🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 3 matches in 0.001159s)
  1. Cooperative Grasping Through Topological Object Representation (2014)

    A. Marzinotto, J. A. Stork, D. V. Dimarogonas, D. Kragic
    Abstract We present a cooperative grasping approach based on a topological representation of objects. Using point cloud data we extract loops on objects suitable for generating entanglement. We use the Gauss Linking Integral to derive controllers for multi-agent systems that generate hooking grasps on such loops while minimizing the entanglement between robots. The approach copes well with noisy point cloud data, it is computationally simple and robust. We demonstrate the method for performing object grasping and transportation, through a hooking maneuver, with two coordinated NAO robots.
  2. Grasping Objects With Holes: A Topological Approach (2013)

    F. T. Pokorny, J. A. Stork, D. Kragic
    Abstract This work proposes a topologically inspired approach for generating robot grasps on objects with `holes'. Starting from a noisy point-cloud, we generate a simplicial representation of an object of interest and use a recently developed method for approximating shortest homology generators to identify graspable loops. To control the movement of the robot hand, a topologically motivated coordinate system is used in order to wrap the hand around such loops. Finally, another concept from topology - namely the Gauss linking integral - is adapted to serve as evidence for secure caging grasps after a grasp has been executed. We evaluate our approach in simulation on a Barrett hand using several target objects of different sizes and shapes and present an initial experiment with real sensor data.
  3. A Topology-Based Object Representation for Clasping, Latching and Hooking (2013)

    J. A. Stork, F. T. Pokorny, D. Kragic
    Abstract We present a loop-based topological object representation for objects with holes. The representation is used to model object parts suitable for grasping, e.g. handles, and it incorporates local volume information about these. Furthermore, we present a grasp synthesis framework that utilizes this representation for synthesizing caging grasps that are robust under measurement noise. The approach is complementary to a local contact-based force-closure analysis as it depends on global topological features of the object. We perform an extensive evaluation with four robotic hands on synthetic data. Additionally, we provide real world experiments using a Kinect sensor on two robotic platforms: a Schunk dexterous hand attached to a Kuka robot arm as well as a Nao humanoid robot. In the case of the Nao platform, we provide initial experiments showing that our approach can be used to plan whole arm hooking as well as caging grasps involving only one hand.