🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 2 matches in 0.001023s)
  1. WDR76 Co-Localizes With Heterochromatin Related Proteins and Rapidly Responds to DNA Damage (2016)

    Joshua M. Gilmore, Mihaela E. Sardiu, Brad D. Groppe, Janet L. Thornton, Xingyu Liu, Gerald Dayebgadoh, Charles A. Banks, Brian D. Slaughter, Jay R. Unruh, Jerry L. Workman, Laurence Florens, Michael P. Washburn
    Abstract Proteins that respond to DNA damage play critical roles in normal and diseased states in human biology. Studies have suggested that the S. cerevisiae protein CMR1/YDL156w is associated with histones and is possibly associated with DNA repair and replication processes. Through a quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity purifications here we show that the human homologue of this protein, WDR76, shares multiple protein associations with the histones H2A, H2B, and H4. Furthermore, our quantitative proteomic analysis of WDR76 associated proteins demonstrated links to proteins in the DNA damage response like PARP1 and XRCC5 and heterochromatin related proteins like CBX1, CBX3, and CBX5. Co-immunoprecipitation studies validated these interactions. Next, quantitative imaging studies demonstrated that WDR76 was recruited to laser induced DNA damage immediately after induction, and we compared the recruitment of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage to known DNA damage proteins like PARP1, XRCC5, and RPA1. In addition, WDR76 co-localizes to puncta with the heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX5, which are also recruited to DNA damage but much less intensely than WDR76. This work demonstrates the chromatin and DNA damage protein associations of WDR76 and demonstrates the rapid response of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage.
  2. Conserved Abundance and Topological Features in Chromatin-Remodeling Protein Interaction Networks (2015)

    Mihaela E Sardiu, Joshua M Gilmore, Brad D Groppe, Damir Herman, Sreenivasa R Ramisetty, Yong Cai, Jingji Jin, Ronald C Conaway, Joan W Conaway, Laurence Florens, Michael P Washburn
    Abstract Abstract The study of conserved protein interaction networks seeks to better understand the evolution and regulation of protein interactions. Here, we present a quantitative proteomic analysis of 18 orthologous baits from three distinct chromatin-remodeling complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens. We demonstrate that abundance levels of orthologous proteins correlate strongly between the two organisms and both networks have highly similar topologies. We therefore used the protein abundances in one species to cross-predict missing protein abundance levels in the other species. Lastly, we identified a novel conserved low-abundance subnetwork further demonstrating the value of quantitative analysis of networks.