🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

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  1. The Architecture of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Is Regulated by the Reversible Lipid Modification of the Shaping Protein CLIMP-63 (2018)

    Patrick A. Sandoz, Robin A. Denhardt-Eriksson, Laurence Abrami, Luciano Abriata, Gard Spreemann, Catherine Maclachlan, Sylvia Ho, BĂ©atrice Kunz, Kathryn Hess, Graham Knott, Vassily Hatzimanikatis, F. Gisou van der Goot
    Abstract \textlessh3\textgreaterAbstract\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterThe endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has a complex morphology generated and maintained by membrane-shaping proteins and membrane energy minimization, though not much is known about how it is regulated. The architecture of this intracellular organelle is balanced between large, thin sheets that are densely packed in the perinuclear region and a connected network of branched, elongated tubules that extend throughout the cytoplasm. Sheet formation is known to involve the cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein 63 (CLIMP-63), though its regulation and the depth of its involvement remain unknown. Here we show that the post-translational modification of CLIMP-63 by the palmitoyltransferase ZDHHC6 controls the relative distribution of CLIMP-63 between the ER and the plasma membrane. By combining data-driven mathematical modeling, predictions, and experimental validation, we found that the attachment of a medium chain fatty acid, so-called S-palmitoylation, to the unique CLIMP-63 cytoplasmic cysteine residue drastically reduces its turnover rate, and thereby controls its abundance. Light microscopy and focused ion beam electron microcopy further revealed that enhanced CLIMP-63 palmitoylation leads to strong ER-sheet proliferation. Altogether, we show that ZDHHC6-mediated S-palmitoylation regulates the cellular localization of CLIMP-63, the morphology of the ER, and the interconversion of ER structural elements in mammalian cells through its action on the CLIMP-63 protein.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterSignificance Statement\textless/h3\textgreater \textlessp\textgreaterEukaryotic cells subcompartmentalize their various functions into organelles, the shape of each being specific and necessary for its proper role. However, how these shapes are generated and controlled is poorly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum is the largest membrane-bound intracellular compartment, accounting for more than 50% of all cellular membranes. We found that the shape and quantity of its sheet-like structures are controlled by a specific protein, cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein 63, through the acquisition of a lipid chain attached by an enzyme called ZDHHC6. Thus, by modifying the ZDHHC6 amounts, a cell can control the shape of its ER. The modeling and prediction technique used herein also provides a method for studying the interconnected function of other post-translational modifications in organelles.\textless/p\textgreater