to an accurate prediction of the optimal characteristic distance used in protein B-factor analysis. Finally, MTFs are employed to characterize protein topological evolution during protein folding and quantitatively predict the protein folding stability. An excellent consistence between our persistent homology prediction and molecular dynamics simulation is found. This work reveals the topology–function relationship of proteins. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.