🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.002117s)
  1. Topological Data Analysis of Spatial Patterning in Heterogeneous Cell Populations: Clustering and Sorting With Varying Cell-Cell Adhesion (2023)

    Dhananjay Bhaskar, William Y. Zhang, Alexandria Volkening, Björn Sandstede, Ian Y. Wong
    Abstract Different cell types aggregate and sort into hierarchical architectures during the formation of animal tissues. The resulting spatial organization depends (in part) on the strength of adhesion of one cell type to itself relative to other cell types. However, automated and unsupervised classification of these multicellular spatial patterns remains challenging, particularly given their structural diversity and biological variability. Recent developments based on topological data analysis are intriguing to reveal similarities in tissue architecture, but these methods remain computationally expensive. In this article, we show that multicellular patterns organized from two interacting cell types can be efficiently represented through persistence images. Our optimized combination of dimensionality reduction via autoencoders, combined with hierarchical clustering, achieved high classification accuracy for simulations with constant cell numbers. We further demonstrate that persistence images can be normalized to improve classification for simulations with varying cell numbers due to proliferation. Finally, we systematically consider the importance of incorporating different topological features as well as information about each cell type to improve classification accuracy. We envision that topological machine learning based on persistence images will enable versatile and robust classification of complex tissue architectures that occur in development and disease.
  2. Topological Data Analysis of Collective and Individual Epithelial Cells Using Persistent Homology of Loops (2021)

    Dhananjay Bhaskar, William Y. Zhang, Ian Y. Wong
    Abstract Interacting, self-propelled particles such as epithelial cells can dynamically self-organize into complex multicellular patterns, which are challenging to classify without a priori information. Classically, different phases and phase transitions have been described based on local ordering, which may not capture structural features at larger length scales. Instead, topological data analysis (TDA) determines the stability of spatial connectivity at varying length scales (i.e. persistent homology), and can compare different particle configurations based on the “cost” of reorganizing one configuration into another. Here, we demonstrate a topology-based machine learning approach for unsupervised profiling of individual and collective phases based on large-scale loops. We show that these topological loops (i.e. dimension 1 homology) are robust to variations in particle number and density, particularly in comparison to connected components (i.e. dimension 0 homology). We use TDA to map out phase diagrams for simulated particles with varying adhesion and propulsion, at constant population size as well as when proliferation is permitted. Next, we use this approach to profile our recent experiments on the clustering of epithelial cells in varying growth factor conditions, which are compared to our simulations. Finally, we characterize the robustness of this approach at varying length scales, with sparse sampling, and over time. Overall, we envision TDA will be broadly applicable as a model-agnostic approach to analyze active systems with varying population size, from cytoskeletal motors to motile cells to flocking or swarming animals.
  3. Analyzing Collective Motion With Machine Learning and Topology (2019)

    Dhananjay Bhaskar, Angelika Manhart, Jesse Milzman, John T. Nardini, Kathleen M. Storey, Chad M. Topaz, Lori Ziegelmeier
    Abstract We use topological data analysis and machine learning to study a seminal model of collective motion in biology [M. R. D’Orsogna et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 104302 (2006)]. This model describes agents interacting nonlinearly via attractive-repulsive social forces and gives rise to collective behaviors such as flocking and milling. To classify the emergent collective motion in a large library of numerical simulations and to recover model parameters from the simulation data, we apply machine learning techniques to two different types of input. First, we input time series of order parameters traditionally used in studies of collective motion. Second, we input measures based on topology that summarize the time-varying persistent homology of simulation data over multiple scales. This topological approach does not require prior knowledge of the expected patterns. For both unsupervised and supervised machine learning methods, the topological approach outperforms the one that is based on traditional order parameters.