🍩 Database of Original & Non-Theoretical Uses of Topology

(found 4 matches in 0.001493s)
  1. Using Multidimensional Topological Data Analysis to Identify Traits of Hip Osteoarthritis (2018)

    Jasmine Rossi‐deVries, Valentina Pedoia, Michael A. Samaan, Adam R. Ferguson, Richard B. Souza, Sharmila Majumdar
    Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifaceted disease with many variables affecting diagnosis and progression. Topological data analysis (TDA) is a state-of-the-art big data analytics tool that can combine all variables into multidimensional space. TDA is used to simultaneously analyze imaging and gait analysis techniques. Purpose To identify biochemical and biomechanical biomarkers able to classify different disease progression phenotypes in subjects with and without radiographic signs of hip OA. Study Type Longitudinal study for comparison of progressive and nonprogressive subjects. Population In all, 102 subjects with and without radiographic signs of hip osteoarthritis. Field Strength/Sequence 3T, SPGR 3D MAPSS T1ρ/T2, intermediate-weighted fat-suppressed fast spin-echo (FSE). Assessment Multidimensional data analysis including cartilage composition, bone shape, Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) classification of osteoarthritis, scoring hip osteoarthritis with MRI (SHOMRI), hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS). Statistical Tests Analysis done using TDA, Kolmogorov–Smirnov (KS) testing, and Benjamini-Hochberg to rank P-value results to correct for multiple comparisons. Results Subjects in the later stages of the disease had an increased SHOMRI score (P \textless 0.0001), increased KL (P = 0.0012), and older age (P \textless 0.0001). Subjects in the healthier group showed intact cartilage and less pain. Subjects found between these two groups had a range of symptoms. Analysis of this subgroup identified knee biomechanics (P \textless 0.0001) as an initial marker of the disease that is noticeable before the morphological progression and degeneration. Further analysis of an OA subgroup with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) showed anterior labral tears to be the most significant marker (P = 0.0017) between those FAI subjects with and without OA symptoms. Data Conclusion The data-driven analysis obtained with TDA proposes new phenotypes of these subjects that partially overlap with the radiographic-based classical disease status classification and also shows the potential for further examination of an early onset biomechanical intervention. Level of Evidence: 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;48:1046–1058.
  2. Uncovering Precision Phenotype-Biomarker Associations in Traumatic Brain Injury Using Topological Data Analysis (2017)

    Jessica L. Nielson, Shelly R. Cooper, John K. Yue, Marco D. Sorani, Tomoo Inoue, Esther L. Yuh, Pratik Mukherjee, Tanya C. Petrossian, Jesse Paquette, Pek Y. Lum, Gunnar E. Carlsson, Mary J. Vassar, Hester F. Lingsma, Wayne A. Gordon, Alex B. Valadka, David O. Okonkwo, Geoffrey T. Manley, Adam R. Ferguson, Track-Tbi Investigators
    Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex disorder that is traditionally stratified based on clinical signs and symptoms. Recent imaging and molecular biomarker innovations provide unprecedented opportunities for improved TBI precision medicine, incorporating patho-anatomical and molecular mechanisms. Complete integration of these diverse data for TBI diagnosis and patient stratification remains an unmet challenge. Methods and findings The Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Pilot multicenter study enrolled 586 acute TBI patients and collected diverse common data elements (TBI-CDEs) across the study population, including imaging, genetics, and clinical outcomes. We then applied topology-based data-driven discovery to identify natural subgroups of patients, based on the TBI-CDEs collected. Our hypothesis was two-fold: 1) A machine learning tool known as topological data analysis (TDA) would reveal data-driven patterns in patient outcomes to identify candidate biomarkers of recovery, and 2) TDA-identified biomarkers would significantly predict patient outcome recovery after TBI using more traditional methods of univariate statistical tests. TDA algorithms organized and mapped the data of TBI patients in multidimensional space, identifying a subset of mild TBI patients with a specific multivariate phenotype associated with unfavorable outcome at 3 and 6 months after injury. Further analyses revealed that this patient subset had high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and enrichment in several distinct genetic polymorphisms associated with cellular responses to stress and DNA damage (PARP1), and in striatal dopamine processing (ANKK1, COMT, DRD2). Conclusions TDA identified a unique diagnostic subgroup of patients with unfavorable outcome after mild TBI that were significantly predicted by the presence of specific genetic polymorphisms. Machine learning methods such as TDA may provide a robust method for patient stratification and treatment planning targeting identified biomarkers in future clinical trials in TBI patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01565551
  3. MRI and Biomechanics Multidimensional Data Analysis Reveals R2 -R1ρ as an Early Predictor of Cartilage Lesion Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis (2017)

    Valentina Pedoia, Jenny Haefeli, Kazuhito Morioka, Hsiang-Ling Teng, Lorenzo Nardo, Richard B. Souza, Adam R. Ferguson, Sharmila Majumdar
    Abstract PURPOSE: To couple quantitative compositional MRI, gait analysis, and machine learning multidimensional data analysis to study osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a multifactorial disorder accompanied by biochemical and morphological changes in the articular cartilage, modulated by skeletal biomechanics and gait. While we can now acquire detailed information about the knee joint structure and function, we are not yet able to leverage the multifactorial factors for diagnosis and disease management of knee OA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We mapped 178 subjects in a multidimensional space integrating: demographic, clinical information, gait kinematics and kinetics, cartilage compositional T1ρ and T2 and R2 -R1ρ (1/T2 -1/T1ρ ) acquired at 3T and whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score morphological grading. Topological data analysis (TDA) and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test were adopted for data integration, analysis, and hypothesis generation. Regression models were used for hypothesis testing. RESULTS: The results of the TDA showed a network composed of three main patient subpopulations, thus potentially identifying new phenotypes. T2 and T1ρ values (T2 lateral femur P = 1.45*10-8 , T1ρ medial tibia P = 1.05*10-5 ), the presence of femoral cartilage defects (P = 0.0013), lesions in the meniscus body (P = 0.0035), and race (P = 2.44*10-4 ) were key markers in the subpopulation classification. Within one of the subpopulations we observed an association between the composite metric R2 -R1ρ and the longitudinal progression of cartilage lesions. CONCLUSION: The analysis presented demonstrates some of the complex multitissue biochemical and biomechanical interactions that define joint degeneration and OA using a multidimensional approach, and potentially indicates that R2 -R1ρ may be an imaging biomarker for early OA. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:78-90.
  4. Topological Data Analysis for Discovery in Preclinical Spinal Cord Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury (2015)

    Jessica L. Nielson, Jesse Paquette, Aiwen W. Liu, Cristian F. Guandique, C. Amy Tovar, Tomoo Inoue, Karen-Amanda Irvine, John C. Gensel, Jennifer Kloke, Tanya C. Petrossian, Pek Y. Lum, Gunnar E. Carlsson, Geoffrey T. Manley, Wise Young, Michael S. Beattie, Jacqueline C. Bresnahan, Adam R. Ferguson
    Abstract Data-driven discovery in complex neurological disorders has potential to extract meaningful knowledge from large, heterogeneous datasets. Here the authors apply topological data analysis to assess therapeutic effects in preclinical traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury research studies.